1. Join Readup to read with Pegeen.

    Pegeen
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    • Lithub | Jackie Polzin | 4/2/21 | 6 min
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      2 hours ago

      For the past 9 years, my older sister and I have been writing letters (hour long e-mails) to each other every day. It started as a way of sharing a passion for art. She was fascinated by process, so I would take pictures and explain each step of my finished piece. Then I asked to see some of her poetry, which had been published over the 30 years of her dedication but not too long ago abandoned for her love of horses. We had always been close but she never lived within car distance during my lifetime. Our visits were always holiday gatherings and delightfully chaotic due to her growing family. Now in our old age we have time, that incredibly precious commodity. Over the years, our letters became more intimate, more personal and revealing. The trust we cultivated allowed such depth and breadth of our exchanges. We are containers for each other’s most inner thoughts, desires and feelings. There is nothing we can’t talk about, knowing the other is there as a loving presence, a compassionate witness to our own internal process. Having a best friend, who is also a sister who shares my history, is a gift beyond measure.

    • Science of Us | Anonymous . | 4/12/21 | 12 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      14 hours ago

      This is very interesting because I was not the least bit offended by this woman’s reaction. I felt it was an honest stream of consciousness musing about how her life may change do to such an extraordinary turn of events. Even that it made sense given her family background. I’ll be very interested in what others think. I don’t feel there is a right or wrong reaction to this - just different.

    • HerStry | 11 min
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      18 hours ago

      This is such a delightful throw back to my youth, my own innocence. My parents never told me anything, as-if knowing about my body would cause me to discover all the pleasures that would lead to a life of sinful debauchery. Thank God for my best neighborhood friend Tess, two years my senior. Her parents were rumored to be communists. Her mom was a welder by trade, an artist by heart. She had hairy armpits and free swinging breasts. A studio upstairs with works on easels and strewn around the floor’s perimeter and unmade bed. There were cinderblocks supporting a red vellore couch, torn oriental rugs, dishes piled high by the sink. It was in this deliciously unstructured, uninhibited home that I got some of my best and most valuable education. Tess and I are still friends. We laugh a lot when we get together. It’s invaluable to have such a rich, meaningful history with someone.

    • nightowlinkwell.wordpress.com | 4/15/21 | 8 min
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      1 day ago

      Congratulations DellwoodBarker! It takes such courage to put your writing “out there.” I love stories with depth and soul - insights into one’s own life experiences. Your comments, in and of themselves, have been really interesting and a glimpse into your unique and sensitive worldview. Expanding into sharing short stories on Readup is a wonderful adventure to explore. I look forward to witnessing the evolution of your creative journey. Bravo!

    • The New York Times Company | Emi Nietfeld | 4/7/21 | 7 min
      29 reads8 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 days ago

      I so appreciate articles like this because it’s a different work scenario than I ever experienced growing up in the mid 70’s. There were clear cut rules and regulations, chain of command, responsibilities. My work was separate from the rest of my life. I can appreciate how Google created a utopian “family” environment that would appeal to many who lacked that kind of support. And I clearly see the serious danger inherent in its structure. Unfortunately, sexual harassment was endemic back in my day also. Infuriating!

    • Slate | Kelsy Burke | 3/23/21 | 8 min
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      ScoutScribe
      2 days ago

      Highly recommend this article. Extremely insightful and disturbing.

    • jacobian.org | 5 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 days ago

      I loved how this author wrote something about the tech world that I found fascinating! That’s magic in my book.

    • CNN | Mia Alberti and Jack Guy, CNN | 4/9/21 | 2 min
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      4 days ago

      This is SO exciting! I hope they have this documented on the History Channel. I want to see it all. I was in college when I went to see a good friend in Washington DC. It happened to correlate with the traveling exhibit of the King Tut discoveries. I will never forget the complete and utter awe I felt. What brilliant artisans! How was it possible that they created such items without modern day tools? The details were amazing. The pyramids must be insanely magnificent in person.

    • The New York Times Company | SARAH LYALL | 4/3/21 | 8 min
      25 reads7 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      5 days ago

      Beyond a 10 - so glad it’s AOTD! How I have somewhat managed this pandemic is keeping my perspective - my gratitude practice. I am retired with adult children who are healthy and managing well. I have a Reiki community where we are committed daily to reaching out to those who are really struggling with their crisis - be it serious health issues, financial issues, loneliness, depression. Helping others really kept me focused on how much worse this was for them - and that I could offer support. And even with all of this perspective, I can SO relate to what this author is saying. When I felt untethered, I asked my community for help. Dear god, this is not something one can manage alone. Going forward, I feel community will be the new black.

