1. Join Readup to read with jbuchana.

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    • washingtonpost | Andrew Van Dam | 5/27/20 | 7 min
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      20 hours ago

      My kids are all zoomers and millennials, and they just don't have the opportunities I did when I was their age.

    • The Next Web | Tristan Greene | 5/28/20 | 9 min
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      21 hours ago

      Here’s hoping our system of checks and balances in the US is prepared for what could be its biggest test in years.

      Since Trump effectively controls all three branches of the government...

    • protocol | David Pierce | 5/27/20 | 14 min
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      1 day ago

      I spend a lot of time on Reddit, I've seen this situation referred to, but it hasn't made any real waves in the subs I hang out in most of the time.

    • that seems important | 5/28/20 | 5 min
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      2 days ago
    • Live Science | Stephanie Pappas | 5/18/20 | 9 min
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      1 week ago

      Meanwhile, as the political debate over the response to the virus heats up, some have argued that death reports are being deliberately skewed.

      I had a customer at work yesterday who told me, "My sister is a nurse at {local hospital}. She told me that the government pays $3500 for every death certificate that says 'COVID-19.' on it. So, unless someone takes a bullet to the head, their death will always be due to the COVID-19." I didn't really have much of a reply to that. He started out by saying that the virus was a fake, that he didn't know anyone who had it, and neither did we. One of my co-workers said that another co-worker's daughter had had it and recovered, and I said that the son-in-law of a friend was the first person in the city to die of it. He said that someone was lying, either us, or the people who told us this. Then he started in on the $3500 rant.

      BTW, if anyone has noticed a lack of posting I'm going through one of the worst weeks of my life, one tragic thing, and a bunch of other overwhelming things all at once. In a week or so I'll probably be reading more at my normal rate.

    • Vox | Sara Morrison | 5/13/20 | 7 min
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      2 weeks ago

      The Patriot Act should indeed be repealed, it should never have been passed in the first place.

    • film.avclub.com | Ignatiy Vishnevetsky | 5/7/20 | 17 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Fantastic writing. I've never been, and surely never will, be in a movie rental place like Odd Obsession. All the video stores I've been too have been slick and commercial. I get the vibe though, I've hung out at two bookstores, a restaurant, and an electronics shop that had a similar feel. They're gone now too, none of them made it as far as Odd Obsession.

    • The Guardian | Rutger Bregman | 5/9/20 | 14 min
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      2 weeks ago

      An uplifting story, this makes me feel good.

    • Quillette | 5/7/20 | 10 min
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      2 weeks ago
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      2 weeks ago

      The relevance to parachute use is that individuals jumping from aircraft without the help of a parachute are likely to have a high prevalence of pre-existing psychiatric morbidity.

      It follows, therefore, that the apparent protective effect of parachutes may be merely an example of the “healthy cohort” effect.

      This is very convincing.

    • commentarymagazine.com | 5/6/20 | 4 min
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      2 weeks ago
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      2 weeks ago

      I hate Chuck E Cheese pizza. I hate the whole Chuck E Cheese experience. I have to go with various grandkids and nieces/nephews several times a year. I call it the Temple of the Devil Mouse.

    • The Atlantic | Andrew Ferguson | 5/9/20 | 5 min
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      2 weeks ago

      I love the term "word lump." If you have enough word lumps, you can make word salad.

    • The Paris Review | Sabrina Orah Mark | 5/7/20 | 9 min
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      2 weeks ago

      I love this.

    • The New York Times Company | NATASHA SINGER | 5/11/20 | 8 min
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      2 weeks ago

      While temperature screening seems pretty benign, some other tacking ideas are perhaps a little more concerning.

    • The New York Times Company | Shira Ovide | 5/11/20 | 3 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Some people I know buy into this sort of misinformation quite easily.

    • connectom.substack.com | Thibaut | 5/3/20 | 4 min
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      2 weeks ago
    • Hackaday | 5/9/20 | 1 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Getting back to (electronics) basics.

    • fs.blog | 4/28/12 | 20 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I love to read DFW. I don’t always agree with him though.

      all that was was a couple Eskimos happened to come wandering by and showed me the way back to camp

      I sure get that though!

      And the truth is that most of these suicides are actually dead long before they pull the trigger.

      In retrospect, very ironic.

      the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about “teaching you how to think.”

      Cliche or not, he goes on to describe just this, for the appropriate definition of “how to think.” In my “Science” as opposed to liberal arts learning, what I think I learned that was more important than the actual knowledge was not “how to think”, but “how to learn.” In the technology fields I usually work in, the technology is always rapidly changing, improving. What I learned decades ago in school is only of value if learning has continued since then. Fossilized technical knowledge has little practical value.

      you can’t take your frustration out on the frantic lady working the register, who is overworked at a job whose daily tedium and meaninglessness surpasses the imagination of any of us here at a prestigious college.

