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    Jessica
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    • fs.blog | 2/10/20 | 4 min
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      fs.blog
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      Jessica2 days ago

      Farnam street is one of my favorite resources for all things self-development and growth. So glad to see Shane’s writing getting traction on Readup!

    • Distributed.blog | 1/9/20 | 13 min
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      Distributed.blog
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      Jessica3 days ago

      I’ve always been fascinated by Jason Fried and his approach to Basecamp. It’s a very trusting, thoughtful, and generous approach. I wonder how these principles could be applied to large corporations, perhaps outside of tech.

    • The Hustle | 1/19/20 | 9 min
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      The Hustle
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      Jessica1 week ago
    • The Atlantic | Noah Y. Kim | 2/3/20 | 8 min
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      The Atlantic
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      Jessica2 weeks ago
    • Psych Central | Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC | 1/16/20 | 3 min
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      Psych Central
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      Jessica4 weeks ago

      Slowly raises hand from feeling called out

      I’m working on finding stillness. Instead of saying “I’m busy”, I’m trying to replace that phrase with “I have priorities and obligations to address“ - helps me filter out what really matters and what I perceive as something that matters

    • Greater Good | 6 min
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      Greater Good
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      Jessica4 weeks ago

      But what we lose, ironically, is exposure to suffering.

      While I don’t ever wish for anyone to undergo traumatic, high-stakes, high-pain experiences, those experiences are really the ones that transcend our lives and teach us lessons that could not have been learned otherwise.

      On a parallel note... when I was a student, I wondered if instructors remembered what it was like to be a student. At work, I wonder if upper management remember what it was like to be junior staff. At what point up the ladder does that empathy and compassion start wearing off?

    • Psych Central | Julie Peters | 1/16/20 | 3 min
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      Psych Central
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      Jessica1 month ago
    • The Atlantic | Ian Bogost | 1/16/20 | 12 min
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      The Atlantic
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      Jessica1 month ago

      Now home is a prison of convenience that we need special help to escape.

      This must relate to the rise in loneliness as well. If so much is at our fingertips, why leave home? Less interacting with others, and before we know it, it’s harder to get out than to stay in.

    • Business Insider | Hillary Hoffower | 1/12/20 | 6 min
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      Business Insider
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      Jessica1 month ago
    • brainlenses.substack.com | Colin Wright | 9 min
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      brainlenses.substack.com
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      Jessica1 month ago

      Good read. But also a reminder that each person’s definition of “success” is different - defining success is a good exercise for an individual to ponder.

    • The Correspondent | Rob Wijnberg | 11/7/19 | 18 min
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      The Correspondent
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      Jessica1 month ago

      Knowledge is peculiar in that it grows when it’s shared (as does love, as the romantics would likely point out). And luckily, we humans are ridiculously good at sharing.

      Really loved that line. The back and forth in this article (the paradox!) kept throwing me between feelings of despair and hope. If we can get ourselves into this fossil economy, we have the brains to get out of it. Just not alone, but as a collective.

    • The Atlantic | Derek Thompson | 12/23/19 | 10 min
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      The Atlantic
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      Jessica1 month ago

      This was fascinating to read. Like some other articles on Readup, one overarching theme here is to slow down, in life, in everything. I know I always feel like there is more to do... I fall right in that trap.

      What does this history tell us about life in the 21st century? Bosses set hours and income, and workers adjust. When husbands controlled their wives’ schedules, they insisted on a clean and tidy home and a ready-made dinner; and their wives typically obliged. When today’s employers hire a full-time worker under modern labor laws, they insist on a 40-hour week, or more; and the worker typically obliges. It doesn’t matter whether technology stays the same, or improves by leaps and bounds.

      I’m super interested to see how this morphs with increasing creations in automation moving forward.

    • fs.blog | 1/6/20 | 7 min
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      Jessica1 month ago
    • Gay Mag | Laura June | 12/11/19 | 12 min
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      Gay Mag
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      Jessica1 month ago

      Time away from what you love most always makes you better at loving

      I keep rereading that line.

    • Human Parts | Ryan Holiday | 9/17/19 | 8 min
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      Human Parts
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      Jessica1 month ago

      Reminds me of a study that showed folks who had external, serious hobbies demonstrated better work performance and satisfaction, especially if that hobby/activity is something very different from the main money-making daily grind.

      And of course, this quote: “Jack of all trades, master of none, though oftentimes better than master of one.”

    • Science of Us | David Wallace-Wells | 12/31/19 | 7 min
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      Science of Us
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      Jessica1 month ago

      I am guilty of paying less attention to the Australia fires than I probably would have if this were a few years ago. On the contrary, I pay excessive attention to the California fires.. because I am a California resident and identify as Californian through and through.