      1. Update (4/13/2021):

        Ha, I just realized this was not AOTD! Okay, I predict it will be tomorrow’s!

    • USA TODAY | Gregg Doyel | 10 min
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      ScoutScribe
      6 days ago

      Compelling read! And a great reminder.

    • The New York Times Company | Olga Khazan | 4/6/21 | 7 min
      25 reads12 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      “It unsettled her that her regular life so closely resembled quarantine.” What a great opening statement, one that causes introspection and examination. Perhaps that is the silver lining. I really loved Catherine Steffel’s process of going about her changes due to such incredible loss. I applaud her dedication to recreating herself and new life. That takes courage.

    • Ever Widening Circles | 9/21/19 | 5 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I was inspired to research more about Indian art from an article that Ruchita Ganurkar posted. What a delight to stumble upon this! The idea of bringing home with you wherever you go is inspiring. These trucks are stellar - just amazing! And I have to say, all my spaces, including my own body and the way I dress, is reflective of my life’s journey. Of what’s important to me. Art invites, connects and uplifts, ignites the child, the wonder, awe and curiosity. Play. Art is a magical, alchemical healing balm. Love #ConspiracyofGoodness - just what we need!

    • Business Insider | Hillary Hoffower | 4/8/21 | 5 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago
    • Believer Magazine | 4/1/21 | 22 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I really enjoyed this article, how it unfolded, the intertwining of the author’s feelings with the works of the artist Kusama. Crushes are an initiation, of sorts, perhaps even a necessary part of our growth. In my 65 years of living, I have had crushes and they were as dramatic as depicted in this author’s article. And it’s the drama, the heightened sense of every aspect of my life while in the “crush state,” that seems to be what I loved the most. Over time, the crush state became a way of life for me. No longer needing a person as initiator of my heightened state, life itself became my muse. Opening to receive this magical perception has changed me. Intimacy arrives on long walks in nature, in my paying deep attention to where I am, in listening attentively to what the wind is saying. I have such a crush on silence.

    • The New York Times Company | Jason Farago | 4/5/21 | 10 min
      6 reads4 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I have always been drawn to the fabulous colors, clothing and culture of India. Exotic is the most apt word - other worldly. I have several stunning long wrap around skirts made from Indian saris. These paintings are gorgeous. Recently I was given a treasure when my aunt passed away. It was her 1969 Metropolitan Museum Engagement Calendar depicting the illustrations of The Khamsa of Nizami by the artist Shaikh-Zada. The paintings are rich in color and detail, just like the ones pictured in this article. Breathtaking.

    • Science Focus | Frankie Macpherson | 1/27/21 | 4 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago
    • The New York Times Company | VIVIAN WANG, Joy Dong | 4/2/21 | 7 min
      11 reads12 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      OMG, what a fantastic story to begin my day! The courage of this woman is astounding! So many cultures feel that “living for yourself” is a very selfish philosophy. But I think it’s because so many depend on being taken care of by women. Living for yourself creates a self that is empowered, passionate and full of creative energy. It is only from this place of inner resources that anyone can authentically give love, compassion, understanding and joy. It would be a different world if all women cared deeply for themselves first.

    • GQ | Gabriella Paiella | 3/31/21 | 7 min
      6 reads2 comments
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      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I LOVE this woman’s passion and curiosity! I also loved Frazier and she has reignited my interest. Maybe my next series after West Wing! I also did the complete series of The Larry Sanders Show, which was phenomenal! It’s so much fun to go back in time and view these classics.

    • Vice | 15 min
      22 reads11 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I’m a HUGE fan of parapsychology. So many interesting books on the subject. My first was Many Lives, Many Masters by Dr. Brian Weiss. He was a psychiatrist who had a patient talk about her past life traumas while under hypnosis. As a prominent scientist he was really resistant to such “nonsense” but eventually could not deny the remarkable journey he was drawn into. A page turner for sure. Life After Life was another great book by Dr. Raymond Moody that chronicles the near death experiences of his patients. And now we have Quantum Physics that is the bridge between the scientific and spiritual worlds. We are living in really interesting times!

    • Vice | 15 min
      22 reads11 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago
    • UPLIFT | 3/11/21 | 9 min
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      2 weeks ago

      “A modern culture may know of the unseen wisdom of the spirit world, and that there are natural systems of vast impeccable intelligence at work, yet if it is not in our daily language it is not alive within us.” I find such truth in this article. It’s why I love studying the shamans and Native American practices. To be part of a community that honors rituals as a practice to keep such meaningful and sacred information alive within. This keeps me grounded, mindful and aware of myself, my vibration and how I am showing up each day. Am I part of the solution or the problem?

