1. Join Readup to read with deephdave.

    deephdave
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    58 followers
    • nautil.us | 12/23/20 | 15 min
      1 read1 comment
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      nautil.us
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      deephdave
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      22 hours ago

      Fascinating Read!

      The leap is from using a picture as a picture (a logogram) to using it to portray a sound (or phonogram)—the Rebus Principle. Many children play a game using this principle, when they discover that a bee can be used for the sound “be,” and combined with a drawing of a leaf, these two unrelated objects can suddenly produce a meaning—belief.

      Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

    • The Paris Review | Mairead Small Staid | 2/8/19 | 11 min
      3 reads2 comments
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      The Paris Review
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      deephdave
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      22 hours ago
    • The New York Times Company | MATT RICHTEL | 11/21/10 | 22 min
      3 reads2 comments
      9.3
      The New York Times Company
      3 reads
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 day ago

      “If it weren’t for the Internet, I’d focus more on school and be doing better academically,” he says. But thanks to the Internet, he says, he has discovered and pursued his passion: filmmaking. Without the Internet, “I also wouldn’t know what I want to do with my life.”

    • The Guardian | 1/16/21 | 5 min
      5 reads3 comments
      9.5
      The Guardian
      5 reads
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 day ago
    • The New York Times Company | Kyle Chayka | 1/19/21 | 21 min
      1 read0 comments
      9.0
      The New York Times Company
      1 read
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      deephdave
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      1 day ago
    • The Hindu | Ishan Patra | 1/18/21 | 9 min
      1 read1 comment
      9.0
      The Hindu
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 day ago

      Developers will continue to develop for a very long time because a lot of the problems that no-code tools solve are actually simple, such as building another marketplace, another delivery service, or another website, Nile explains. “I think that code is going to solve harder problems, and then more people are going to solve their problems with no-code tools. I think there is always going to be code.”

      PS: The Rise of "No Code"

    • aaronzlewis.com | Aaron Z. Lewis | 19 min
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      aaronzlewis.com
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      deephdave
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      2 days ago

      The perils of algorithm!

      But nowadays my internal monologue speaks tweet by default. Thoughts bubble up from the depths of my psyche readymade for the timeline, already twisted into the pre-programmed shape of a Post. I wonder if the algorithm is starting to interfere with the way my subconscious works. What if it’s filtering out thoughts that it doesn’t think will perform well online? Every day, thousands of strangers upload little slices of their consciousness directly into my mind. My concern is that I’m prone to mistake their thoughts for my own — that some part of me believes I’m only hearing myself think. Sometimes when I wake up in the morning, I’ll scroll through my old posts just to remind myself of myself. It feels like looking in the mirror. I’m swallowing my (digital) self so that I’m me instead of someone else.

      Old: You are the average of your 5 closest friends. New: You are an average of the 50 people you follow online and whose opinions you have invited into your head. Be careful of who you let in to your head. -- 30 tips by Manas J. Saloi

    • Medium | Aaron Nichols | 12/24/20 | 4 min
      13 reads5 comments
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      Medium
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      2 days ago

      A well-lived life has more to do with perspective than anything else. As long as you can laugh, there is hope.

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 1/18/21 | 7 min
      34 reads19 comments
      9.6
      blog.readup.com
      34 reads
      9.6
      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      2 days ago

      Violence and conspiracy theories don’t spread amongst people who read. On the flip side, they spread like wildfire on platforms that incentivize non-reading, knee-jerk reactions, and attention-grabbing language and visuals. In other words, platforms that thrive on content that is fast, shallow, and fake.

    • inverted passion | 1/18/21 | 3 min
      5 reads2 comments
      9.8
      inverted passion
      5 reads
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      3 days ago

      it’s better to be king of a niche than a nobody in a vast ocean.

