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    The New YorkerJill Lepore2/5/1823 min
    5 reads5 comments
    10
    The New Yorker
    5 reads
    10
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    • thorgalle2 weeks ago

      Interesting! This paints the context of Frankenstein specifically, but also shows how a book can have several political “readings” in different times and geographies. Adding Frankenstein somewhere on top of my reading list :)

    • Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      I remember reading a children's version of Frankenstein to my kids. And what I can distinctly recall most is the gentle gathering of tears that spilled down my cheeks. This background story really heightens my desire to reread this incredible masterwork. I can’t say this with more enthusiasm - a 10! A must read!

      1. Update (5/30/2021):

        Loved reading your story too!

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
        3 weeks ago

        Loving these origin backstories! 👍

        • Pegeen
          ScoutScribe
          2 weeks ago

          Thanks Dellwood, me too! Backstories add SO much more to any story. Even something like the Olympics and American Ninja Warrior! I love people’s stories, always fascinating. And a lot of times inspirational.

    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Great Read! I Really Need to add this book to my ever-long read list. Interesting dive into the connection and symbolic thread with slavery in the finale of the article.

      He asked, “Can he who the day before was a trampled slave suddenly become liberal-minded, forbearing, and independent?”

      Will never forget the first time I finally viewed James Whales’ 1931 Frankenstein and how in awe I was of the emotion and power in the aftermath of viewing:

      I was living in an Amazing large building/home complex in Koreatown (a Huge Blessing after scary Homelessness). I learned that screenwriter Alexander Payne has lived in the building and written some of his early scripts there like Election. The neighbors were an eccentric couple; one worked at Walt Disney and I forget what his husband did. They would invite neighbors over every summer for backyard film projection viewings (something I aspire for creating in future) and project films up on a screen sized portion of their home. What a magical experience!

      I remember going over early and meeting a couple of attractive men who were dating and having great conversations with civil discourse over liking/disliking Stranger Things (I Loooove).

      The film selection that night was Whales’ Frankenstein and the whole experience was completely magical. I will never forget the film. The empathy the film creates and the jaw-dropping controversial drowning of the little girl. Intermission saw many of us chattering away. I recall getting an incredible tour of their house that night as well.

      A Night To Remember. The only downside being that my lover who I was seeing and who had become a huge moral support through the lowest before the Blessing was unable to attend.