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    • EZ19691 year ago

      Hacks are fun and entertaining. Some of them actually work. And they can provide encouragement. I have a friend who sits on a ball at work. That probably came to him as a hack. Lots of folks get up and move during the work day. A great idea that was no doubt marketed as a “hack”. Which is, I guess, a marketing hack. Hack is the new “curated.” Maybe this writer should curate his hacks.

      • Vanette1 year ago

        For me, the word "hack" conjures up the image of a furball barfed up by a cat, or someone clearing his throat and getting ready to spit, or what someone does when they want to break into your computer. Isn't there a better word?

        • bill
          Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
          1 year ago

          Ha! So true. In this context, "hack" is being used to mean "shortcut." And I think that the point that the author is trying to make is that shortcuts are often ill-conceived, lazy, and counterproductive.

          Work that's worth doing is worth doing right - slowly, carefully, with intention. An obsession with cutting corners is probably a good reason to zoom out and reconsidered why you're doing what you're doing in the first place.

    • Vanette1 year ago

      Thank you. Would love to have this message go around the world and inspire people to "unplug" from the "garbage-in-garbage-out" culture the internet has fostered.

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        1 year ago

        Yep. "Chop wood, carry water" is truly sage.