1. Join Readup to read with Jessica.

    Jessica
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    • The Atlantic | Melissa Fay Greene | 6/18/20 | 47 min
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      The Atlantic
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      Jessica1 week ago
    • TechCrunch | Greg Epstein | 6/13/20 | 21 min
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      Jessica2 weeks ago
    • Fortune | 6/16/20 | 17 min
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      Jessica2 weeks ago

      I want you to know how it feels to be the only one that looks like you in a conference room, in a meeting, at a networking event or happy hour. I want you to know what it feels like to constantly have to assimilate and ingratiate yourself in to another group's culture and way of doing things even though you're citizens of the same country. I want you to know what it feels like to not be able to stand up for yourself or correct someone's assumption about you or your culture or community for fear of losing your job. I want you to know what it's like to be effective in your role and have the same or more credentials as your peers, but be passed over for promotions because you're "too serious" or because there's a lack of connection. I want you to know what it feels like to desire to move up the ladder and see there are no other examples like you that you can follow. I want you to know what it feels like to see investments made, grace extended, sponsorship provided, risks taken, and opportunities given to and for others but not you. I want you to know the pressure that comes with trying to be perfect and represent your race well because if you make a mistake, the odds of you being given another opportunity are slim. I want you to know what it feels like to live, work, and raise your children in a world where you don't have the complexion for the connection or the protection.

    • app.spectator.co.uk | Rory Sutherland | 5/13/20 | 3 min
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      Jessica2 weeks ago

      A short but potent article.

      I've always been interested in complexity and the nuance that makes one idea/theory/situation different from another. What people are paying attention to in 2020 has provided a lot more avenues to explore complexity and sit with unfamiliar thoughts, ideas, and emotions.

      One reason it is useful to use virology as a model for behavioural adoption is that it teaches us that good ideas don’t always naturally become adopted any more than bad ideas immediately die out. (Wine boxes were an excellent idea.) What matters is often not their value but their transmissibility.

    • aaronzlewis.com | Aaron Z. Lewis | 22 min
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      Jessica2 weeks ago

      Wow! The title is "You can handle the post-truth" and the piece ends with:

      We’re not just post-truth, we’re pre- something else that’s yet to be determined. “Post-” is just what you call a transitional era while you’re trying to figure out what the hell is going on. It’s never the end of history. We’re going to grow whatever’s next out of this messy, surreal soil.

      One of the things that pains me the most is not knowing if what I'm reading online is legitimate and accurate. Outrage and tension make the headlines because those feelings tend to create stories that capture attention. How can we make sure that we are reading stories that cover multiple points of view, stories that do not just try to elicit outrage from readers? Where do we begin with curating that and filtering through the noise?

      I peeked at Lil Miquela's instagram profile and there are still so many comments wondering if Lil Miquela is "real" (even though in the bio clearly states Lil Miquela is a bot). The profile is strikingly similar to the feed of many public personalities.

      Some of my favorite snippets:

      To go meta is to study the way history has been (and is) written. It’s trying to understand the story of the stories we’ve told about ourselves. There’s no one narrative that rules them all, no one way to connect the dots from the past to the present.

      And strive to actively be part of the solution:

      I trust we’ll create a new mode of understanding that’s better fit for the surreality we live in — one that demands transparency and acknowledges that people are beginning to see through all the manipulative corporate PR.

    • Esquire | Esquire Editors | 8/2/17 | 44 min
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      Jessica3 weeks ago
    • 52 Insights | 5/10/20 | 18 min
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      Jessica1 month ago

      I recommend reading this in-browser from the original source to see the fantastic images and embedded videos with Oxman's work.

      Neri Oxman is, for the lack of a better phrase, an interdisciplinary thinker. The presentation of her work stimulates people from different backgrounds (i.e. "left or right brain"). In my opinion, her work is basically proof that though each individual is a speck of dust in the vastness of the universe, our life in itself is a beautiful miracle, one that has domino effects and affects another being ("being" as another organism or things constructed from resources we have on Earth).

      The key to our juggling multiple projects of numerous scales at once is to apply a systems-view perspective: global warming does not differentiate between buildings, cars, packaging or infrastructure; its inevitable impact is all-encompassing. Our design solutions should, likewise be universally relevant and applicable.

      What can be measured doesn’t count. It is only when what you’ve created requires its own system of quantification that you know you’re innovating. Novelty also requires suspending one’s disbelief, letting go of perceived judgement in order to truly become experimental. Even if we’re not ready, particularly then, we must move forward with measured foresight.

      We’re still very much in the conceptual and incubation phase of the digital biological revolution, the opportunities here are unfathomable, is there a particular aspect about this discussion we’re not having right now in society? Being kind to others. Without it, we are lost.

