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    SonimaAnne Koller6/11/1511 min
    17 reads10 comments
    9.6
    Sonima
    17 reads
    9.6
    You must read the article before you can post or reply.
    • jamie6 days ago

      I take a daily tub and feel funky if for some reason if I do not have the time. Interesting how some people resist a tub. My whole family are tub people. I do meditate in my tub. It is my special time. I just cannot understand a home or an apartment without one. Very reaffirming article, We are not nuts.

      • Pegeen
        Reading streakScoutScribe
        6 days ago

        Your comment made me laugh out loud. I grew up the youngest of 5 girls. My dad was a police officer and my mom a stay at home until I was in school. We didn’t have a lot of money, so there were no designer clothes, fancy cars or even whole milk. I hated Carnation Instant Milk that my mom would make - it was lumpy and had a light blue tinge. Anyway, my dad would fill the tub up with water and all of us girls took turns bathing. Dear God, by the time I got in there, it was freezing and scum was floating on the top! Needless to say, I never acquired a desire for a soak!

    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
      1 week ago

      This begs the question: What if we can utilize our thoughts and words for positive change while we are in water? Could we rewire our body and mind to default to the balance and peace it feels when in water?

      In my experience being in water can serve as a reminder of our natural human state: flowing, changing, self-aware, and resilient. It is all-pervading and in constant flux.

      Every word of this is believed as True~True Here. Water therapy is consistently proving all of the above in my own life. Deeply missing hot tub and swimming pool therapy-need to change this. Baths and cold showers are undeniably key factors in maintaining sanity recently.

      Currently on S3 of Avatar: The Last Airbender. Powerful alignment~Ing.

      • Karenz1 week ago

        I have loved living by water, across from the Delaware River growing up as a kid and ice skating on a frozen pond. My happiest times on water have been in a kayak but the last time I tried to get into and out of one was similar to my experience in a bathtub! Nothing could ever persuade me to take a cold shower!! I think it’s incredibly mysterious that so much of our bodies are water.

    • Pegeen
      Reading streakScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Love every word in this article. I read Masaru Emoto’s remarkable books The Hidden Messages in Water and The Healing Power of Water. Both are compelling and surely prove how essential water is to our wellbeing. Current theories in the medical world feel that dehydration is one of the root causes of all diseases. By the time you actually feel thirst, you are dehydrated so it’s important to drink pure water throughout your day.

      • Jessica
        ScoutScribe
        1 week ago

        Thanks for sharing this, Pegeen! This article really made me want to read Emoto's books. Really glad to see that his books have your recommendation!

        • Pegeen
          Reading streakScoutScribe
          1 week ago

          Thanks Jessica. If I would recommend Hidden Messages in Water first because it’s mind blowing, as are the pictures. Bonnie Tsui’s book Why We Swim sounds equally interesting. And I agree with your comment about floating and looking at the sky - beautiful!

    • Jessica
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      This article reminds me of Bonnie Tsui's Why We Swim. Tsui explores the human relationship with water from anthropological, scientific, and community-based points of view which certainly bring to light many themes in this article!

      In this study, Emoto played music, displayed words, and prayed to water while it was freezing, and when the water was frozen it created crystal shapes distinct to each stimuli. When the words and music were positive and loving, intricate crystal shapes appeared, and on the contrary, when sounds and words were negative and harsh, chaotic, incoherent shapes formed.

      Wow, I have to look into this study more. This is so fascinating. I have Emoto's The Hidden Messages in Water on my list of books to mull over.

      Research shows that floating helps lower cortisol levels, which relaxes the nervous system, alleviates pain, and reduces negative effects of stress in the body.

      I haven't swam much since I was a teenager, mostly due to lack of pool access. But I distinctly remember that my favorite moments in the pool were when I was floating. There's something about the weightlessness that just quieted down all the noise around me, and I loved how floating allowed me to only look in one direction: up, and often at the sky.

      Aquacycling is a relatively new type of group cycling done in a pool with bikes that uses water as resistance.

      Aquacycling sounds like a great challenge for me to ease back into the water again. I've heard that water aerobics in general are enjoyable and challenging. I'm curious to see if aquacycling classes are near me!

    • TripleG
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago

      Amazing aqua.

    • Florian1 week ago

      Whatever water hears, sees, and feels becomes a catalyst for its change as it copies, memorizes, and transports information. Japanese researcher Masaru Emoto demonstrated this with his water crystal project. In this study, Emoto played music, displayed words, and prayed to water while it was freezing, and when the water was frozen it created crystal shapes distinct to each stimuli. When the words and music were positive and loving, intricate crystal shapes appeared, and on the contrary, when sounds and words were negative and harsh, chaotic, incoherent shapes formed.

      Now remember our body is 70% water 🤯