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    The New Yorker | Jane Mayer | 7/22/19 | 67 min
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    The New Yorker
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    • Jim8 months ago

      Great article..... A difficult topic to discuss, but really should be hashed out especially by true "Me Too'ers" ..... He got a raw deal..... There should have been a better process for him to address these charges, the rush to judgement seemed calculated, especially by Kristen Gillibrand, I met her and actually had a conversation with her, I came away unimpressed. Gillibrand did not seem genuine. According to the article, this was a political takedown by a right-wing group. The democrats were played, and lost a true soldier for the progressives. I hope he can recover and get back into politics.

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        8 months ago

        What's difficult to discuss? The article lays it all out very clearly. Jane Mayer is great. Her work with Ronan Farrow is some of the best investigative journalism of the decade.

        What's a "true "Me Too'er"? Do you just mean people who support the #MeToo movement? If so, that's definitely me. And almost everyone I know. Although I have met a lot of people who think it's bullshit (especially in middle America). What's your stance?

        Kristen Gillibrand screwed up. No doubt. So did dozens of others. The article makes Chuck Schumer look like the biggest nightmare of all. He's a mob boss. I've been saying forever that the two-party system is the source of widespread, overly-simplistic thinking. Everything is a binary these days.

        Franken shouldn't have resigned. It's his own fault. He screwed up a great learning opportunity for everyone, because he couldn't handle a basic task: help the public to understand a complex/complicated situation. Indeed, it's tough. Especially since most of the public gets their news from cable TV and social media. But if a politicians isn't up to the task, get out of the way.

        The coolest move would have been if Franken was like, "These people are insane. I'm an independent now. I believe in thinking versus mob mentality."

        • Jim8 months ago

          Please do not label me as a "me-too" critic, I am not that, far from it.... There is , in my opinion a 'rush to judgement mentality' that, at times seems to have taken over.

          • bill
            Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
            8 months ago

            Uhh. Criticism is perfectly healthy, but if you're going to keep doing it, you need to just call yourself a critic. Otherwise we're in la la land.

            Congress rushed to judgement. No doubt about that. What I'm saying is this: let's keep #metoo - the term and the movement - a safe distance from those idiots.

            In your initial comment you said that this "really should be hashed out especially by true "Me Too'ers". I'm saying that that's bullshit. Women who pipe up about being sexually assaulted don't owe anybody a damn thing, least of all an explanation for why the mob of clowns in Congress are attacking each other.

            I love this quote by Rebecca Solnit:

            For detractors of the #MeToo movement the “going too far” argument tends to focus on misfires, cases when men who have committed comparatively minor offenses or done something that’s not confirmed or clarified get swept up in the torrent, or when due process seems to be missing. It would be helpful if people would remember that feminism and women as a class aren’t actually making those decisions; management is, and management in these cases is often a panicky version of the powerful people, often male, who turned a blind eye to the problem when they weren’t being held accountable by the seepage of these stories into the public realm.

            Anyway, Jim, if I'm splitting hairs here it's because I don't give a damn that Franken resigned too soon and/or Aziz got embarrassed. It's not that big of a deal compared to the fact that an absurdly high percentage of the women I'm close to have been sexually assaulted. Let's worry about that.

            • Jim8 months ago

              ok.

              • bill
                Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
                8 months ago

                ok what? the article took me almost an hour and a half to read, lol, i want some kind of closure! Schumer's still in hiding. Can anybody read this article and be okay with that?

    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      8 months ago

      I still can't get over this:

      Schumer declined to be interviewed, but sent a statement: “Al Franken’s decision to step down was the right decision—for the good of the Senate and the good of the country. I regret losing him as a colleague but given the circumstances, it was inevitable.”

      What a pile of crap. I guess he's saying that it's "inevitable" that politicians have to go along with whatever fake news is on social media instead of standing up for truth and due process, even if it's tough. That statement amounts to a real slap in the face to progressives everywhere.