    • @coffeeandjunk | Abhishek Chakraborty | 5/14/20 | 4 min
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      Jessica1 month ago
    • Vanity Fair | Jesse Hyde | 3/24/20 | 21 min
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      Jessica3 months ago

      Land. It is what supports our homes, our communities. It is where we cultivate our food, build our cities. It is what we take for granted.

      This story is taking time to process.

    • CityLab | Richard Florida | 3/27/20 | 6 min
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      Jessica3 months ago
    • Jessica3 months ago

      This is fascinating. As is with most things, if vanadium is shown to be the most efficient and forward path to sustainable energy, the politicization and greed that may accompany such a precious resource may also be its downfall. How do we protect and best use our resources?

      Loved this analogy -

      Vanadium batteries can be a reservoir of energy much in the same way as we use actual reservoirs to store rainwater for later use

    • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences | 22 min
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      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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      Jessica3 months ago

      Dense. This is an academic paper. I’ve been thinking a lot about environmental history and what we can learn from our resilience to past disasters. What does research tell us?

      “..disasters forcefully unearth our differences and divisions, revealing, reproducing, and even exacerbating social and economic inequalities.” - Paul S. Sutter

      Public health, conservation, agricultural security, and economic development are deeply intertwined in ways that are not immediately obvious.

      We need cross collaboration more than ever.

    • MIT Technology Review | Gideon Lichfield | 3/17/20 | 8 min
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      Jessica3 months ago

      I sense that many of the solutions proposed in this article will be prone to data privacy issues.

    • BuzzFeed News | Tanya Chen | 3/17/20 | 3 min
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      Jessica3 months ago

      The kindest thing to do right now, if one is privileged enough to do so, is to distance yourself from others. Reduce time spent in areas with potentially higher exposure. This is an opportunity for those who are relatively healthy to improve their relationship with technology and really use it to bring us together. And not in the way Zuckerberg always references.

      There is so much uncertainty. When will kids go back to school? How long will someone be unemployed? What about small business owners? Everyone is fighting a different battle, and no battle is greater or less than another. It’s our duty as citizens of the world to make decisions, to the best of our capability, that help our communities. That can mean staying inside for extended periods of time. Call a contact who you think may be hit very hard by the state of affairs. They need to know that other people care now, more than ever.

    • The New York Times Company | THE EDITORIAL BOARD | 3/14/20 | 8 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      Jessica3 months ago
    • London Review of Books | Meehan Crist | 2/23/20 | 50 min
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      Jessica3 months ago

      Wow. Incredible piece.

      I was just a student a few years ago, and I didn’t have to think of wildfires, power shutdowns, and global health crises as barriers to my education. Now these are obstacles for any student to complete their education while learning to grapple with the complexities of coming of age. And to think that fossil fuel companies have deliberately steered propaganda by manipulating us into believing there is greater individual fault in contributing to climate change than their entire industry - despicable. Imagine how many children see those ads and internalize them at a young age. The world we are in now should not be the only reality children believe in for their future. Climate change is not governed by political boundaries. We have to be global citizens, not just citizens of our countries, in order to work towards solutions that incentivize corporations to do something to alter their practices.

      This is not to say that you should have a biological child. I rather think the point is that no one should tell anyone else whether or not they should procreate. One does not have to give birth to believe in the possibility of a human future.

    • BRIGHT Magazine | Courtney Martin | 1/11/16 | 10 min
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      Jessica3 months ago

      They’re solving problems for people, rather than with, replicating many of the mistakes that the world’s largest development agencies make on a much smaller scale.

      This article reminds me of Leila Janah, founder of Samasource. Her motto of giving work, not giving through charity, aligns with many things this article brought up (like the failed play water pumps.. that was so sad to read).

    • The Atlantic | Kaitlyn Tiffany | 3/12/20 | 12 min
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      The Atlantic
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      Jessica3 months ago
    • capwatkins.com | Cap Watkins | 3 min
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      Jessica4 months ago
    • washingtonpost | Carl Goldman | 2/28/20 | 6 min
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      Jessica4 months ago

      I also watch the news. It’s surreal to see everyone panic — news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures — about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the United States, but it won’t help anybody if we all panic.

      He’s much calmer than so many folks I know who have developed deep, deep paranoia about the virus from too much news exposure. Keep doing things that keep the immune system strong - that most definitely includes taking care of mental health and not being wrapped up in paranoia, causing life stagnation!

    • Medium | Merci Victoria Grace | 2/2/19 | 7 min
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      Jessica4 months ago

      It never occurred to me to have someone else do the work so I could do something seemingly more important behind a desk. The fastest way to learn was to experience the workflow I was trying to digitize, so that’s what I did.