      I do feel massive guilt for not giving as much attention as I should. It is difficult to put more energy on such a heartbreaking climate scenario on a different continent when I have (what feels like) limitless situations local to me that I can barely pay my full attention to..

    • nationalgeographic.com | Natasha Daly, Kirsten Luce | 5/15/19 | 27 min
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      Jessica1 month ago

      Lots to think about. The descriptions and images are haunting.

      What about other options for making a living outside of wildlife tourism? Or is wildlife tourism so much more lucrative that other means of business just aren’t even in consideration?

    • Aeon | Sahanika Ratnayake | 7/25/19 | 14 min
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      Aeon
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      Jessica1 month ago

      This pairs really well with the New Atlantis article that was AOTD recently. Highly recommended!

      Without some ownership of one’s feelings and thoughts, it is difficult to take responsibility for them.

      When I started meditating, I developed a system where I would write down how I felt after meditating, what thoughts stood out to me during meditation, and think about why those usually unsettling thoughts joined in. I can understand how mindfulness creates a barrier between thoughts and self as in the author’s case, but for me, the practice of separating thoughts and self simply served as a tool for developing greater self-awareness. For instance, I may not be my sadness, but I know that sadness permeated me strongly, and I investigate my habits and tendencies that trigger tough emotions. It’s that next step after the self-awareness that really feels transcending.

      Agree with many comments and the conclusion of this piece that mindfulness is not a one size fits all. I do find it is a practice that facilitates life quality and freedom for me in this crazy world of fast flowing information and addictive devices, but only after I worked on developing a mindfulness process that works for my personality and lifestyle.

    • thenewatlantis.com | 29 min
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      thenewatlantis.com
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      Jessica1 month ago
    • The Financial Diet | 12/30/15 | 5 min
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      The Financial Diet
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      Jessica1 month ago

      I always found NYE activities to be very counterproductive to New Year’s resolutions. Now that I’m a lot more conscious about my finances, flamboyant NYE celebrations are even more unnecessary for me. Anyway, I’m sleeping at the usual time tonight and wake up at my normal hour for 2020. Happy new year to y’all!

    • Forge | Leigh Stein | 11/25/19 | 4 min
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      Forge
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      Jessica1 month ago

      This is such a brilliant and easy-to-do exercise. Learning about Steinbeck’s writing circumstance was also illuminating and inspiring.

    • BBC News | Brigid Schulte | 7 min
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      BBC News
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      Jessica1 month ago
    • Bon Appétit | T. Wise | 4/8/19 | 5 min
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      Bon Appétit
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      Jessica2 months ago

      Going sober is an attempt to eliminate the problem without fixing it: It doesn’t make me a stronger or more balanced person. It doesn’t give me more control over my behavior.

      Soooo true about any kind of addiction.

    • Jessica2 months ago

      Interpersonal conflicts can harm a whole field by reducing trust and solidarity, which impedes coordination and makes recruitment much more difficult. Nobody wants to join a field where everybody is fighting with each other.

      True for almost every aspect of social connection.

      Although I find the article content important, my already over-analytical mind is probably going to become prone to even more overthinking now. Heavy sigh

    • Benjamin P. Hardy | 10/20/19 | 4 min
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      Benjamin P. Hardy
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      Jessica2 months ago

      Recently heard a spinoff quote: “You are the average of the five IDEAS you spend the most time with.” Same spirit as the original quote, ideas are also influenced by people.

    • BBC News | David Robson | 10 min
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      BBC News
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      Jessica2 months ago

      I was giggling at the various definitions of ‘polymath’.. our inclination to specify meanings to words as humans can be so bizarre.

    • risk-engineering.org | Eric Marsden | 13 min
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      Jessica2 months ago
    • Raptitude.com | 11/26/19 | 4 min
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      Raptitude.com
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      Jessica2 months ago

      Reminds me of a study that showed how people who are happier have minds that wander less.. they focus fully on the task at hand.

      I used to blast music or podcasts while doing things like cooking or exercising. I recently transitioned to using no headphones while going on a run, and the runs are 100x better.

    • fs.blog | 11/12/19 | 20 min
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      fs.blog
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      Jessica3 months ago

      “It is amazing how complete is the delusion that beauty is goodness.” ― Leo Tolstoy, The Kreutzer Sonata

      ^ an honest, layered statement about perception/deception

    • The New York Times Company | David Brooks | 4/11/15 | 12 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      Jessica3 months ago

      I really enjoyed reading this. It pulled me out of the murky hole that I sometimes unknowingly dig myself in, especially from working as an employee of a large corporation where a “go getter” mentality is the norm.

      “They see life as a moral drama and feel fulfilled only when they are enmeshed in a struggle on behalf of some ideal.” Whenever difficult situations arise, I’m just going to call them “moral dramas.” That phrase reframes the situation/puts it in an all new light.

