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    The Atlantic | Ian Bogost | 1/16/20 | 12 min
    21 reads12 comments
    9.1
    The Atlantic
    21 reads
    9.1
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    • skrt8 months ago

      This article is amazing and has given me so much food for thought. Love the invocation of Auge; I'm definitely going to look into more of his theory on non-places. However, I'm not certain I buy into the author's superspatial theory completely. By describing someone doing work on their phone at the dinner table as "transporting to the office" or buying plane tickets off an app as "transporting to the ticket counter" feels a lot like the early promoters of the Internet trying to attract users by comparing it to the real world. In reality, using Slack on your bed feels nothing like being in the office, and I agree that this is definitely a problem.

      I would almost argue the opposite of this statement from the author: "These changes hollow out the spaces where specific activities once took place. The unique vibe and spiritual energy of the record shop or the clothing boutique evaporate away once Spotify or Amazon takes over for them." Instead, although home has become a prison of convenience, does that not make physical experiences all the more special? The aesthetic and constancy of the Internet is something I personally easily tire of. And while I agree that the Internet has infiltrated into our lives inescapably, I wonder if spending most of our time in superspaces gives us a better appreciation of spaces that are simply single-purpose, just like the old days.

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        8 months ago

        The aesthetic and constancy of the Internet is something I personally easily tire of.

        I’ve been chewing on this comment for a while! Lots of good stuff!

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        8 months ago

        Excellent comment.

        doing work on their phone at the dinner table as "transporting to the office" or buying plane tickets off an app as "transporting to the ticket counter"

        I do feel like the black mirror transports us, but I think less about the geo/spatial aspect of “transportation” and more about time. When we’re not online, it’s easier to be in the present moment, using all five senses to take in the world around us. But, speaking personally, when I hit the black mirror, I feel flung into the future (anxieties) or the past (depression.) Reading online is one of the only digital things that I can do that’s feels present - which is why it’s a gift.

    • Abarlet10 months ago

      Having a home office for the past 2-3 decades and smart devices and computer technology all over the house, I find there are days I never need to leave the house. In fact I would much prefer to watch an exciting movie in my pajamas on my comfy sofa. I love the peace and quiet of home but it’s not a good balance. Now there are plenty of days I look for reasons to get out of the house. Isn’t that weird?

      • Pegeen
        Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
        10 months ago

        I appreciate your honesty. Being aware is the first step towards change. Maybe just getting outside for fresh air is reason enough!

    • Pegeen
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      10 months ago

      Easily a 10, one of the best articles I have read on Readup. I grew up in the 60’s, so what has been lost to technology is glaring. Loved these: ...”non-place, a family of transitional locations where people’s sense of self becomes suppressed or even vanishes.” ...”a massive overabundance of dead space devoted to individual rather than collective activity.” “The possibilities available outside the home were far greater than those within its walls.” “Now home is a prison of convenience that we need special help to escape.” So much to reflect upon and consider. Of course I love aspects of technology but I can easily disconnect and enjoy the silence and beauty of nature. It freaks me out to think what people will be like in the future.

      • jbuchana10 months ago

        To see where we might be headed, check out the society in Asimov's "The Naked Sun." Many years ago when I read this, it seemed pretty far-out, but looking at it today, well, it looks like we might be headed there.

        • Pegeen
          Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
          10 months ago

          I’m not sure I want to see it! But thanks for the suggestion.

    • Jessica10 months ago

      Now home is a prison of convenience that we need special help to escape.

      This must relate to the rise in loneliness as well. If so much is at our fingertips, why leave home? Less interacting with others, and before we know it, it’s harder to get out than to stay in.

    • jbuchana10 months ago

      Superpace is everywhere you are, but do you always want to be there? It seems that most people have made that decision, if for no other reason than default.

      "If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice" -Rush

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        10 months ago

        Great find. I love Bogost.

    • jeff
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      10 months ago

      I love the convenience of superspaces and efficiency of non-places but the author does a great job of articulating some of what has been lost to progress. It takes real effort to not just Netflix and Fresh Direct one's life away. With these great amenities comes great responsibility.