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    The New Yorker | Joy Williams | 12/3/18 | 17 min
    6 reads8 comments
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    The New Yorker
    6 reads
    10
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    • Karenz1 year ago

      The rhythm in this story took me back to the absurdist play, Waiting for Godot. For me, it was a tale with no solace but compelling in its sequencing of events, odd characters coming and going, the mother’s predicament. I’m asking myself if I’m glad I read it. It has made me think, a plus. But it hasn’t been helpful for my end of life insecurities.

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        1 year ago

        Amazing comment.

        I’m having end of life jitters in the middle of my life. Any good reading suggestions? (Recently, I found Journal of a Solitude by May Sarton. It has loosened and wiggled more insecurities than I can count, but page after page blows it all away like a storm or a sunset, or a moment of tenderness with a friendly kitten.)

        • Karenz1 year ago

          Bill, I think anything you read by Jungian writers would be helpful. James Hollis has Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life. Just about anything by James Hollis is excellent. Murray Stein has In Midlife: A Jungian Perspective. I read that book by May Sarton—superb!! I wouldn’t go thru mid-life again for immortality but what I learned in that trip has made me a very happy baby boomer!!

          • bill
            Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
            1 year ago

            Amazing. James Hollis it is!

            • Karenz1 year ago

              Let me know what you think.

              • bill
                Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
                4 months ago

                1 year later, I still owe you a reply on this! ;)

    • Pegeen
      Scribe
      1 year ago

      I am not well read concerning fiction. I found this story compelling, pulled along by the shear oddity and beauty of her writing. I feel it’s an authentic voice, a real original thinker, not someone trying to be one. If I’m ignorant, so be it, I loved this.

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        1 year ago

        I’m with you all the way. Reading this felt like stepping in and out of consciousness. I couldn’t think of a reasonable comment because the entire experience was more like a meditation, a poem, and a lesson in letting go of needing to make sense of every detail. In other words, I didn’t “get it” but I don’t think I care. The writing is wild. The world of the story was fantastical. Not our world. And because of that, I felt: why try to figure it all out instead of just enjoying the ride?