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    • Pegeen
      Reading streakScoutScribe
      1 year ago

      This had me laugh out loud, as they both seem worthy opponents. I’m certainly rooting for NYC to come back. And I believe it will.

      • Karenz
        Scribe
        1 year ago

        As soon as I heard the writer invoke bandwidth as a reason for the demise of NYC, I heard on the news that Zoom had a huge collapse because of all the use of it! I have no doubt however that bandwidth will continue to expand and zoom-like opportunities proliferate. This argument made the most sense to me for the demise of cities like NY with their high rent office towers. I’m from NJ originally and NOT a NYC fan but I tend to agree with Seinfeld that it’ll re-emerge and reinvent itself.

    • Plum1 year ago

      Jerry is right. It will be back, different and the same, there has to be a nyc.

      • TerriShirley1 year ago

        People are always leaving the city. And as someone who grew up in Florida, I saw first hand they would move to Florida and then complain that it wasn't like NYC. Maybe I have become cynical, but I think Altucher wrote it in linkedin to do what linkedin does best...promote yourself and your business. Stir it up and get some publicity. What I really want to know is why did he go all the way to Florida? New Jersey is the best place to live.

    • SEnkey1 year ago

      Jerry is probably right, but he's triggering a tribal response instead of addressing the argument that the article made. You can sum up his argument as "Hey New Yorkers this guy says our city sucks. Get him!" Which is really funny, and the guy does set himself up for some punches as we all "feel" for the chess playing comedy club owner who writes for a living in the greatest city in the world, but it isn't an argument.

      I'd be really interesting in seeing a robust response. I think NYC has enough cultural attractions and legacy to see itself through most challenges. But how to address that deficit? And the less and less reliable revenue streams?

    • bartadamley
      Scout
      1 year ago

      He went on to decry remote working. “There’s some other stupid thing in the article about ‘bandwidth’ and how New York is over because everybody will ‘remote everything’. Guess what: everyone hates to do this. Everyone. Hates. You know why? There’s no energy.

      I'm on Seinfeld's side, and yet I totally get the other side to this argument. If the present situation enables the astronomical price for rent to shoot down in NYC, perhaps for those who are deeming NYC as 'dying' end up leaving... initiating a whole new wave of entrepreneurship, opportunities into the city, as the NYC doomers leave in an uproar, creating opportunities for those currently who can't afford to live in NYC.

      I totally understand the argument for as to how remote work is truly wonderful and how there is no need to go into the office everyday. However, it can be isolating, and I think in an increasingly remote work world, bigger cities will strangely enough become more preferable... as more and more offices will transform into living/coworking spaces.

      There is that something special about the energy in NYC which has always made the city so appealing, and it is my belief that in a post-COVID world this will still be the case.

    • jackdille1 year ago

      Lil internet spat here between Altucher & Seinfeld. Reading this in NYC, I'm inclined to agree with Seinfeld although I actually do like Altucher's writing and agree with his points on a lot of people leaving NYC for good.

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScout
        1 year ago

        Yep. I've been kinda-sorta following this. I think they're both right. Here's the essay that started it all.

        • Pegeen
          Reading streakScoutScribe
          1 year ago

          Thanks for the link Bill, a more detailed account.