      As someone who has worked jobs from landscaping to apartment maintenance, to electronic engineering, computer programming, Unix Sysadmin, and now works as a cashier, I object to having my work written off as meaningless, as I’m sure the lady at the supermarket checkout would as well.

      I sometimes take classes at a local college (I graduated with my BS in ‘88, but still take classes now and then) A few years ago, I took a literature/writing class. One of the assignments was to write a paper about DFW’s “Consider the Lobster.” I enjoyed the piece, as I do this one, but I felt marginalized then too. He marginalized locals who went to a lobster festival. A lobster festival which seemed almost exactly like our popular Pork Festival. It seemed that he considered those festival attendees, as well as our Pork Festival attendees as somehow less than himself, and other right-minded fortunate people. Cashiers are apparently in the same class of NPCs.

      Except thinking this way tends to be so easy and automatic that it doesn’t have to be a choice

      He may have been aware of this, despite his being steeped in it. That’s sort of what this speech seems to be about.

      The only thing that’s capital-T True is that you get to decide how you’re gonna try to see it.

      Or perhaps he’s just saying that you can control how the situation affects you, not the way you view these other “lesser” people.

      If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough. It’s the truth. Worship your body and beauty and sexual allure and you will always feel ugly. And when time and age start showing, you will die a million deaths before they finally grieve you.

      Here though I couldn’t agree more.

      Worship power, you will end up feeling weak and afraid, and you will need ever more power over others to numb you to your own fear.

      Perhaps is says something about what I've been thinking lately, but I thought “Trump” as soon as I read this. Perhaps, in a way, I should be concerned for Trump, he’s probably suffering every moment he’s awake, and probably as he sleeps as well. He may be horrible for us, but he’s surely just as bad for himself.

      the so-called real world of men and money and power hums merrily along in a pool of fear and anger and frustration and craving and worship of self.

      Yes.

      As expected, I enjoyed reading this transcript, and feel I should probably search for more DFW to read.

    • The Temper | 5/4/20 | 5 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Unbelievable. Shameful. I used to drink a lot, but stopped 19 years ago when my psychiatrist told me that the meds she prescribed would work a lot better without alcohol. My wife stopped years before that, well before I met her, she's been a sober alcoholic for decades. Before the shutdown, we used to go to a local gym for exercise, but have never been really serious about athletics. Still, even though it has no effect on us, marketing alcohol as healthy just seems like a bad thing to me. Somewhat evil actually.

    • The Atlantic | McKay Coppins | 5/8/20 | 4 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Wow. I hate air travel at the best of times. Again, people this concerned just isn't what I'm used to seeing. Now that our state is opening up, today I've gone out a little more and was pleasantly surprised to see the customers at Sam's Club taking things far more seriously than at my tool store. I forgot my mask, and since most customers at my store don't wear masks, and us employees do, I'm used to feeling out of place by wearing one. In fact, I've been told by customers that I shouldn't be wearing a "fear mask." That must be a republican thing, more than one person has used that phrase. At Sam's Club, the opposite happened, and I felt out of place by not having a mask. Other than embarrassment and slight concern for my safety, I was however pleased to see that at least part of our local population is taking the virus seriously.

    • The New Yorker | Jonathan Zeller | 5/8/20 | 3 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Not too impressive an article.

    • The New Yorker | Miranda July | 6/4/07 | 15 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I love this story. likebill, I read it years ago and remembered a lot of it. For some reason, the name, Roy Spivey, resonates more than the rest of the story. I was 45 when it came out.

    • The New Yorker | Andrew Marantz | 4/9/20 | 10 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Can Biden win now? That concerns me. It bothers me that that concerns me, as I really dislike Biden, as a I suspect many do. But he'd be a darn sight better than trump, and i hope many people believe this and vote that way.

    • The Atlantic | Kaitlyn Tiffany | 5/6/20 | 10 min
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      3 weeks ago

      “Karen began as a Black meme used to describe white women who tattle on Black kids’ lemonade stands,” the community organizer Gwen Snyder tweeted last week. “White boys stole it and turned it into code for ‘bitch.’”

      I did not know this origin. I'm familiar with the term from the retail worker's subreddits on Reddit. A Karen there is the woman who insists of you calling the manager because you won't take a coupon from another store, or who claims she's going to call the owner and get you fired for not selling her something for half price because she only wants one iem in a BOGO sale.

      Now the subreddit is focused on a new species of Karen: the type of protester who insists that social distancing should end because she needs a haircut.

      we won’t personally become a vector for disease, even if we’re breaking rules and taking risks for our own comfort.

