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    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      3 months ago

      Very Interesting, painful and rather sad topic to read about. Much like the recent Poppers read this one is another example of why RU is fantastic! Doubtful I will read about this elsewhere in my own time and I am grateful to get perspective on this.

      The quote from the plastic surgeon about what their role should be and that they should not just cater to the client every whim is rather grounded; although when there is a statement of the role being to help people look “normal” that makes my skin crawl all the same a bit.

      Side note: Brazil and Sao Paolo are surfacing a lot here lately. I look forward to visiting. Omg, and the history of why the surgery was created there in the first place to try to erase Black and Indigenous physical traits is ICK!

    • sjwoo3 months ago

      Aftercare guidance depends on the patient’s existing body type, but all of them must wear a faja, a corset-like garment that keeps the body shape in place, for about three months as the new fat learns to connect with the existing fat. Sleeping must be done face-down for at least six weeks, and sitting requires a special pillow. To help with circulation, patients must schedule regular post-op massages, which are often painful. Peeing, by the way, is its own hurdle. “I’ve seen people where they’ll keep [the garment] on while they go to the bathroom, they’ll literally just pee all over themselves and live like that,” Helly says.

      High heels, pancake makeup, corsets, plastic surgery -- it never ceases to amaze me the lengths some women go to achieve the unachievable. (I'm sure there are plenty of men getting plastic surgery, too...and I feel sad for them, too.)

    • Pegeen
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      3 months ago

      Humans have a very long history of feeling inadequate and ashamed of their bodies. It seems an endemic aspect of our growing up. Perhaps it’s part of our innate expansion process to rise above our cultural conditioning and standards to embrace ourselves fully as we are. To celebrate more than our outward shapes and features. I have struggled in my own lifetime with such issues and I can only attest to it’s rewards when making inroads into seeing myself as beautiful because I’m human - with all these complicated feelings and struggles. I have hope for the younger generations because enough of them will eventually see how destructive and futile it is to chase youth and an ideal according to someone else. It will only be another “system” to be dismantled.

    • Alexa3 months ago

      WILD. I love this writer already, I am on their paid substack but hot dang. This is more in my trend of bringing up insane internet induced body-dysmorphia trend articles. Thanks beauty culture! screams forever

      The BBL, just like any of the fastest-growing cosmetic surgery procedures, attempts to recreate the way we look when our bodies are filtered through the internet.

      The fatality rate is wild, I can't wrap my mind around opting in to this, esp laying down to go into surgery and not knowing the risk. WTF. I thought lip injections were cray, this is madness. Give me a dumptruck ass or give me death, literally.