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    • kellyalysia
      Scout
      3 weeks ago

      Wow this was magnificent. I will have to come back to it again and again, I think. It got me thinking a lot with this line:

      The bias against going down arises from our cultural conditioning. Christian mythology teaches that resurrection and ascension are the proper directions for a spiritual life. The very earth is seen as a fallen place, and our bodies are perceived as fallen objects that can be redeemed only by the soul finally getting out of this tawdry place and moving on to its final reward. You rise above, getting better, higher, and lighter. But low-lying places of regression, of descent, of lamentation are not less sacred.

      Lately I have been thinking that one cause of violence and divisiveness in our culture is that we lack a common myth — a myth that we hold in common. The common myth that is often subscribed to is one tied closely to capitalism which this article touches on of, "rugged individualism." The common myth in the west is that if you work hard, you will be rewarded.

      I do think that the common myth is one you find in many peaceful and long-living pockets of people, but we have not found a way to write and adhere to a common myth that spans religions and actually brings people together. I often wonder what that would look like, but I definitely know that an effective one is one that would allow for the type of grief and healing that is discussed in this piece.

      • SEnkey
        Scout
        1 week ago

        Agreed. I will come back again and again.

    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Every single ReadUp Reader should Read This One. Essential. Deserves to be among the Top Ten Best Ever Reads.

      There Is So Much Gold Here and Depth and Important Wisdom and Insight.

      Every time I would think I found an excerpt to Highlight over the 50 minutes...one right after the other...no way to choose.

      This whole Read is 10. A+++++

      Interestingly, I feel the Marvel Series WandaVision successfully tapped into a lot of this...though in as much depth as a Marvel Story can take it.

      ”But what is Grief if not Love Persevering?”

      ”You are my sadness and my hope; but mostly, You Are My Love.”

      Francis goes Ultra-Deep into indigenous realms and more.

      Here are a few excepts from the read that blew me away (you Need to read it though for the reams and reams of Glorious Depth:

      There are few human expressions more genuine than a cry of grief. We don’t have to wonder what that person is experiencing. It is the soul revealing itself: Right now I am just broken by this loss. It’s also powerful because we almost never hear it in this country. Many cultures, but not ours, have keeners whose job it is to sound the note that opens the gate, so that we can all enter sorrow together.

      We are meant to have a more sensuous, imaginative, and creative existence.

      1. Update (5/27/2021):

        The second part of ancestral grief for white people in the U.S. has to do with what many of our European ancestors did when they got here. They decimated an indigenous population through war and disease. They brought slavery to this continent. We have not reconciled with the indigenous people of this country or the people we brought here from Africa. That grief is still there in our collective psyche. We’ve barely touched it. Some other countries with similar histories are beginning to deal with such griefs. The Canadian government recently apologized to its indigenous people, though now it’s backtracking. Australia has done some symbolic work with the aboriginal people. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa was significant. But the ancestral grief is thick in the U.S.

      • Jessica
        Top reader this weekScoutScribe
        3 weeks ago

        Love these excerpts you chose, Dellwood.

        • Pegeen
          ScoutScribe
          3 weeks ago

          I agree, fabulous quotes!

    • Pegeen
      ScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      Stellar interview about grief but really about living more fully and authentically. Here are just 2 samples of the wisdom within. “The work of the mature person is to carry grief in one hand and gratitude in the other and to be stretched large by them.” “The greater part of my soul lives outside the body. My soul is entwined with those Douglas firs, and the redwood and the sorrel and the raccoon and the fox.” Grief opens us, frees us to be more joyful, present and compassionate responders to life.

      • Jessica
        Top reader this weekScoutScribe
        3 weeks ago

        Really love the quote on grief and gratitude in each hand. So many great quotes to jot down from this interview!

        • Pegeen
          ScoutScribe
          3 weeks ago

          I felt the same way Jessica. So glad you liked it. It deserves AOTD!

          • DellwoodBarker
            Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
            3 weeks ago

            P.s. I am Really Looking Forward to the Wonder Woman Read, a little later! You’re on Fire, Scouting Goddess!

            • Pegeen
              ScoutScribe
              3 weeks ago

              Can’t wait for your reply. I have not followed comics despite having a famous comic artist friend and ex brother in law who has dealt in comic books as a business his entire life. I don’t think he ever had a “normal” job. He happens to be best friends with the other person I mentioned. My daughter and son in law seem to love comics, so I’m interested if they know this history. I loved the article - fascinating! When you consider the time period in question, it’s radical.

          • DellwoodBarker
            Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
            3 weeks ago

            Yes it does and Now Is. Deserves to land in Best Ever Reads as well.

            • Pegeen
              ScoutScribe
              3 weeks ago

              Thanks Dellwood! I’m thrilled you and Jessica both loved it. I was insane for it. I really could have highlighted the entire interview!

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
        3 weeks ago

        This is Some of the Best of the Best Reading I’ve experienced since joining RU. Need to mark this as Gold and Classic to revisit again and again.

    • Jessica
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Loved this interview. I couldn’t put it down once I started reading it.

      There are so many themes surrounding community and wellness, how emotions manifest in the body, and how trauma is carried over from generation to generation. Especially this past year, these have all shown up in everyone’s life in different ways.

      Life is asking us to meet it on its terms, not ours. We try to control every minute detail, but life is too rambunctious, too wild. We simply can’t avoid the losses, wounds, and failures that come into our lives. What we can do is bring compassion to what arrives at our door and meet it with kindness and affection. We can become a good host.

      Everything I love, I will lose. That’s the harsh truth. You either have to shut down your heart — and miss the love that is around you — or wrestle with that truth and come out the other end. There is indeed such a thing as joyful sorrow.