1. Join Readup to read with Pegeen.

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    • The Atlantic | Caitlin Flanagan | 5/5/20 | 10 min
      3 reads3 comments
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      The Atlantic
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      Pegeen11 hours ago

      Perspective is everywhere and a gateway to extreme gratitude if you care to look around. And I care to, every day, because there is always something bright and beautiful in the storm of sadness and overwhelm. Right when the sheltering in place happened, I heard an owner of a business, that I frequent, just got diagnosed with breast cancer. It has stayed with me, this perspective, and the many others I have viewed/read about since. It could always be worse - always. It could be dying alone in a hospital. Surrounded by others dying alone. Read this article if you are having a bad day.

    • Organizer Sandbox | Gabrielle Sloss | 5/20/20 | 7 min
      4 reads3 comments
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      Organizer Sandbox
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      Pegeen1 day ago

      I have personally found all of this to be true. Accepting, leaning in, opening to discomfort/pain and uncertainty help it to move through me. It’s a process that requires being alone in silence, allowing the time needed for transmutation.

    • The Guardian | Afua Hirsch | 5/21/20 | 4 min
      17 reads6 comments
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      The Guardian
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      Pegeen2 days ago

      I tend to agree with Rajoelina’s estimation that many nations have a patronizing attitude towards African innovation. “If it was a European country that had actually discovered this remedy, would there be so much doubt?” Their numbers are impressive and speak for themselves. And I, for one, would LOVE a herbal remedy. I have a functional medicine doctor who uses pharmaceutical grade herbal remedies and they work exceptionally well without all the harmful side affects of lab made drugs.

    • The New York Times Company | CHRISTINE HAUSER, Derrick Bryson Taylor, Neil Vigdor | 5/26/20 | 8 min
      5 reads3 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen3 days ago

      My husband I watch the 6:30pm channel 7 world news with David Muir most nights. We saw this video last night and both of us were SO freaked out! It was beyond horrifying. I had to look away, it was that disturbing. There is NO way the police should get away with this one - caught on camera; other officers standing by watching; bystanders pleading for the officer to release his knee hold; the poor victim gasping for air, pleading that he could not breathe. There is NO justification. Even if this man was armed - which they say he wasn’t - it doesn’t justify the brute force. He was already on the ground, handcuffed and not a risk. I honestly could hardly fall asleep last night with the image in my mind. I feel SO badly for the family and friends of this man. I know the officers in question have been fired. They should be charged with murder. The FBI is investigating.

    • The New York Times Company | BENJAMIN MUELLER | 5/25/20 | 8 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen3 days ago

      WOW! This is such an outrage! And in a pandemic, you do not get to physically check on your loved one. It’s a heartbreaking situation. This is such a truism: “It’s money before care all the time.”

    • Human Parts | Vanessa Smith Bennett | 3/20/18 | 4 min
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      Human Parts
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      Pegeen3 days ago

      Emotions as messengers - yes! I agree, they should never be suppressed. The journey to knowing oneself is both fascinating and humbling. And well worth the effort.

    • ScienceAlert | Peter Dockrill | 3 min
      2 reads1 comment
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      ScienceAlert
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      Pegeen3 days ago

      Complicated, to say the least! North and south poles “flipping”? A vast dense rock under Africa called the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province - amazing the mysteries of Nature!

    • Longreads | 5/20/20 | 14 min
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      Pegeen4 days ago

      Ha! Foreplay rules! It’s the “wanting,” the tension of not having, the delay of any gratification, that’s hot - in my humble opinion. The slow build up, the nuanced gestures, really creative dialogue - all of it matters. Being present, in the moment, attending to each other. I remember a male friend complaining that his wife was frigid and she, when alone with me, confessing that her husband was a terrible lover and “taking matters into her own hands.” It’s an art, for sure. And foreplay should be an everyday way of living, not just prior to the “main event.”

