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    The Atlantic | Caitlin Flanagan | 5/5/20 | 10 min
    6 reads5 comments
    9.8
    The Atlantic
    6 reads
    9.8
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    • Pegeen
      Top reader this weekScribe
      1 month ago

      Perspective is everywhere and a gateway to extreme gratitude if you care to look around. And I care to, every day, because there is always something bright and beautiful in the storm of sadness and overwhelm. Right when the sheltering in place happened, I heard an owner of a business, that I frequent, just got diagnosed with breast cancer. It has stayed with me, this perspective, and the many others I have viewed/read about since. It could always be worse - always. It could be dying alone in a hospital. Surrounded by others dying alone. Read this article if you are having a bad day.

      • bill
        Top reader this weekTop reader of all timeScoutScribe
        1 month ago

        ❤️

    • Florian
      Top reader this weekReading streakScribe
      1 month ago

      What an amazing story. So powerful and inspiring.

    • EZ19691 month ago

      I am blown away she has had so many years with stage 4 breast cancer. Thankfully, some people do. I love hearing her voice during this crisis. She is speaking for a community that has been drowned out by all the noise on either side of them. As people refuse to wear masks I wish they could pause and think about this mother and her children.

    • bill
      Top reader this weekTop reader of all timeScoutScribe
      1 month ago

      The fear you feel when you’re waiting to hear the results of a cancer scan is different from when you’re in physical danger. You have the same adrenaline overload but you can’t go into fight-or-flight. You can’t even freeze. You have to keep putting one foot after the other: out of the parking garage, into the lobby, into the elevator. You have to have a nurse check your vitals and you have to sit on the table with the white paper.

      Heavy. Powerful perspective. I can’t imagine being on either side of that conversation, as a a patient (“am I going to die?”) or doctor (“you are[n’t] going to die.”)

      Today is a good day for gratitude. I’m glad Caitlin Flanagan didn’t die a decade ago - she’s written so much great stuff in the meantime!