    • The New Yorker | Anna Wiener | 8/8/19 | 33 min
      7 reads12 comments
      9.5
      The New Yorker
      7 reads
      9.5
      deephdave
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      3 days ago
    • deephdave
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      3 days ago
    • meltingasphalt.com | 25 min
      5 reads4 comments
      9.5
      meltingasphalt.com
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      deephdave
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      3 days ago

      Obsessions, compulsions, addictions, and other "inner demons" aren't the only agents with real power to control and explain our behavior; our brains are host to 'benevolent' agents as well. Our consciences, for example. These are agents that live inside our brains, who are being trained throughout our lives, but especially in childhood, by our interactions with parents, authority figures, and other moral teachers, and by various rewards and (especially) punishments.

    • nextnature.net | 97 min
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      nextnature.net
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      deephdave
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      4 days ago

      Insightful views of Marshall McLuhan about the proliferation of media, changes in education system, and their impact on society.

      Another basic problem is that in our schools there is simply too much to learn by the traditional analytic methods; this is an age of information overload. The only way to make the schools other than prisons without bars is to start fresh with new techniques and values.

      It's inevitable that the world-pool of electronic information movement will toss us all about like corks on a stormy sea, but if we keep our cool during the descent into the maelstrom, studying the process as it happens to us and what we can do about it, we can come through.

    • Quanta Magazine | 15 min
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      Quanta Magazine
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      deephdave
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      4 days ago
    • Collaborative Fund | Morgan Housel | 1/14/21 | 2 min
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      Collaborative Fund
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      deephdave
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      4 days ago
    • The Guardian | 1/10/21 | 3 min
      7 reads2 comments
      9.6
      The Guardian
      7 reads
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      5 days ago
    • Karthi's Blog | Karthi Subbaraman | 1/16/21 | 3 min
      7 reads3 comments
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      Karthi's Blog
      7 reads
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      5 days ago

      Because it is energy intensive process one or two things happen here. We get tired and we close the tap to cut the feed. On the other end we get picky and get stuck with the never ending loop. Both are detrimental for a creative. This is why we get stuck with a blank canvas (no input) or we get stuck with too many drafts (no publishing).

    • Atlas Obscura | Colin Dickey | 8/13/20 | 11 min
      1 read1 comment
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      Atlas Obscura
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      6 days ago

      Von Däniken’s success came in part from his ability to start with legitimate gaps in our knowledge, ignore evidence that contradicted his own claim, and then magnify the supposed ignorance of science. He argued, for example, that Egyptologists don’t know how or why the pyramids were built. In fact, there are detailed records on this from the Egyptians themselves. But this counterevidence is immaterial as the main hypothesis grows exponentially. Much of this is driven by what’s sometimes called apophenia, the tendency to see shapes and patterns where none exist—the idea that everything is, one way or another, connected.

    • bookbear express | Ava | 1/13/21 | 24 min
      11 reads4 comments
      9.3
      bookbear express
      11 reads
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago
    • wavefunction.fieldofscience.com | 19 min
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      wavefunction.fieldofscience.com
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago

      "I am thinking about something much more important than bombs; I am thinking about computers."

      Von Neumann's big achievement was in being able to move away from vacuum tubes, wires, punch cards and magnetic core memory to a high-level view of computing that also led him to see parallels with the human brain. Basically this view told him that any computational framework - biological or electronic - must have five basic components: an input, an output, an arithmetic unit, a processing unit that manipulates data and a memory that stores data.

    • palladium magazine | Samo Burja | 5/28/20 | 15 min
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      palladium magazine
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago

      Without socialization, most of us wouldn’t know how to use any particular technology, or even what it was made for. Technology only reproduces itself through instruction or imitation—and only when embedded in the larger social organism that puts it to use. Every device not only has a manual but a social context. It is then social rather than material facts that drive or hinder the development and adoption of technology. The technologies we integrate into society become the foundation on which future technologies are built. We accept or reject technology together as a society.