    • Quartz | Leah Fessler | 5/24/18 | 6 min
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      Jessica3 months ago

      I feel that emotional labor happens all the time in my personal life.

      Especially when the other party talks too much/is fragile to most things in their life.. listening to someone else continuously talking, especially with me just nodding my head every time/not being able to speak, is like helping them manage their emotions.

      That is tremendously tiring.

    • The Atlantic | Judith Shulevitz | 10/10/19 | 12 min
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      The Atlantic
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      Jessica3 months ago
    • washingtonpost | Tony Romm, Isaac Stanley-Becker | 10/30/19 | 5 min
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      Jessica3 months ago
    • latimes.com | Liam Dillon | 10/28/19 | 4 min
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      latimes.com
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      Jessica3 months ago

      We have a lot to work on. California being on fire with new records on number of evacuations and planned power shutdowns should never feel like a norm. I refuse to let it become a norm.

    • The New York Times Company | Alex W. Palmer | 10/16/19 | 67 min
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      The New York Times Company
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      Jessica3 months ago

      Wow. Where to begin? Buemi's persistence in tracking down the source(s) stuck with me the entire time. Being a double agent for years and posing as a genuine buyer requires a lot from a person.

    • The New Yorker | Dana Goodyear | 8/11/19 | 5 min
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      The New Yorker
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      Jessica3 months ago

      The part about the colors that mish and mash with social media "enhancement" (I am currently not able think of a better word to describe that urge to make instagram feeds look prettier/faker) made me shake my head. Agh. The food industry has enough to deal with; let's not let the trap of platforms like instagram and "influencers" make that industry even more difficult.

    • The New Yorker | Howard Fishman | 10/23/19 | 9 min
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      The New Yorker
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      Jessica3 months ago

      Felt busted for a moment. I had a knee-jerk reaction to the title and panicked for a split second, thinking, (1) I need to spend even more money now to do things I enjoy, like browse a bookstore??, (2) oh no, that is so selfish of me, and (3) is the bookstore market getting worse? and worse? am I part of the problem? [because I certainly do browse amazon for prices and see how much more/less I would potentially spend.]

      I am a blank slate on bookstore business models. All I know is the grey-zone of bookstore decline with online retailers (like amazon). While the idea of paying to enter a bookstore makes me feel squeamish, especially since I habitually visit local bookstores to browse new titles, I see the concern for extra payments as a way to keep these stores thriving. A donation box came to mind.. or a fee for store events/meet-ups.

      I also have been going more to my local libraries, many of which have small used-book sales of their own that support community events for my library. In many ways, I find libraries more resourceful and accessible to the community than bookstores (which often serve folks of privileged demographics and financial base). I'm lucky to have the option to shop at bookstores.. and I love that they provide the latest and greatest in the publishing world.

      This part also stuck out to me: "Never mind that I probably own more unread books than I could ever possibly read in a lifetime. Somehow, deep down, I think I believe that I will live long enough to read them and everything else, eventually. Books make me feel immortal, and I want more of them, always." I will probably always have more books on my to-read list than I will be able to finish. Right now, I'm in this process of coming to terms with starting more books than I actually finish; and, very importantly, not feeling guilty for being unable to finish a book at that moment if I am really unable to bring myself to learn the subject matter or connect with the story being told.

    • Vice | Joseph Cox | 8/14/13 | 10 min
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      Vice
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      Jessica3 months ago

      As I read Pollan’s book on psychedelics (which is blowing my mind; is that not uncanny??), I’m meeting fascinating folks like Feilding.

      Feilding: The only person I know of who would drill a hole in their head and also make it an art-piece while testing a scientific hypothesis on blood flow with implications for psychological states and mental illness.

    • nationalgeographic.com | Simon Worrall | 1/4/15 | 11 min
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      nationalgeographic.com
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      Jessica3 months ago

      Whoa.

      I went into this without much of an opinion on Homer’s work.. funnily enough, what I remember best was the scene with the Sirens. That stuck with me forever.

      And that last line. Love is always a possibility.

    • fs.blog | 10/14/19 | 6 min
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      Jessica3 months ago

      I’ve been following farnam street lately and I am loving their content. I also recommend the Knowledge Project podcast. Shane Parrish is a great interviewer.

      So so many thoughts on this.

      I used to feel super guilty and pressure myself to “work better” when I’m not in focused mode. Somehow, I thought that if I were not constantly in focused mode, my work was of lower quality. [I used to be SO guilty of taking social media “breaks” because I’d attempt to be in focused mode for too long.] There would be days when I’d get upset about interruptions. Some days I still fall into this trap.

      And this is so true about reading, and relevant to the incredible articles on readup:

      << Think of how your mind works when you read. As you read a particular sentence of a book, you can’t simultaneously step back to ponder the entire work. Only when you put the book down can you develop a comprehensive picture, drawing connections between concepts and making sense of it all. >>