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    The New Yorker | Sarah Blackwood | 5/11/20 | 5 min
    15 reads7 comments
    9.4
    The New Yorker
    15 reads
    9.4
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    • Gatsby3 weeks ago

      It’s amazing what she was able to capture with the camera technology she had at the time.

    • Alexa
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Brigman's work is remarkable, especially given the era she lived. Plus, a little excitement for me with her passion for my local area.

      Her work reminds me of renaissance nudes, so...NSFW I guess? (Is that still a thing in quarantine, does art count? idk, just fair warning...artistically nude women inside)

      The story is so neat, I want so much more of it, and oh the irony of her struggle (even post mortem) to be seen in the New York art scene.

      • Marijn3 weeks ago

        Totally agree. Can we get a broader story, more in-depth about her life and get the exposition to happen after all?

        • Alexa
          Top reader this weekScoutScribe
          3 weeks ago

          RIGHT. It makes me want her work to get to NY so badly after all of this, even if it means we wheatpaste it in the streets. What a tale.

    • Pegeen3 weeks ago

      Oh Alexa, what an incredible gift you have given to me!!!!!!!!!!! What a treasure, a discovery, an absolute gem! You have NO idea the impact this has had on me. I have been a devotee of the female nude for as long as I can remember. I find the female form interesting in all respects. As an artist, I have celebrated her in my own abstracted way over and over. I was a personal trainer and massage therapist and felt such admiration and awe in the many expressions of the female form. How miraculous our bodies, to endure all the complications of our hormonal rhythms and, of course, the grand opus, giving birth. It is disappointing that some men may never fully appreciate our deep complexities, our worth beyond the outward flesh. Thankfully we have each other. I’m truly blown away by how far ahead of her time Brigman was - a true visionary. What arduous work just to get to the locations to shoot. What strength, what devotion and passion.I LOVE the sepia tone of her photographs, the astounding sensuality, the blending of her subjects with the natural surroundings. I truly can’t say enough. This is a keeper and one story I will delve further into. I want to know more about Brigman and view more of her work. This has made my day! And Readup is SUCH a wild ride - yesterday I was having coffee with the Deadly Hornet and today wowed by an artist that I never heard of!!! Readup, you are a treasure, a bringer of delightful gifts and I pray each day for your success. You are SO needed!!! Can you feel my enthusiasm!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • Alexa
        Top reader this weekScoutScribe
        3 weeks ago

        Oh my days I just got goosebumps I am so thrilled you had this reaction, it is so similar to what I felt when I stumbled upon her work. I only wish I had been a member at my museum already when her work was exhibited in my town.

        Did you see this short walkthrough of her work too? I stumbled upon it last night and plan to watch tonight.

        I'm blown away too, they all look like fairy nymphs with a touch of warrior goddess at the same time. It's sensual but without the subjugation or implied-sex you see in a lot of early erotic art.

        It's incredible. I've long had a soft spot for women who create art of nude women myself, there is a real difference in the portrayal and the eye when it comes from a female gaze. Very glad to be fangirling with you, I can't believe I have never heard of her before either.

        And, that is definitely a wild ride! I really needed Brigman after the murder hornets, ACK. lol

    • deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      3 weeks ago

      Brigman’s commitment to the nude was both aesthetic and philosophical; she believed it to be the greatest form for expressing, as she put it (echoing Whitman, her favorite writer), “the clean, strong freedom of body and soul.”