    • The New York Review of Books | Sigrid Nunez | 20 min
      16 reads4 comments
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      The New York Review of Books
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      Pegeen5 days ago

      I found this author’s subject matter and his analysis fascinating. Sex is an interesting topic but is not one I care to read about when a writer is not coming from a place of self love. There’s too much to be “worked out” psychologically when one is abused young in life and so the relationships tend to further the punishment and shame. I find that difficult to endure as a reader - no matter how well constructed and poetic the writer is.

    • The New York Times Company | Jonathan Safran Foer | 5/21/20 | 8 min
      35 reads39 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen5 days ago

      This IS a very emotional topic, which is where I would like to enter the conversation. When I think about my own journey and experience with diet/food consumption, what I’m remembering is how much love I felt when eating and preparing food for myself and family. Whether I’m vegetarian or not is no longer the issue - more, it’s my feelings about my choices. I agree that any form of animal abuse is not good. There is no doubt that I would be taking in all the horrors and abuse, energy wise, from the food sourced in that environment. Which is why I always endeavor to choose only organic, humanely certified food sources. I do care about the animals, our environment and what’s best for all concerned. I am mindful of love in my choices - of loving myself, my family, my planet, my Source. There is such joy and celebration in food and I want that joy in all areas of the process.

    • The Guardian | Hermione Hoby | 7/28/14 | 7 min
      6 reads4 comments
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      The Guardian
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      Pegeen6 days ago

      Just listened to Baby and felt transported back in time, so innocent and mesmerizing. I could hear this in a David Lynch movie. What a captivating story, one with heart and delayed gratification.

    • Organizer Sandbox | Benjamin Hardy, PhD | 4/9/20 | 14 min
      26 reads5 comments
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      Organizer Sandbox
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      Pegeen1 week ago

      I think this article is about discipline. My parents were strict and I was raised within its structure - household chores, studying and good grades in school, working a job each summer etc. Of course initially I resented it but as I grew into an adult, I realized how it helped me to be organized and to prioritize. Discipline actually gave me more time, flexibility and freedom. It’s so valuable and I’m glad I learned it early, as a child, otherwise this article would seem overwhelming and impossible!

    • The New York Times Company | GINA KOLATA | 5/10/20 | 10 min
      20 reads6 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen1 week ago

      This is a depressing article. Even if/when this pandemic ends, another will be around the corner waiting. The line about bodies stacked “like cords of wood” really put the visual in gear, as did the pus oozing from sores that clung to sheets that, when the person is turned, rips all their skin off!

    • The New Yorker | Jonathan Franzen | 6/1/09 | 49 min
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      The New Yorker
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      Pegeen1 week ago

      Great characters and insights about the nature of neighborhood relationships. I could not stop reading this.

    • The Atlantic | McKay Coppins | 5/8/20 | 4 min
      32 reads3 comments
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      The Atlantic
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      Pegeen1 week ago
    • Seth's Blog | 3/25/17 | 1 min
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      Seth's Blog
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      Pegeen1 week ago

      I love the title. Reads like a poem. Focus is under appreciated. Such an essential skill.

    • scitechdaily | 5/13/20 | 3 min
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      scitechdaily
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      Pegeen1 week ago

      Fifteen years ago I was alerted by my Integrative Health Doctor that Vitamin D was the new star on the horizon for many essential health concerns such as immunity and bone density. My husband and I got our blood levels checked and started on a regimen. Vitamin D is a hormone and must be regulated by yearly blood screening. It is a myth that being in the sun for short amounts of time will get you the amount of D that you need. It would take so much more than that and you’d risk overexposure.

    • The Atlantic | Michael J. Sorrell | 5/15/20 | 6 min
      2 reads1 comment
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      The Atlantic
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      Pegeen1 week ago

      The tone of this article allowed me to breathe, take in the author’s words, feel his compassion. Yes, our educational institutions are going to go through huge changes. They have essentially ignored the problems for too long and now that is no longer an option. Covid 19 is making sure of it.