    • Washington Examiner | 1/1/01 | 4 min
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      Jessica4 months ago
    • The Atlantic | James Hamblin | 2/24/20 | 16 min
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      Jessica4 months ago
    • fs.blog | 2/10/20 | 4 min
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      Jessica4 months ago

      Farnam street is one of my favorite resources for all things self-development and growth. So glad to see Shane’s writing getting traction on Readup!

    • Distributed.blog | 1/9/20 | 13 min
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      Jessica4 months ago

      I’ve always been fascinated by Jason Fried and his approach to Basecamp. It’s a very trusting, thoughtful, and generous approach. I wonder how these principles could be applied to large corporations, perhaps outside of tech.

    • The Hustle | 1/19/20 | 9 min
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      The Hustle
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      Jessica4 months ago
    • The Atlantic | Noah Y. Kim | 2/3/20 | 8 min
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      Jessica4 months ago
    • Psych Central | Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC | 1/16/20 | 3 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      Slowly raises hand from feeling called out

      I’m working on finding stillness. Instead of saying “I’m busy”, I’m trying to replace that phrase with “I have priorities and obligations to address“ - helps me filter out what really matters and what I perceive as something that matters

    • Greater Good | 6 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      But what we lose, ironically, is exposure to suffering.

      While I don’t ever wish for anyone to undergo traumatic, high-stakes, high-pain experiences, those experiences are really the ones that transcend our lives and teach us lessons that could not have been learned otherwise.

      On a parallel note... when I was a student, I wondered if instructors remembered what it was like to be a student. At work, I wonder if upper management remember what it was like to be junior staff. At what point up the ladder does that empathy and compassion start wearing off?

    • Psych Central | Julie Peters | 1/16/20 | 3 min
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      Jessica5 months ago
    • The Atlantic | Ian Bogost | 1/16/20 | 12 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      Now home is a prison of convenience that we need special help to escape.

      This must relate to the rise in loneliness as well. If so much is at our fingertips, why leave home? Less interacting with others, and before we know it, it’s harder to get out than to stay in.

    • Business Insider | Hillary Hoffower | 1/12/20 | 6 min
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      Jessica5 months ago
    • brainlenses.substack.com | Colin Wright | 9 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      Good read. But also a reminder that each person’s definition of “success” is different - defining success is a good exercise for an individual to ponder.

    • The Correspondent | Rob Wijnberg | 11/7/19 | 18 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      Knowledge is peculiar in that it grows when it’s shared (as does love, as the romantics would likely point out). And luckily, we humans are ridiculously good at sharing.

      Really loved that line. The back and forth in this article (the paradox!) kept throwing me between feelings of despair and hope. If we can get ourselves into this fossil economy, we have the brains to get out of it. Just not alone, but as a collective.

    • The Atlantic | Derek Thompson | 12/23/19 | 10 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      This was fascinating to read. Like some other articles on Readup, one overarching theme here is to slow down, in life, in everything. I know I always feel like there is more to do... I fall right in that trap.

      What does this history tell us about life in the 21st century? Bosses set hours and income, and workers adjust. When husbands controlled their wives’ schedules, they insisted on a clean and tidy home and a ready-made dinner; and their wives typically obliged. When today’s employers hire a full-time worker under modern labor laws, they insist on a 40-hour week, or more; and the worker typically obliges. It doesn’t matter whether technology stays the same, or improves by leaps and bounds.

      I’m super interested to see how this morphs with increasing creations in automation moving forward.

    • fs.blog | 1/6/20 | 7 min
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      Jessica5 months ago
    • Gay Mag | Laura June | 12/11/19 | 12 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      Time away from what you love most always makes you better at loving

      I keep rereading that line.

    • Human Parts | Ryan Holiday | 9/17/19 | 8 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      Reminds me of a study that showed folks who had external, serious hobbies demonstrated better work performance and satisfaction, especially if that hobby/activity is something very different from the main money-making daily grind.

      And of course, this quote: “Jack of all trades, master of none, though oftentimes better than master of one.”

    • Science of Us | David Wallace-Wells | 12/31/19 | 7 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      I am guilty of paying less attention to the Australia fires than I probably would have if this were a few years ago. On the contrary, I pay excessive attention to the California fires.. because I am a California resident and identify as Californian through and through.

      I do feel massive guilt for not giving as much attention as I should. It is difficult to put more energy on such a heartbreaking climate scenario on a different continent when I have (what feels like) limitless situations local to me that I can barely pay my full attention to..

    • nationalgeographic.com | KIRSTEN LUCE, Natasha Daly | 5/15/19 | 27 min
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      Jessica5 months ago

      Lots to think about. The descriptions and images are haunting.

      What about other options for making a living outside of wildlife tourism? Or is wildlife tourism so much more lucrative that other means of business just aren’t even in consideration?