1. Join Readup to read with bill.

    bill
    Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
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    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 days ago
    • Medium | #Unity2020 | 6/29/20 | 11 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Upvote. I always love a good, big idea.

    • The Cut | Madeleine Aggeler | 8/4/20 | 20 min
      12 reads4 comments
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      The Cut
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I did the yoga teacher training at Yoga to the People and taught and assisted on both coasts. I’m extremely sad to see it go. It was a staple for me in NYC and SF/Berkeley.

      This is a loss.

    • The New York Times Company | JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH, Ezra Marcus | 8/4/20 | 10 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      BethAnn is like a digital version of Rachel Dolezal. This story is nuts.

      To be honest, I couldn’t stop LOLing every time someone was like “I remember thinking, ‘Is this BethAnn?’” Lolol. It’s BethAnn!

      “I was pretty shocked,” said Erica Smith, a postdoctoral researcher at Indiana University. “I had never had particularly great experiences with @Sciencing_Bi, but I thought that she was a whole real human who had just died. I was surprised by how hard it hit me. I ate a pint of ice cream about it.”

      I wonder how many times someone accomplished a fake death and just disappeared and nobody ever knew the truth that the person wasn’t real.

    • Medium | Adaobi Adibe | 8/4/20 | 3 min
      8 reads3 comments
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      Medium
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      💯✌️💥 Oh wow yes! Breezy and delightful. Deep, but delightful.

    • blog.codinghorror.com | 4 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Applicable to life beyond programming too. Loved it.

    • Vox | Sean Illing | 5/2/19 | 14 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Humans don’t scale.

      Time and attention are finite.

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 10/6/16 | 26 min
      7 reads6 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Reposting. This is the paragraph that I can’t stop thinking about:

      Reading through the Roman bot’s responses, it’s hard not to feel like the texts captured him at a particularly low moment. Ask about Stampsy and it responds: “This is not [the] Stampsy I want it to be. So far it’s just a piece of shit and not the product I want.” Based on his friends’ descriptions of his final years, this strikes me as a candid self-assessment. But I couldn’t help but wish I had been talking to a younger version of the man — the one who friends say dreamed of someday becoming the cultural minister of Belarus, and inaugurating a democratically elected president with what he promised would be the greatest party ever thrown.

      It’s crazy to think that we are what we say, but that’s what this has me thinking — that we are the words we use. And it makes me want to use more positive language, everywhere. I’m horrified to think of what a bot of me would say if it was trained on the language I’ve been using for the last few months. Lots of practical life lessons in this article, and in all real life sci-fi stories like this.

      Totally my jam, I can’t recommend this enough.

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 10/6/16 | 26 min
      7 reads6 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Fascinating. 🆙👍✅

    • The Guardian | 8/1/20 | 7 min
      4 reads1 comment
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      The Guardian
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Interesting, but I think I oppose any organization that solely exists to create negative ads. I'm not even sure if this helps or hurts Trump.

    • The Guardian | James Nestor | 7/26/20 | 11 min
      25 reads10 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I did some slow breathing in a huge empty church this morning and it was awesome.

    • The New Yorker | Jonathan Franzen | 5/15/05 | 14 min
      6 reads2 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Every single word of this short story is absolutely perfect.

    • The Guardian | James Nestor | 7/26/20 | 11 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Inspiring. Breath is the key to life.

    • The New Yorker | Joshua Rothman | 11/11/16 | 13 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Wow. This profile on Charles Taylor was published in the immediate aftermath of Trump’s 2016 election. In the age of COVID, I think it’s even more relevant than ever.

      In Taylor’s view, cool disengagement is a fiction; an ardent search for goodness is the human reality. “We all seek a sense of what it would be like to be fully connected to something. We all have a sense of what really living, and not just existing, would be.”

      Because of our giant leap backwards into something that feels, day in and out, like dystopia, that “sense” is now a historical one, and it’s clearer than ever. I, for one, can’t stop thinking about the past, about what could have been.... An impromptu, guilt-free party. The neighbors popping by to say hello. Travel. Spontaneity. Smiling in public. Laughter. Sex with a stranger. Live music. A happy, wasted day. Adventure.

      Was all of that real? Was life really that good? And are things that bad now? Yes. Yes. Yes.

      And it’s all self-inflicted. We’re doing this to ourselves and we don’t have to. The darkest thought of all is that we humans don’t want reality any more. It’s too scary, too unpredictable. We feel safer when we’re told to wear a mask, stay inside, stay away from others.

      I know what I want, I keep telling myself. But do I really? Despite my best efforts, I too keep checking out, giving up. And God knows I know how to gaslight myself. So now I’m asking myself:

      How do I know that I want to be free? How free do I want to be? How much do I care about this experiment called democracy? And is it worth my whole entire life?

    • Raptitude.com | 7/7/20 | 4 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Read. Read diverse opinions and alternative perspectives. Read to expand your worldview and challenge your assumptions.

      This stuff is SO obvious it feels borderline condescending. (Didn’t we all learn this in primary school?) But I guess the reminder is important since the web works against our best efforts with this stuff.

    • Andreessen Horowitz | 12/10/19 | 12 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago
    • palladium magazine | Isaac Wilks | 4/30/20 | 14 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Optimistic and enthusiastic writing from (go figure!) an undergrad.

    • BuzzFeed News | Ryan Mac | 7/23/20 | 24 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      This stuff makes my head spin. I just left a long comment on another anti-Facebook article.

      Basically: I couldn’t care less about how Facebook moderates itself. And I think it’s embarrassing that the employees there get so hot and bothered about individual posts, although I guess it makes them feel better about themselves and the work they do. I’m more disappointed in the journalists who are missing the real story.

      We need more complexity and nuance in these discussions. Facebook is harmful in a very specific way that almost nobody is talking about.

      1. Update (7/28/2020):

        Just re-read this comment. Parts of it sound angrier than I actually feel.

        To clarify: the FB employees I'm referring to are the ones in the article who are concerned about hate in individual posts. This peeves me. (For example, the one with the triangle that is probably some kind of underground hate symbol.) Facebook employees should be more worried about how Facebook itself is amplifying precisely this kind of nightmare content - by design, at scale.

        The left and right are both in a death spiral of deepening hatred and social media itself is fanning the flames.

        I guess my main thing is: It's not the posts. It's the platforms. We need to treat the disease, not the symptoms.

    • The New Yorker | Tim Wu | 8/21/15 | 5 min
      42 reads14 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      “There must be a better way.”

    • The New Yorker | Hari Kunzru | 8/6/07 | 13 min
      11 reads5 comments
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      The New Yorker
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Hilarious, weird, edgy, smart. This is one of my all time favorite short stories. I was twenty-one when it appeared in The New Yorker, almost thirteen years ago.

      For a while, I couldn’t track it down. But this morning, randomly, the title (Magda Mandela) came back to me in a flash. Funny how memory works! I get so stoked when this happens.

      Enjoy! 😉

    • The New York Times Company | David Brooks | 7/23/20 | 4 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      A president who dispenses with the pen inevitably takes up the club.

    • The New York Times Company | NOAH GALLAGHER SHANNON | 7/22/20 | 33 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Thrilling and thoughtful. A look at our changing, intensifying weather from the same author who wrote that great one about the Pinkertons

    • The New York Times Company | LESLIE KEAN, RALPH BLUMENTHAL | 7/23/20 | 5 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      👾👽👾

    • The New Yorker | Masha Gessen | 7/21/20 | 6 min
      28 reads6 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago
    • WIRED | Jane Metcalfe | 7/5/20 | 9 min
      6 reads3 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Aiight. Let’s roll. Three cheers to sci fi for pointing the way!

    • WIRED | WIRED Staff | 5/29/19 | 19 min
      5 reads3 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Wow. Inspiring. The writing and the adventure. Beautiful. 10.

      Uncanny resemblance to my pre-COVID adventures.

    • taibbi.substack.com | Matt Taibbi | 7/20/20 | 17 min
      18 reads6 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago
    • The New York Times Company | Eric Margolis | 7/17/20 | 12 min
      1 read1 comment
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      “It’s not real.”

      “We need to change things.”

    • Ben Werdmüller | Ben Werdmüller | 7/20/20 | 3 min
      22 reads10 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Smart words, clearly written, from @benwerd. Let's not panic, but let's be ready for anything... and keep reading!

      The crazy part about Russian "interference" is that all they need to do is make lots of people (dem, repubs, and the other 60% of the country that won't even vote) really confused about the results of the election. If it happens, it'll be so weird and horrifying. Given how constantly confused we are about everything right now, none of this seems far-fetched to me.

      Facebook, Twitter, and a small handful of BUMMER companies (I'm borrowing Jaron Lanier's acronym - Bummer: "Behaviors of Users Modified and Made into an Empire for Rent.”) are putting democracy in the USA at risk. Russia doesn't even have to break any laws or rules to use these platforms to spread confusion. It's quite easy. I would imagine that it's also a fun project to be working on, but that requires a huge leap of my imagination, a la:

      I am born and raised in Russia // I grew up with cold winters and food shortages // I'm an excellent coder and I worked my way up to an intelligence position with the government where I'm paid to kick it with an extremely smart group of hackers, drink vodka, and figure out ways to use social media to fuck up the US election.

      Beyond thrilling. I'd probably want to be put on the Twitter-infiltrating team, because that's where the media hangs out and where the biggest, most influential narratives are shaped.