    • The New York Times Company | DAVE ITZKOFF | 5/4/20 | 13 min
      6 reads3 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen2 weeks ago

      I love Seinfeld - can still watch episodes that I’ve seen several times and laugh out loud. Definitely a favorite show from my past, a past that was as alive as Jerry’s material. I essentially grew up with him. Many of my life experiences contained similar characters and situations depicted on Seinfeld - so relatable. I hope Jerry continues to share his brilliant gift. I like looking at the world through his eyes. His partnership with Larry David, another favorite, was a dream team. Intelligent humor reflecting our unintelligent selves. Laughter is one of the best releases.

    • commentarymagazine.com | 5/6/20 | 4 min
      33 reads11 comments
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      commentarymagazine.com
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      Pegeen2 weeks ago
    • Organizer Sandbox | Gabrielle Sloss | 4/15/20 | 4 min
      7 reads4 comments
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      Organizer Sandbox
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      Pegeen2 weeks ago

      I truly embrace this way of life and practice it. I know the power and stability it brings. However, I am very compassionate to those who find this as new information and have lost their jobs and have young kids at home. This is an unprecedented time for us - with much uncertainty. Having acknowledged that, it is important to realize that change is certain and that it’s wise to learn skills to befriend it. Living in fear is hell. So I would hope that people would be willing, at some point, to try simple practices to deal with uncertainty like deep breathing, meditation, EFT (tapping) - all available for free on line. And can be done in as little as 5 minutes to start. Build from there. This is life and life will always be unpredictable. Because this is so important in life, I think we should be teaching these skills in grammar school - make it fun, easy and normal.

    • Atlas Obscura | Shoshi Parks | 5/8/20 | 12 min
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      Pegeen2 weeks ago

      I can’t get past the idea of shells and corn cobs as wipes! Fascinating that bidets were not mentioned. We bought one before the pandemic and there is no comparison. Any other means of cleansing now seems archaic. Long live the trees!

    • The Paris Review | Sabrina Orah Mark | 5/7/20 | 9 min
      72 reads17 comments
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      The Paris Review
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      Pegeen2 weeks ago

      REALLY creative storytelling, so much nuance. I’m going to search for some of her poetry. Love her imagination.

    • The New Yorker | Sarah Blackwood | 5/11/20 | 5 min
      15 reads7 comments
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      The New Yorker
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      Pegeen2 weeks ago

      Oh Alexa, what an incredible gift you have given to me!!!!!!!!!!! What a treasure, a discovery, an absolute gem! You have NO idea the impact this has had on me. I have been a devotee of the female nude for as long as I can remember. I find the female form interesting in all respects. As an artist, I have celebrated her in my own abstracted way over and over. I was a personal trainer and massage therapist and felt such admiration and awe in the many expressions of the female form. How miraculous our bodies, to endure all the complications of our hormonal rhythms and, of course, the grand opus, giving birth. It is disappointing that some men may never fully appreciate our deep complexities, our worth beyond the outward flesh. Thankfully we have each other. I’m truly blown away by how far ahead of her time Brigman was - a true visionary. What arduous work just to get to the locations to shoot. What strength, what devotion and passion.I LOVE the sepia tone of her photographs, the astounding sensuality, the blending of her subjects with the natural surroundings. I truly can’t say enough. This is a keeper and one story I will delve further into. I want to know more about Brigman and view more of her work. This has made my day! And Readup is SUCH a wild ride - yesterday I was having coffee with the Deadly Hornet and today wowed by an artist that I never heard of!!! Readup, you are a treasure, a bringer of delightful gifts and I pray each day for your success. You are SO needed!!! Can you feel my enthusiasm!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • The Outdoor Journal | 2/24/20 | 12 min
      7 reads6 comments
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      The Outdoor Journal
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      Pegeen2 weeks ago

      OMG, This is INSANE! As a person who is allergic to bees, my heart was pounding out of my chest. I started this article by first watching the link that Jeff supplied - it’s a horror! But like any horror, I could not stop watching! Then reading about Coyote Peterson calmed me down. It’s a real old fashioned success story of boy meets nature, falls in love and wants to share it with the world. The networks say no repeatedly to Coyote’s pitches for a show and so he perseveres, takes to the wild with his own crew in Ohio, his home town, and shares his adventures on YouTube. The rest is history. Love this story.

