1. Did you even read the article?

    Readup tracks your reading progress. In our community, you can’t comment on articles you haven’t really read.

    The New Yorker | Rivka Galchen | 3/2/20 | 28 min
    6 reads10 comments
    10
    The New Yorker
    6 reads
    10
    PadlockYou must read the article before you can post or reply.
    • Alexa
      ScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      This is lovely, a meandering look at South Korea's composting success and how that could apply to New York.

      I'm aching for industrial composting where I live, and these articles give me hope its doable and wont take forever.

      “Today, South Korea recycles ninety-five per cent of its food waste, but twenty-five years ago almost nothing was recycled. “

      • jeff
        ScoutScribe
        3 weeks ago

        I've been searching for an article like this! Ever since I saw this fascinating video on recycling in Japan: Becoming a Japanese Waste Management Specialist

        I wish there was a monetary incentive to organize and dispose of our waste in a similar manner. We have single-stream recycling where I live but it's common knowledge that it all just ends up in the landfill since China will no longer take our sub-standard recyclables. A sad state of affairs.

        • bill
          Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
          3 weeks ago

          Americans—not known for their sparseness—average between two hundred and ten and two hundred and fifty pounds. It can be difficult to experience one’s own efforts at recycling as meaningful, but it’s easy and horrifying to picture being followed around by one’s own personal many-tonned monster of trash.

          Parts of this don’t apply to me because I live full-time on an RV. I know exactly how much waste I make and it’s very little. I’m proud about the one teeny-tiny bag I toss in the dumpster every once in a while. Almost zero food-scraps and I often eat three meals at home.

          (Also, if the New Yorker wishes to have more global appeal/relevance, they should stop using the term “American” to refer to US Americans. The Americas are two entire continents.)

          • jeff
            ScoutScribe
            3 weeks ago

            US Americans

            The only other person I've ever heard say this is the 2007 South Carolina Miss Teen USA contestant and it sounds just as silly to me now as it did back then.

            "Americans" refers to those who live in the United States of America. "North Americans" and "South Americans" refer to those who live in North America or South America. Why would it make sense to have a term for people who live in two separate continents?

            • bill
              Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
              3 weeks ago

              lol That's the thing!! I feel like 2007 South Carolina Miss Teen USA when I use the term "US Americans." It's almost always followed by a nervous chuckle.

              Why would it make sense to have a term for people who live in two separate continents?

              Because these two separate continents have a ton of human history in common: Colonization. Before the arrival of Europeans, this entire half of the planet was completely different. Then, rapidly, everything changed. A bunch of conquistadors came over, killed almost everyone, and stole all the land and resources.

              "Native Americans" are the people who were here first, before all of that shit went down. Thus "Americans" are what we all are now - the mixed descendants of all that carnage.

              Anyway, as I said, I feel completely unnatural calling myself a "US American" versus the much easier "American."

    • jeff
      ScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Really good stuff! I'm all for charging people for the amount of waste they produce. It just makes sense. Imagine how much more energy would be wasted if we were charged a flat rate for electricity.

      “But also I say the government shouldn’t act directly. There needs to be an intermediary between the government and the people. Groups like us. That can explain back and forth. People don’t want to hear it straight from the government.”

      This is really smart. I feel like this approach could help to depoliticize any policy proposals and make it more likely to be accepted by the public.

      • Alexa
        ScoutScribe
        3 weeks ago

        Yes, I am so with you here! I really liked where they charged for bin waste but not for compost/recycling that has a potential for reuse or recycling.

        I can't even fathom the electricity flat rate comparison, i remember having water included in my rent and we'd fill up a swimming pool without batting an eye ha. Yikes!

    • crystalhanakim3 weeks ago

      Really enjoyed this article. I stayed with family in Korea over the summer, and for the first time, I paid attention to how they got rid of waste. Having to get rid of food waste separately definitely made me more aware and mindful of what I was throwing away. This is motivating me to look into composting in my neighborhood!

      • Alexa
        ScoutScribe
        3 weeks ago

        had the same response! sent me down a total rabbithole of composting options in my area. while we have small scale food composting in my area, we are lacking anything larger/industrial for compostable cups & other fare. My chickens get most of the food scraps so at least thats handled!

    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Perfect morning read. Interesting, informative, and thought-provoking. Society changes when people change. And people change when they learn and experience new things.