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    The CutLisa Miller12/21/1840 min
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    The Cut
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    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      🦋💕❤️‍🩹 The final paragraph IS EVERYTHING ❤️‍🩹💕🦋

      WE NEED TO RE-VISIT ANCIENT TRIBAL MYSTICS/SHAMAN CHANNELS FOR UNDERSTANDING HOW TO HELP BROTHERS/SISTERS/MOTHERS/FATHERS NAVIGATE THE EXPERIENCES OF THE UNKNOWN/UNEXPLAINABLE ESOTERIC NATURE OF SPIRIT & THE MULTI~SIDE(S) OF 3-D.

      Also, this section really jumped out with Intensity:

      At the large midwestern university where she is a professor, Talia had been studying the Nazi program Aktion T4, the wholesale rounding up and extermination of people who were disabled, elderly, or mentally ill, and now she began to fear that she was a Nazi target. It was the worst kind of paranoia, she says, because it was based in her own extensive research. She knew everything about Aktion T4. “I knew how the paperwork was done for Aktion T4. I knew how the bus system worked,” she tells me as we sit one afternoon at her dining-room table. Pale and wide-eyed, she comes across as delicate, like a person who has survived a wreck or a trauma, which she has. “I fell off a cliff,” is how she puts it. The election of Trump amplified her fears. Her rational mind clearly saw the historical analogies between the nationalistic right of 2016 and the Nazi Party. Her irrational mind turned an academic observation into a full-blown reality. To stop Nazi doctors from spying on her, Talia covered the windows in her front hall with white computer paper and kept the blinds in the living room permanently closed. One afternoon when she was home alone, there was a knock at the door and Talia hid in the closet, so sure was she that the Nazis had come to take her away.

      It was around this time that Talia started pacing the kitchen ceaselessly, unable to speak. She plastered every inch of the dining table — the same one where we sit with our coffee mugs — with Post-it reminders of things to do. She couldn’t shop or cook or drive or read. “I remember trying to read the directions on a muffin box and it was bewildering to me,” she says. She was able to communicate with her husband, Ted, only by scribbling notes, and Ted, a professor at the same university, was forced to tell Talia’s department chair that she was unwell; he then took a leave from his job to care for her and their daughter. Ted remembers wondering throughout that awful time whether this was the new normal, with his wife mute and the shades always drawn. “In my mind, I’m running a thousand miles a minute,” he says. “So now we’re just going to be writing everything to each other? It’s ridiculous, but I start thinking, If I can accept this, then we’re good.”

    • Pegeen
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Wow, this is important information about a subject I know very little about - schizophrenia. But the thread is a common one - we can’t continue to do scientific studies using male subjects and then apply the results to women.

      • SEnkey1 week ago

        Amen. I love the ending - we all need community. Community isn't a cure; community lets us know we aren't alone.

        • Pegeen
          Top reader this weekScoutScribe
          1 week ago

          I 100% agree!