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    The Economist | 10/24/20 | 5 min
    29 reads15 comments
    9.2
    The Economist
    29 reads
    9.2
    You must read the article before you can post or reply.
    • marius3 days ago

      It’s probably an interesting factor but is this the cause of what we see? I really don’t think so. Fooled by randomness.

      • SEnkey
        Top reader this weekScoutScribe
        1 day ago

        Good point. Correlation is not causation.

    • bartadamley
      Scout
      2 days ago

      Really useful article to grasp where we are in this current political moment. This is a read I typically wouldn’t pick up & read, but come onto the horizon thanks to @Billsfriendjake! Thanks for the find!

    • Billsfriendjake
      Scout
      1 week ago

      100% what we’re seeing in America right now. 50 years of policy pushing more secondary school students towards four year college, without a growing need for folks with these degrees, coupled with stagnating living standards, ballooning debt, and social upheaval... more than 30% of recent college graduates are underemployed or unemployed. reestablishes a need to push towards better vocational training and more efficient means for educating and re-education the labor force.

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        1 week ago

        Excellent. I haven't read anything from The Economist in a while and I forgot what I was missing. Very strong, clear argument. Short, smart and sharp.

        I met with some folks at the Economist a few years ago and was extremely impressed. Their editorial team proudly "takes a stance" (and not just on an article by article basis, but as an entire organization) and none of the articles ever have bylines.

        My only gripe: The headline should say "over-educated" instead of “brainy." The implication is that auto mechanics, electricians, machine workers, etc, aren't brainy, which is very very wrong.

        • OMS1 week ago

          I totally agree !

          • Peachy2 days ago

            I concur. Intelligence is not just an academic number.

          • Raven1 week ago

            Classism is here to stay until a new economic paradigm is imagined. The working class has always kept the human Ark afloat.

            • SEnkey
              Top reader this weekScoutScribe
              6 days ago

              I hope for less classism, but classism exist in any economic paradigm. Capitalism, communism, socialism, feudalism, substance farming/hunter gatherer societies, etc. "The poor will always be with you" is another way of saying there will always be classes.

              • Raven6 days ago

                I think if someone is “poor” it is because of many factors that they experience some things they can control and some they cannot. What others can do is help elevate their fellow human being to a healthy level of success and prosperity thus moving forward in their own evolution. “Poor people” need not be “poor” for long especially not for their entire lives. This breaks classism because with empathy we can hold ourselves to a higher standard and stand higher without standing upon others.

    • SEnkey
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      6 days ago

      I'm less concerned with 'classism' or 'elites' than I am with opportunity and societal goals. "Expectation is the root of all heartache" as the Bard said. I won't ever be the one percent, but if I can live well I'll be fine and happy. I've been happy not living well lol.

      I do agree that we should examine what our goals are and what our end-in-mind is. Not every student entering kindergarten needs/wants/should go to college. So we shouldn't push that as the only option, as if people who don't go are failures or are locked out of a good life. We should open more venues like vocation training, and get rid of barriers of entry like requiring college degrees. We use degree requirements as really expensive IQ tests. If a person can do the job, let them, and pay them accordingly.

    • Florian
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago

      Highly recommend. I had multiple penny drop moments while reading this

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        1 week ago

        Agreed. I can't stop thinking about the surplus of lawyers. That's why privacy policies are so bloated. To protect their jobs, these surplus lawyers promote unnecessary fear. "You're liable for x." "You're not protected from y." "Make sure you z, or you could be in big trouble."

        • Florian
          Top reader this weekReading streakScout
          6 days ago

          Yes, I totally agree. A broken system that feeds itself. It’s a dream for the 1% in the industry who take home 99% of the profits.

    • Raven1 week ago

      Bravo for keeping the light shining through. Cyclical patterns are the only way for us understand the broader issues that any generation faces.