    • fs.blog | 4/28/12 | 20 min
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      Pegeen3 weeks ago

      Wow, this speech had such a heavy, conflicted undertone. One of DFW’s own struggle to have his mind be the servant instead of the master. I can feel his pain and knowing how he chose to end his life, perhaps he just couldn’t live the kind of freedom he felt was really important. “The really important kind of freedom involves attention and awareness and discipline, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them over and over in myriad, unsexy ways every day.”

    • The New York Times Company | TAFFY BRODESSER-AKNER | 5/6/20 | 41 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen3 weeks ago

      Really enjoyed reading about the iconic Method Actor Val Kilmer and what he has been up to since leaving Hollywood in 2015. I admired him as an actor, especially his portrayal of Jim Morrison. Seems he is obsessed with Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) and Mary Baker Eddy (founder of Christian Scientist Church) - two individuals I know little about. I was never a fan of Mark Twain. Found it really painful to read any of this adventures. I know nothing about Mary Baker Eddy but will certainly check her out. Val Kilmer’s memoir sounds promising.

    • The Atlantic | Derek Thompson | 4/27/20 | 22 min
      8 reads3 comments
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      The Atlantic
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      Pegeen3 weeks ago

      Excellent article. I agree with this observation: “In the decade after the Great Recession, American cities became very popular - and very expensive. Neighborhoods that were once jewel boxes of eccentricity became yuppie depots. Wealth elbowed out weirdness, and rents soared to suffocating levels that pushed out many of the families and stores that made cities unique.” That will be a silver lining - bringing back the weirdos - artists and counterculture! And cheaper rents.

    • The New Yorker | Miranda July | 6/4/07 | 15 min
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      The New Yorker
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      Pegeen3 weeks ago

      I was lost while reading this, totally carried along, seated across the isle from this couple. That’s what great writing is about - forgetting it’s words on paper and somehow feeling inside of it.

    • Aeon | Anna Machin | 1/17/19 | 18 min
      21 reads13 comments
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      Aeon
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      Pegeen3 weeks ago

      Interesting article. My father was the carbon copy of the dad in the movie A Christmas Story. He was involved in our lives but begrudgingly so. There was a level of tension that was disconcerting and made me fearful. Plus, he was the one who dealt the punishment, my mother warning me, “Wait till your father gets home!” However, in hindsight, he did teach me very important lessons: discipline; how to handle money; the value of education; how to study; do everything with excellence; respect others; how to clean and paint a home; be on time; drive; ride a bike. He did occasionally read to us at night, a time that softened him and that was special - to see him in a more sensitive state. I missed knowing him as a person. To engage in conversations of meaning as I got older and was on my own in the world. I had that relationship with my mother, who was much more nurturing, loving and fun. My first husband, the one I had children with, was an excellent father - very involved. My children have the kind of relationship with him that I wished I had with my dad. And I’m so glad they do - it’s awesome. I hope this is the coming trend - a blending/balancing of yin and yang in both parents. Equality in partnership and all roles of parenting.

    • Seth's Blog | 11/30/16 | 1 min
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      Pegeen3 weeks ago

      100% agree.

    • alexdanco.com | 11/10/15 | 4 min
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      Pegeen3 weeks ago

      WOW, I LOVE this - brilliant! I am definitely going to try this. Seems really inspired to me. Do the opposite - very George Castanza!

    • The New York Times Company | Virginia Heffernan | 4/23/09 | 6 min
      12 reads11 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen4 weeks ago

      I always read the comments on Readup - as fun and interesting as the articles themselves. Many times readers have recommended a book or link related to the article and I happily dive further into the subject matter. I’m not familiar with other reading sites but Readup seems to be an intelligent community intent on sharing and learning from one another. There are no trolls or combative, snarky comments. I feel safe and heard here.