    • qotoqot.com | 17 min
      13 reads7 comments
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      qotoqot.com
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago
    • Vox | Hope Reese | 10/2/19 | 17 min
      16 reads4 comments
      9.2
      Vox
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago
    • jezebel.com | Marie Solis | 12/29/20 | 10 min
      6 reads1 comment
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      jezebel.com
      6 reads
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago
    • The New Yorker | Jill Lepore | 1/11/21 | 23 min
      9 reads5 comments
      9.6
      The New Yorker
      9 reads
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago

      After a while, everyone was supposed to love work. “Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life” popped up all over the place in the nineteen-eighties and nineties, along with the unpaid internship, the busting of unions, and campaigns to cut taxes on capital gains. It soon became, in Silicon Valley and on Wall Street, a catechism. “The only way to do great work is to love what you do,” Steve Jobs told a graduating class at Stanford in 2005. “If you love what you’re doing, it’s not ‘work,’ ” David M. Rubenstein, a C.E.O. of the Carlyle Group, said on CNBC in 2014. “Everywhere you look you hear people talking about meaning,” a disillusioned Google engineer told McCallum. “They aren’t philosophers. They aren’t psychologists. They sell banner ads.” It’s not pointless. But it’s not poetry. Still, does it have to be?

    • harpers.org | 111 min
      7 reads8 comments
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      harpers.org
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago

      Magnificent read!

      There is nothing more interesting than time: the days that are endless, the days that get away. There are days of the distant past that remain so vivid to me that I could walk back into them and pick up the conversation mid-sentence, while there are other days (weeks, months, people, places) I couldn’t recall to save my life. One of the last things I understand when I’m putting a novel together is the structure of time. When does the story start and when does it end? Will time be linear or can it stutter and skip? At what point does our understanding of the action shift?

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 1/11/21 | 3 min
      39 reads3 comments
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      blog.readup.com
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago
    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 10 min
      9 reads5 comments
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      breaking smart
      9 reads
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      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago

      Tinkering is a process of serendipity-seeking that does not just tolerate uncertainty and ambiguity, it requires it. When conditions for it are right, the result is a snowballing effect where pleasant surprises lead to more pleasant surprises.

    • The New York Times Company | Tony Gervino | 7/15/11 | 4 min
      12 reads5 comments
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      The New York Times Company
      12 reads
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago
    • theringer.com | Scott Tobias | 12/29/20 | 11 min
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      theringer.com
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago
    • deephdave
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      1 week ago

      Signal & Telegram, FTW!

    • deephdave
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      1 week ago

      Stop making this a big scary decision and start taking lots of continuous small steps. Take something you love doing - or if you're not sure what that is, something you'd like to try. And move towards it now.

    • The Atlantic | David Brooks | 5/13/20 | 9 min
      3 reads2 comments
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      The Atlantic
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago

      The theory of maximum taste says that each person’s mind is defined by its upper limit—the best that it habitually consumes and is capable of consuming.

    • Raptitude.com | 11/26/19 | 4 min
      32 reads12 comments
      8.7
      Raptitude.com
      32 reads
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago
    • Deep Dish | 10/12/18 | 5 min
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      Deep Dish
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago

      “Somebody wants you to do something, fuck you. Boss pisses you off, fuck you! Own your house. Have a couple bucks in the bank. Don’t drink. That’s all I have to say to anybody on any social level. Did your grandfather take risks? I guarantee he did it from a position of fuck you. A wise man’s life is based around fuck you.” — JOHN GOODMAN, THE GAMBLER

    • The New York Times Company | DANIEL JONES | 1/9/15 | 5 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago
    • The New Yorker | Anna Wiener | 12/28/20 | 27 min
      10 reads3 comments
      9.5
      The New Yorker
      10 reads
      9.5
      deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago
    • Granta Magazine | 1/4/21 | 17 min
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      Granta Magazine
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      deephdave
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      1 week ago

      I Love Running! :)

      The novelist Haruki Murakami might be this type of long-distance runner’s most idealized form – seemingly zen about having completed multiple marathons. ‘You don’t have to go to any particular place to do it,’ he wrote in the New Yorker, in 2008. ‘As long as you have a pair of running shoes and a good road you can run to your heart’s content.’ He’s the kind of runner that runners like me aspire to be, and so chill about it, as though he’s just washed up on the shores of the isle of inner peace.

    • The New Yorker | Cal Newport | 12/14/20 | 6 min
      27 reads11 comments
      9.0
      The New Yorker
      27 reads
      9.0
      deephdave
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      1 week ago