    • The New Yorker | Justin Torres | 7/21/14 | 15 min
      7 reads4 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Gorgeous writing, swept me along effortlessly. It’s in the details, like I was witness to it all. Love how it was told, in reverse, bringing such depth and sorrow to this love story. Definitely a writer to watch out for.

    • americanpurpose.com | Katherine C. Epstein | 3/26/21 | 50 min
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      2 weeks ago

      “A hallmark of maturity, in both person and nation, is the willingness to live with moral complexity. When we build walls among ourselves for fear of moral contamination, should we be surprised that we elect a president whose signature issue is a wall? Our ability to accept moral complexity in others is tied to our ability to accept it in ourselves. An inability to accept it in ourselves, is tied to an inability to accept it in others.” I felt deliriously drunk on sanity while reading this. What a start to my day! A MUST read for all. Praise be for Readup!

    • Pocket | 1 min
      7 reads2 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Fantastic formula. I have to laugh because I did not do that recently with an article about “woo woo” energy practices. I got triggered and defensive. However, the person that posted the article replied in this manner of approach. And I so appreciated noticing the difference and admitting it. I usually see the good first and understand where the person could be coming from. It’s a much more involved process but a very powerful way to communicate for both people involved. You can bet I’ll go take a walk next time I’m triggered and want to respond immediately.

    • GQ | Doug Bock Clark | 7/23/18 | 54 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      This was brutal. The ending was a shock. Still puzzling over it.

    • Raptitude.com | 3/22/21 | 6 min
      25 reads12 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      First, “woo woo” is such a moronic term - immature and ignorant. Secondly, science has drastically changed over the years especially since Quantum Physics arrived on the scene. How can anyone ever think Nature is not perfect or the body not brilliant and capable of healing itself? Living in harmony with the natural world, eating whole, unprocessed foods, drinking plenty of clean water, disconnecting from the toxic overstimulation of social media, moving our bodies in ways we enjoy, having deep, meaningful friendships, doing purposeful work that serves the greater good, all promotes a vital, passionate, connected and healthy life. Taking walks in nature, growing a garden, book clubs, taking any type of class, doing art, cooking, volunteering - it’s all healing. We are energy, everything is energy. You can develop a deep relationship with your energy (Life force) and become skillful at using it to heal yourself and others. It’s a skill, takes practice and dedication. Meditation and mindfulness helps to harness the power of our minds, to connect to our powerful heart and learn how to respond to life in loving, compassionate and caring ways. To think we already know everything shuts down our curiosity, our wonder, our growth and expansion. Massage, chiropractic, acupuncture, biofeedback, hypnosis, aromatherapy all at one time were considered “woo woo.” Reiki is now included in hospital and Hospice programs because it promotes a deep sense of peace and calm. It’s used before and after surgery and various treatments such as chemotherapy. A loving touch, when delivered with intention and attention, is extremely powerful. After a year of sheltering in place, we have learned how desperate we are for touch, for connection, for love, for family and friends. I do not think our society is a good advertisement for the argument of science vs “woo woo.” Look at the indigenous cultures, the “blue zones” where our modern day diseases don’t even exist. How sad that we are so suspicious of our own innate Power and that of our natural world.

    • bookbear express | Ava | 3/28/21 | 4 min
      34 reads10 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      LOVE this! Agree 100%!

    • YourTango | Caroline Maguire | 3/19/21 | 5 min
      6 reads3 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      I remember teaching my kids “The Golden Rule” - treat others the way you wish to be treated. I think it’s simple and relatable. Also, “what you give out, comes back to you.” I also strongly agree with open ended questions to prompt introspection and mindfulness. And lastly, it’s up to me, or any parent, to model the behavior they wish to instill in their children, it’s really the best teacher.

    • journals.stfm.org | 4 min
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      3 weeks ago

      The body is always seeking homeostasis, that’s its job. Slow medicine requires paying attention to all areas of your life, not just the physical. It requires the person to take responsibility in their healing process. Patience is needed as well as change in unhealthy habits - and not just dietary. Unfortunately, our culture is too distracted, too busy, too disconnected for such an approach. Until enough people demand the slow medicine approach, it will always be out of network and expensive.

    • The New Yorker | Jen Spyra | 3/12/21 | 11 min
      11 reads3 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Really enjoyed this series. A fun escape. And a girl can dream, can’t she?

