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    The New Yorker | Ben Purkert | 5/13/13 | 1 min
    8 reads3 comments
    7.3
    The New Yorker
    8 reads
    7.3
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    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      One of my favorite poems of all time.

      • Pegeen
        Reading streakScout
        1 week ago

        I would be interested in why. I keep reading it over and over. And I know I will return to it many times. I will even Google the author to hopefully find a clue. Some are haunted by ghosts. Me - words.

        • bill
          Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
          1 week ago

          Ha! That's a hard question to answer!

          The title is titanium-strong; I love when short, simple words are allowed to be as huge as they really are. Plus, I'm obsessed with time (being in the moment, aka "today") and purpose or meaning (aka "work.")

          I like the size and shape. It's a light/easy poem that asks to be read again and again. It also just sounds nice. Just as the writer is "concealed" from the "viewer," the reader is concealed from both. So we're all "searching for" that verb - or, the answer to the relationship in the poem. None of it is remotely clear, but I enjoy filling in the blanks.

          "Exploding like a bridge" is one of my favorite phrases ever. How the heck does a bridge explode anyway? I love imagining it. And I love imagining a person exploding that way. Wow.