      The craziest part of this, to me, is the way that Facebook and Twitter make people nuts (specifically: angry, confused) even without Russian interference. (I'm stifling an "lol" because man this is all so crazy!) Like, the entire Russian strategy might literally just be: enhance the effect that Twitter is having on society. And global order really does hang in the balance, but it's hard to see on a day to day basis. Once you see it, you can't unsee it. At least that's been my experience. Anyway: The best way to counter Russian interference is to get everyone on Readup!

      I watched some of the Chris Wallace interview. I think Trump's brain is actually quite easily hackable and being hacked, by one real echo-chamber (his human surroundings) and a bunch of virtual ones, some of which are owned by Russia. His addiction to Twitter, so prominently on display, is going to be a fascination to future generations. It will only make sense given the context: The media industry itself is also addicted to Twitter.

      As trust in literally everything (institutions, science, data, journalism, social media) continues to plummet, society will increasingly recognize and reward the value that readers create for the world. Readers are the best bet there is right now.

    • Science of Us | Andrew Sullivan | 7/17/20 | 8 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Upvote.

      Go, Andrew, go!

    • WIRED | WIRED Staff | 12/1/97 | 17 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Yes! You are what you pay attention to.

      As I write this comment, I have a choice to make: I can spend 45 minutes writing it, or I can spend just 5 minutes. Or 5 seconds. In turn, you, reader, can ignore it, or spend 1 minute reading it, or you can read and re-read it and meditate on it for much longer. There’s really no upper limit. We make these choices day in and day out, but without nearly enough intentionality.

      Sometimes I look at one line from a poem for hours. It’s because the words are worth it. And because I can feel the depth of meaning. I can feel that the poet, in turn, put so much time and thought (meaning: attention) into it. And I want to explore every single decision, down to the punctuation marks, in detail, because I know that each decision was considered with great attention.

      Attention = thought x time = life

      When you tell someone “pay attention to what you pay attention to” you are actually saying “have a good life.”

      Readup is interesting because for the first time ever we have a chance to see what other people are paying attention to. There’s no other platform on the web that does that. The result is a profoundly special community.

    • Vanity Fair | Jessica Hopper with Sasha Geffen and Jenn Pelly | 9/30/19 | 52 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Man, this was extremely inspiring. I read it this morning and spent a lot of the day thinking about how awesome the Lilith Fair must have been. Sarah McLachlan is a legend.

    • The New Yorker | Elif Batuman | 4/23/18 | 52 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Looks like this whole thing is getting the Werner Herzog treatment: Family Romance, LLC

      This is still one of my favorite articles of all time on Readup.

    • The Cut | MATTHEW SCHNEIER | 4/30/20 | 7 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Yes.

      Except this:

      Still, to admit to liking poetry is faintly embarrassing.

      No. Not that.

      But everything else — yes

    • twain.lib.virginia.edu | 23 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      What a surprise delight!! High satire from the olden days, written by the original king of word-comedy in the USA, Mark Twain. I giggled from beginning to end of this one.

      Basically, Mark Twain takes a huge dump on James Fenimore Cooper. It’s so damn funny because it’s thoughtful and meticulously written. (You don’t need to know anything about Twain or Cooper to enjoy this.)

      Three cheers. These days, we frown on “harsh burns” - for good reason - but it’s nice to imagine Cooper responding with ink/parchment, something like: ”Twain my dude, what an EPIC roast. Miss you bud. Kisses -Coop”

      1. Update (7/17/2020):

        Apparently Cooper characters are always stepping on dry twigs lol:

        “It is a restful chapter in any book of his when somebody doesn't step on a dry twig and alarm all the reds and whites for two hundred yards around. Every time a Cooper person is in peril, and absolute silence is worth four dollars a minute, he is sure to step on a dry twig. There may be a hundred other handier things to step on, but that wouldn't satisfy Cooper. Cooper requires him to turn out and find a dry twig; and if he can't do it, go and borrow one.”

    • The New Yorker | Gideon Lewis-Kraus | 7/9/20 | 32 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Excellent!

    • The Atlantic | Margaret Sullivan | 7/14/20 | 6 min
      5 reads3 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Yikes. It feels so weird to be rooting for democracy, but that’s where we are right now.

    • The Outline | Austin L. Ray | 8/15/19 | 6 min
      30 reads22 comments
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      Lol, whoaaaa. Remember when days of the week were a thing?!

      This feels so so ancient yet it’s so so not.

    • Reuters | William James | 7/16/20 | 2 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      This is confusing and jarring on many levels.

      Why isn't the fight against COVID a humanity-wide, global effort? That shocks me. It's hard for me to even think about the political warfare happening underneath that larger, bigger human failure.

      If I was the president of any nation on Earth right now I would absolutely have hackers working day and night to get as much medical and scientific information as possible by any means necessary in order to save lives and prevent ongoing calamity. (Isn't every country in the world currently doing this?)

      Also: Twitter got hacked to shit today. Oops :P That's a bigger story.

    • Spike Art Magazine | 7/15/20 | 10 min
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      bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      🤯