    • The New Yorker | Jen Spyra | 3/11/21 | 12 min
      11 reads2 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Totally hooked!

    • The New Yorker | Jen Spyra | 3/10/21 | 13 min
      18 reads6 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Wow, heart pounding thriller! This was like my eyes consuming each word in machine gun pace. Original and captivating. Definitely reading the other parts. I’m sensing this man is not real - ha!

    • The Conversation | J. Alexander Navarro | 3/23/21 | 6 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      This is eerie. To think we are here, yet again, and still behaving somewhat the same, is daunting. Where is the learning curve? Where is the realization that we can’t just be concerned about ourselves?

    • Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Good suggestions for all ages. I only had a problem with one catchphrase - “All I can do is try my best.” I don’t like the word try, it sounds too noncommittal and already giving yourself an out. I think it would be much stronger and more committed to say “I can do this!” Or “I’m all in!” There’s enthusiasm, desire and confidence in these statements, a belief in yourself and your own unique potential. I was a personal trainer. A lot of people can’t afford the necessary 3 sessions it takes to see real positive changes and results. Three days is the minimum - there’s no wiggle room. Three days also guarantees that you won’t get hurt, like weekend warriors often do. So I would say to them as they were leaving, “Make sure you get that third day in.” And almost always they would say, “I’ll try.” And 9 times out of 10, they failed. So I banned the word “try” from their vocabulary. I would always make them repeat it in a declarative, positive and empowered sentence out loud. And I suggested that they add the reason why. For instance, “I’ll make sure it happens because I know my success depends on it.” Or my health depends on it, or my goals depend on it. Words are SO important and have real power. Choose them wisely.

    • The Atlantic | Mark Bowden | 2/6/18 | 13 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      OMG, you must read this - beyond a 10! Larry Smarr is the Picasso of being the CEO of your body! This is SO cool and is a peek into the future of medicine. This is Star Trek material. Beam me up Bones!

    • The New York Times Company | May Jeong | 3/20/21 | 8 min
      11 reads3 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Ignorance is not bliss, it’s a choice not to open to what is being shown to us that is really difficult to face. I can’t help but feel we are living in a time of “shadow revelation.” We tend to be afraid of the dark, yet we know that it’s only within the dark that we can find the light. How I choose to respond will be unique to me, to each one of us. In my work as an Energy Practitioner, my practice is to open myself to the wisdom of my Heart Center, where I find Truth and Creativity. This Inner Intelligence guides me, helps me to go beyond my old cultural limiting beliefs and enter into the Field of Infinite Possibilities. And I have a beautiful community in which to do this, to find support and more expansive ideas. More and more, I realize that my mind is limited, my heart expansive. It’s no longer “me” but “we.” I know that is as cliche as the line, “we are all connected” or “we are all one.” Laugh if you want to, think it’s Pollyanna corniness, but I have found those words, those sayings to have a depth of meaning that is profound. A call to action of some kind, of realizing that each individual is actually me. I remember someone asked Mother Teresa, How on earth did you work with the poor in India for your entire life? And she replied something to the affect that each face was the face of Jesus.

    • Medium | Benjamin Hardy, PhD | 4/3/17 | 2 min
      39 reads8 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Short but impactful. Agree 100%.

    • UPLIFT | 3/17/21 | 3 min
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      As I read this, I could feel the “helper’s high” because I have experienced that so many times in my own life. Whether it’s witnessing the kind act or preforming it myself, my eyes well, my breathing deepens, my chest expands and I feel so full of love, gratitude and connection. It’s the best feeling in the world. And so easy to make happen. Spreading love is pure revolutionary magic.

    • Nir and Far | 10/8/20 | 7 min
      3 reads1 comment
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      In 1976 Gail Sheehy debuted a ground breaking book entitled Passages. It was a road map of predictable adult life crises beginning at age 20 through their 50’s. Up until then, the only real charting of life stages were infants and children. I was 20 at the time and going through a major passage and this book really helped me to make a major decision - to leave a relationship with a man I loved but knew was not the man I was going to spend the rest of my life with. He was older and wanted to get married. And that was very common back then. Things were more predicable and linear, like this article points out. And I think it’s good to have this perspective of how life has REALLY changed and this model completely outdated. A linear life can be so narrow, cause a kind of sleepwalking through life, perhaps even doing more of what’s expected than what one actually deeply desires. I love the new model - more diverse, open ended and exciting. I think this book by Feiler is very important and will help a lot of people navigate their own “lifequakes.”

    • TRT World | TRTWorld | 3/18/21 | 2 min
      20 reads9 comments
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      Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago