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    The Hollywood ReporterSteve Chagollan12/1/2111 min
    2 reads2 comments
    9.0
    The Hollywood Reporter
    2 reads
    9.0
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    • Florian5 months ago

      I actually saw Encanto just today. I don’t thunk it really compares with Moana and Raya which both had much bigger and deeper story lines but I appreciated reading that they selected the voice artists to really match the origins of the characters

    • DellwoodBarker5 months ago

      Absolutely wonderful!

      A percussionist at heart and in practice (she composes on piano), Franco’s unorthodox approach to her craft involves laying down rhythms first, then employing an orchestra to play on top of those tracks. For Encanto‘s score, she took pains to use instruments indigenous to Colombia, which, to the untrained ear, might sound similar to those associated with Mexico.

      “Because of the colonizers and the instruments they brought, there are very similar instruments, but the rhythms are different,” explains Franco. “So a Colombian accordion player would play it completely different than a Norteño [regional Mexican] player. And then the harp, they call it the arpa llanera, which sounds similar to the Veracruzana harp, but it’s different.”

      When Mirabel visits the hidden lair of her Tío Bruno, the black sheep of the family, Franco says the filmmakers wanted a distinct sound, so she employed a flute specific to Colombia called the gaita, which “is meant to sound like a bird.”

      And re-posting this again here:

      Go. See. This. Film. 5 stars.

      Might be my favorite Disney (Pixar-no-longer-Pixar film) to date. Truly vibrant wonder, hypnotically captivating, pulsating flow, deeply touching/healing, and genuinely funny. You will likely cry, maybe even sob and walk out feeling cleansed/alive/full of joy and appreciation. A bit like Beauty and the Beast and 1000 Years of Solitude having a niña/ niño with an Almondovar piñata.

      1. Update (12/4/2021):

        Correction: 100 Years of Solitude