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    The New Yorker | Haruki Murakami | 8/29/11 | 41 min
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    The New Yorker
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    • deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      2 weeks ago

      “When a vacuum forms, something has to come along to fill it. That’s what everybody does.”

      A vacuum is an opportunity to search for something deep within yourself and find the source of emptiness. Maybe you will find nothing there and don't know how long you need to stay with it. By endeavor or serendipitously, what if you find something, that would be better to fill the vacuum and continue living life without worrying about the vacuum.

      • bill
        Top reader this weekTop reader of all timeScoutScribe
        1 week ago
        1. The vacuum episode is spectacular. Great find!

        I also loved the story within the story about the cats. Extraordinarily vivid.

        • Karenz1 week ago

          I loved this story. It has so much mystery which is symbolized by the town of cats. Very quirky and deeply human at the same time. It may’ve been The I Ching that postulated a hole thru which humans and gods could commune with each other. The hole is actually psychological, that emptiness or vacuum in each of us that nothing seems to fill but where it’s possible to meet the gods. Problem is the hole can feel unbearable so we’re always trying to fill it and we block out the gods. Against all odds, this father and son seem to have met in this hole.

    • bill
      Top reader this weekTop reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Murakami FTW. This is enchanting and dark.