1. Join Readup to read with Jessica.

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    • Vanity Fair | Jesse Hyde | 3/24/20 | 21 min
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      1 week ago

      Land. It is what supports our homes, our communities. It is where we cultivate our food, build our cities. It is what we take for granted.

      This story is taking time to process.

    • CityLab | Richard Florida | 3/27/20 | 6 min
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      1 week ago
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      2 weeks ago

      This is fascinating. As is with most things, if vanadium is shown to be the most efficient and forward path to sustainable energy, the politicization and greed that may accompany such a precious resource may also be its downfall. How do we protect and best use our resources?

      Loved this analogy -

      Vanadium batteries can be a reservoir of energy much in the same way as we use actual reservoirs to store rainwater for later use

    • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences | 22 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Dense. This is an academic paper. I’ve been thinking a lot about environmental history and what we can learn from our resilience to past disasters. What does research tell us?

      “..disasters forcefully unearth our differences and divisions, revealing, reproducing, and even exacerbating social and economic inequalities.” - Paul S. Sutter

      Public health, conservation, agricultural security, and economic development are deeply intertwined in ways that are not immediately obvious.

      We need cross collaboration more than ever.

    • MIT Technology Review | Gideon Lichfield | 3/17/20 | 8 min
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      2 weeks ago

      I sense that many of the solutions proposed in this article will be prone to data privacy issues.

    • BuzzFeed News | Tanya Chen | 3/17/20 | 3 min
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      2 weeks ago

      The kindest thing to do right now, if one is privileged enough to do so, is to distance yourself from others. Reduce time spent in areas with potentially higher exposure. This is an opportunity for those who are relatively healthy to improve their relationship with technology and really use it to bring us together. And not in the way Zuckerberg always references.

      There is so much uncertainty. When will kids go back to school? How long will someone be unemployed? What about small business owners? Everyone is fighting a different battle, and no battle is greater or less than another. It’s our duty as citizens of the world to make decisions, to the best of our capability, that help our communities. That can mean staying inside for extended periods of time. Call a contact who you think may be hit very hard by the state of affairs. They need to know that other people care now, more than ever.

    • The New York Times Company | THE EDITORIAL BOARD | 3/14/20 | 8 min
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      3 weeks ago
    • London Review of Books | Meehan Crist | 2/23/20 | 50 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Wow. Incredible piece.

      I was just a student a few years ago, and I didn’t have to think of wildfires, power shutdowns, and global health crises as barriers to my education. Now these are obstacles for any student to complete their education while learning to grapple with the complexities of coming of age. And to think that fossil fuel companies have deliberately steered propaganda by manipulating us into believing there is greater individual fault in contributing to climate change than their entire industry - despicable. Imagine how many children see those ads and internalize them at a young age. The world we are in now should not be the only reality children believe in for their future. Climate change is not governed by political boundaries. We have to be global citizens, not just citizens of our countries, in order to work towards solutions that incentivize corporations to do something to alter their practices.

      This is not to say that you should have a biological child. I rather think the point is that no one should tell anyone else whether or not they should procreate. One does not have to give birth to believe in the possibility of a human future.

    • BRIGHT Magazine | Courtney Martin | 1/11/16 | 10 min
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      3 weeks ago

      They’re solving problems for people, rather than with, replicating many of the mistakes that the world’s largest development agencies make on a much smaller scale.

      This article reminds me of Leila Janah, founder of Samasource. Her motto of giving work, not giving through charity, aligns with many things this article brought up (like the failed play water pumps.. that was so sad to read).

    • The Atlantic | Kaitlyn Tiffany | 3/12/20 | 12 min
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      3 weeks ago
    • capwatkins.com | Cap Watkins | 3 min
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      1 month ago
    • washingtonpost | Carl Goldman | 2/28/20 | 6 min
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      1 month ago

      I also watch the news. It’s surreal to see everyone panic — news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures — about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the United States, but it won’t help anybody if we all panic.