      On the subject of expecting oneself to be an exception from something bad, there's a subreddit called r/leaopardsatemyface which is about people voting for a political party that doesn't have their best interests at heart and then getting upset when they, do indeed, find that these politicians are working against their interests. "I know I voted for face-eating leopards, but i didn't expect them to eat my face..."

      If so, what is the male equivalent?

      There are two. One is simply a "male Karen", the other is a "Chad." "Chad has two meanings that I know of, a male Karen, and the imaginary alpha male who steals women away from incels. On the 'net, an "incel" is a male who is involuntarily celibate, and doesn't realize that this is the case because they are a horrible example of humanity, not because "Chad" is taking all the women.

    • HuffPost Highline | Caroline Bologna | 5/7/20 | 3 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Some countries go further and have lists of acceptable traditional names that must be adhered to.

    • Lisa Richardson Bylines | 4/21/20 | 5 min
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      3 weeks ago

      “We are all dealing with the collective loss of the world we knew,” said Kessler.

      As an essential worker who never left the house much other than work, restaurants, and occasional shopping, living in a very red virus-denying area, I have trouble understanding how the shutdown has shattered other people's lives.

      I'm trying, but it seems so alien to me. I do miss eating out about 3 times week, but that's just not the same thing as other people are feeling...

    • CNBC | Taylor Locke | 4/15/20 | 2 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I've never seen or thought of a situation where bitcoin solves any problem for me.

    • The New York Times Company | Kate Conger | 5/5/20 | 6 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Uber has also argued that its core business is technology, not rides, and therefore drivers are not a key part of its business.

      The word "disingenuous' was surely invented for this statement. I'd be happy to pay a bit more for a ride if it helped the drivers. How much the rates would have to go up is an interesting question though.

    • Hackaday | 5/7/20 | 4 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Extortion As A Service

      Nice home automation system you’ve got there. Would be a shame if anything happened to it.

      I feel that this situation for other companies is going to be more and more of a problem as time goes on.

    • Seth's Blog | 11/30/16 | 1 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I like to think I've gotten bit "better" slowly over the years...

    • The New York Times Company | Amanda Hess | 5/1/20 | 5 min
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      3 weeks ago

      One gets the sense that for the bookcase-background type, being judged by their home libraries is a secret dream finally realized

      I'm going to avoid bragging about my bookcases here...

      The appearance of the credibility bookcase suggests that the levers of expertise and professionalism are operating normally, even though they are very much not.

      I'd noticed the bookcase background being used, but I never really gave it any thought until this argument. It's amusing to wonder if any of those books have actually been read. I'm sure the Britanica hasn't been used in a while.

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      3 weeks ago

      People pushing to reopen early in rural areas, or even lightly hit cities like mine are engaging in magical thinking. The politicians that are encouraging this are basically evil.

    • Business Insider | Will Martin | 5/3/20 | 3 min
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      3 weeks ago

      It looks like there is a window-falling epidemic there as well...

    • psychologytoday.com | 3 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I can never remember what I get in the Myers-Briggs test. I don't think it matters though.

    • The Verge | Tom Warren | 4/24/20 | 1 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I haven't used two spaces since typing class in the '70s.

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 6/19/19 | 34 min
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      3 weeks ago

      That is a horrifying job to have. I don't see how anyone could view this sort of material all day, day after day, and not be scarred emotionally. I used to work in Unix/Linux Sysadmin at a Fortune 50 company. Sometimes an employee would be accused of having objectionable material on their computer. We had a lot more Windows machines than Unix/Linux, so I presume a Windows admin had to investigate those. When the machine in question was a Unix/Linux machine, I was one of two people who were assigned to investigate. It had to be someone with technical skills, since these people, usually engineers with some knowledge of the systems, tended to try to hide the material. We'd go into a locked server room and sit at a monitor aimed away from the door so that no one could accidentally be exposed to such material at work. Then we'd look for it. Mostly it was fairly ordinary porn, something I don't like, but hardly traumatizing. A few times it was worse, and one time still haunts me nearly 20 years later. These poor people doing facebook moderation look at that sort of thing constantly all day. I'm surprised they do as well as they do. I just could not handle it in that quantity. It seems that they can't either, and that's totally understandable.

    • Andreessen Horowitz | 4/19/20 | 10 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I think SEnkey says it well: "Everything is simple when you don't know anything about it."

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      3 weeks ago

      It's interesting to think that loneliness as an emotion is a relatively new emotion.

    • The Atlantic | Derek Thompson | 4/27/20 | 22 min
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      3 weeks ago

      The virus could reverse gentrification. That's something I hadn't thought about until very recently when i'v read several articles that mentioned this likely trend. The worry the author has about indepedantly owned restaurants concerns me, as we have a few really nice locally owned restaurants here in Kokomo, that are quite good. Hopefully they survive.