    • that seems important | 4/30/20 | 11 min
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      Pegeen4 weeks ago

      Some really excellent points. I always found the first wave of feminism, my era, disturbing for the reasons given - women behaving like men to get ahead. It totally devalued women. This quote from Anne Marie Slaughter: “I suggest that real equality, full equality, does not just mean valuing women on male terms. It means creating a much wider range of equally respected choices for women and for men. And to get there, we have to change our workplace, our policies, and our culture.” This Corona Virus is forcing this change - wiping the slate clean. Picasso said all creation begins with destruction.

    • Slate | Scott Douglas | 3/12/18 | 5 min
      32 reads19 comments
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      Pegeen1 month ago

      I want this AOTD - it’s that important! My health care “team” of doctors all know about diet and exercise as a form of self care and “medicine”. They understand how movement, especially in nature, is essential to health. How what you eat, how you think, impacts all the trillion of cells in your body that are “listening” to you - that are the recipients of what you choose to feed them. When I broke both bones in my wrist 4 years ago (roller skating), my young doctor told me he would try his best to put it back together for me. I said that I NEEDED to be able to do pushups, since I did not like lifting weights. He never even questioned such a request, instead, he looked at me and said, I think I can guarantee that you will be able to do them on your knuckles, like in Karate (straight wrist). On the morning of my surgery, he came into the surgicenter with his nap sack on his back, having just left the gym. He said he felt great and was ready to give me back the use of my left hand, my dominant hand. I can now do full push ups, with no residual arthritis. I love feeling responsible for my health and for choosing a team whose values mirror my own.

    • Attention Activist | 3 min
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      Attention Activist
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      Pegeen1 month ago
    • The Story of Telling | Bernadette | 4/29/20 | 1 min
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      Pegeen1 month ago

      Yes! Love this. So true.

    • James Clear | 10/1/18 | 7 min
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      Pegeen1 month ago

      Solid advice.

    • n 1 | 4/7/20 | 9 min
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      Pegeen1 month ago

      I became physically ill after Superstorm Sandy. A side affect of my many infections was extreme anxiety. It felt as debilitating as the physical diseases. I had never been an anxious person, so this completely upended me. It also confused my many family members and friends. I was fortunate that they were all loving and compassionate during this time as I slowly found my way through this darkness. It has taken me 5 years of a multi-pronged approach to bring myself back to myself - albeit, a more expanded version of the former. I have found many practices to deal with my anxiety, namely EFT, meditation, different breathing techniques and Reiki sessions. It has felt like a miracle, a transformation and an awakening. I have complete compassion for anyone dealing with illnesses and anxiety. That is the silver lining that wraps around my heart. Just reading this article brought it all back and I could barely finish it. Each morning my Reiki group gathers virtually to send love and peace to the entire planet and all inhabitants. I believe in the calming, loving intent of group prayer. I can feel the energy pulsing in my hands and body. Wherever I manage to go during this sheltering in place, namely the food store, I look people in the eye, smile, say hello, engage in conversation - at a distance. It’s simple but powerful. And it makes me feel good to see others respond in like manner. Love and kindness will see us through. And must continue. We have to allow this experience to change us. If not, we are truly missing out on a great opportunity to heal globally.

    • The New York Times Company | Gabrielle Hamilton | 4/23/20 | 31 min
      22 reads17 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      Pegeen1 month ago

      I remember walking the streets of the East Village, that the Prune owner describes, over 40 years ago. Unique, exotic - a creative tapestry of weirdness that thrilled and delighted me. To have this jewel just an hour outside of Trenton, where I grew up, was amazing. I went often, first with friends, then my husband, then our children. Of course, over the years, the changes were glaring and disappointing - as most are when you covet the “character” of the individuals and businesses that create such an authentic stew. This was heartbreaking to read. - up close and personal. It’s insane to sit here and imagine my 24 year old self relishing this sacred place and not knowing today how NYC will look in the coming years. This pandemic has wiped the slate clean in a brutal, cold hearted way.