      He’s much calmer than so many folks I know who have developed deep, deep paranoia about the virus from too much news exposure. Keep doing things that keep the immune system strong - that most definitely includes taking care of mental health and not being wrapped up in paranoia, causing life stagnation!

    • Organizer Sandbox | Merci Victoria Grace | 2/2/19 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      It never occurred to me to have someone else do the work so I could do something seemingly more important behind a desk. The fastest way to learn was to experience the workflow I was trying to digitize, so that’s what I did.

    • Washington Examiner | 1/1/01 | 4 min
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      1 month ago
    • The Atlantic | James Hamblin | 2/24/20 | 16 min
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      1 month ago
    • fs.blog | 2/10/20 | 4 min
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      1 month ago

      Farnam street is one of my favorite resources for all things self-development and growth. So glad to see Shane’s writing getting traction on Readup!

    • Distributed.blog | 1/9/20 | 13 min
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      1 month ago

      I’ve always been fascinated by Jason Fried and his approach to Basecamp. It’s a very trusting, thoughtful, and generous approach. I wonder how these principles could be applied to large corporations, perhaps outside of tech.

    • The Hustle | 1/19/20 | 9 min
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      1 month ago
    • The Atlantic | Noah Y. Kim | 2/3/20 | 8 min
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      2 months ago
    • Psych Central | Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC | 1/16/20 | 3 min
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      2 months ago

      Slowly raises hand from feeling called out

      I’m working on finding stillness. Instead of saying “I’m busy”, I’m trying to replace that phrase with “I have priorities and obligations to address“ - helps me filter out what really matters and what I perceive as something that matters

    • Greater Good | 6 min
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      2 months ago

      But what we lose, ironically, is exposure to suffering.

      While I don’t ever wish for anyone to undergo traumatic, high-stakes, high-pain experiences, those experiences are really the ones that transcend our lives and teach us lessons that could not have been learned otherwise.

      On a parallel note... when I was a student, I wondered if instructors remembered what it was like to be a student. At work, I wonder if upper management remember what it was like to be junior staff. At what point up the ladder does that empathy and compassion start wearing off?

    • Psych Central | Julie Peters | 1/16/20 | 3 min
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      2 months ago
    • The Atlantic | Ian Bogost | 1/16/20 | 12 min
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      2 months ago

      Now home is a prison of convenience that we need special help to escape.

      This must relate to the rise in loneliness as well. If so much is at our fingertips, why leave home? Less interacting with others, and before we know it, it’s harder to get out than to stay in.

    • Business Insider | Hillary Hoffower | 1/12/20 | 6 min
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      2 months ago
    • brainlenses.substack.com | Colin Wright | 9 min
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      2 months ago

      Good read. But also a reminder that each person’s definition of “success” is different - defining success is a good exercise for an individual to ponder.

    • The Correspondent | Rob Wijnberg | 11/7/19 | 18 min
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      2 months ago

      Knowledge is peculiar in that it grows when it’s shared (as does love, as the romantics would likely point out). And luckily, we humans are ridiculously good at sharing.

      Really loved that line. The back and forth in this article (the paradox!) kept throwing me between feelings of despair and hope. If we can get ourselves into this fossil economy, we have the brains to get out of it. Just not alone, but as a collective.

    • The Atlantic | Derek Thompson | 12/23/19 | 10 min
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      2 months ago

      This was fascinating to read. Like some other articles on Readup, one overarching theme here is to slow down, in life, in everything. I know I always feel like there is more to do... I fall right in that trap.

      What does this history tell us about life in the 21st century? Bosses set hours and income, and workers adjust. When husbands controlled their wives’ schedules, they insisted on a clean and tidy home and a ready-made dinner; and their wives typically obliged. When today’s employers hire a full-time worker under modern labor laws, they insist on a 40-hour week, or more; and the worker typically obliges. It doesn’t matter whether technology stays the same, or improves by leaps and bounds.

      I’m super interested to see how this morphs with increasing creations in automation moving forward.

