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    Vanity Fair | Gore Vidal | 1/3/05 | 21 min
    10 reads5 comments
    9.8
    Vanity Fair
    10 reads
    9.8
    You must read the article before you can post or reply.
    • Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      1 month ago

      For me, this is a complex and fascinating portrait of an American hero that’s certainly plausible, if indeed Lincoln’s early puberty had him curious and more open to his attraction to both sexes. It creates a conflict that must have been so difficult to navigate considering the stifling and moralistic time period. And, quite frankly, on the whole, we still have a long way to go as far as embracing all forms of sexuality.

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
        1 month ago

        “And, quite frankly, on the whole, we still have a long way to go as far as embracing all forms of sexuality.”

        So True!

    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 month ago

      That answers that!

      From ‘05. Legit historic. Very glad I read this. Everyone should.

      1. Update (3/12/2021):

        im still thinking about Lincoln's thighs lol

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
        1 month ago

        This is such a stellar read. I know I am not alone in immense gratitude for so much Gold you import here after quiet hiatus’.

    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      1 month ago

      A terrific read!

      “One great public mistake of his character as generally received and acquiesced in—he is considered by the people of this country as a frank, guileless, unsophisticated man. There never was a greater mistake. Beneath a smooth surface of candor and an apparent declaration of all his thoughts and feelings, he exercised the most exalted tact and the wisest discrimination. He handled and moved man remotely as we do pieces upon a chessboard. He retained through life, all the friends he ever had, and he made the wrath of his enemies to praise him. This was not by cunning, or intrigue in the low acceptation of the term, but by far seeing, reason and discernment. He always told enough only, of his plans and purposes, to induce the belief that he had communicated all; yet he reserved enough, in fact, to have communicated nothing. He told all that was unimportant with a gushing frankness; yet no man ever kept his real purposes more closely, or penetrated the future further with his deep designs.”

      This Beautifully Describes a Really Incredible Person I have the greatest luck and most appreciative honor of knowing in this current Real Life as well.

      I am learning how to incorporate many of these admirable traits in my own life.