    • fs.blog | 1/6/20 | 7 min
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      2 months ago
    • Gay Mag | Laura June | 12/11/19 | 12 min
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      2 months ago

      Time away from what you love most always makes you better at loving

      I keep rereading that line.

    • Human Parts | Ryan Holiday | 9/17/19 | 8 min
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      2 months ago

      Reminds me of a study that showed folks who had external, serious hobbies demonstrated better work performance and satisfaction, especially if that hobby/activity is something very different from the main money-making daily grind.

      And of course, this quote: “Jack of all trades, master of none, though oftentimes better than master of one.”

    • Science of Us | David Wallace-Wells | 12/31/19 | 7 min
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      2 months ago

      I am guilty of paying less attention to the Australia fires than I probably would have if this were a few years ago. On the contrary, I pay excessive attention to the California fires.. because I am a California resident and identify as Californian through and through.

      I do feel massive guilt for not giving as much attention as I should. It is difficult to put more energy on such a heartbreaking climate scenario on a different continent when I have (what feels like) limitless situations local to me that I can barely pay my full attention to..

    • nationalgeographic.com | KIRSTEN LUCE, Natasha Daly | 5/15/19 | 27 min
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      3 months ago

      Lots to think about. The descriptions and images are haunting.

      What about other options for making a living outside of wildlife tourism? Or is wildlife tourism so much more lucrative that other means of business just aren’t even in consideration?

    • Aeon | Sahanika Ratnayake | 7/25/19 | 14 min
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      3 months ago

      This pairs really well with the New Atlantis article that was AOTD recently. Highly recommended!

      Without some ownership of one’s feelings and thoughts, it is difficult to take responsibility for them.

      When I started meditating, I developed a system where I would write down how I felt after meditating, what thoughts stood out to me during meditation, and think about why those usually unsettling thoughts joined in. I can understand how mindfulness creates a barrier between thoughts and self as in the author’s case, but for me, the practice of separating thoughts and self simply served as a tool for developing greater self-awareness. For instance, I may not be my sadness, but I know that sadness permeated me strongly, and I investigate my habits and tendencies that trigger tough emotions. It’s that next step after the self-awareness that really feels transcending.

      Agree with many comments and the conclusion of this piece that mindfulness is not a one size fits all. I do find it is a practice that facilitates life quality and freedom for me in this crazy world of fast flowing information and addictive devices, but only after I worked on developing a mindfulness process that works for my personality and lifestyle.

    • thenewatlantis.com | 29 min
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      3 months ago
    • The Financial Diet | 12/30/15 | 5 min
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      3 months ago

      I always found NYE activities to be very counterproductive to New Year’s resolutions. Now that I’m a lot more conscious about my finances, flamboyant NYE celebrations are even more unnecessary for me. Anyway, I’m sleeping at the usual time tonight and wake up at my normal hour for 2020. Happy new year to y’all!

    • Forge | Leigh Stein | 11/25/19 | 4 min
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      3 months ago

      This is such a brilliant and easy-to-do exercise. Learning about Steinbeck’s writing circumstance was also illuminating and inspiring.

    • BBC News | Brigid Schulte | 7 min
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      3 months ago
    • Bon Appétit | T. Wise | 4/8/19 | 5 min
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      3 months ago

      Going sober is an attempt to eliminate the problem without fixing it: It doesn’t make me a stronger or more balanced person. It doesn’t give me more control over my behavior.

      Soooo true about any kind of addiction.

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      3 months ago

      Interpersonal conflicts can harm a whole field by reducing trust and solidarity, which impedes coordination and makes recruitment much more difficult. Nobody wants to join a field where everybody is fighting with each other.

      True for almost every aspect of social connection.

      Although I find the article content important, my already over-analytical mind is probably going to become prone to even more overthinking now. Heavy sigh

    • Benjamin P. Hardy | 10/20/19 | 4 min
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      4 months ago

      Recently heard a spinoff quote: “You are the average of the five IDEAS you spend the most time with.” Same spirit as the original quote, ideas are also influenced by people.