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    • Alexa
      ScoutScribe
      4 days ago

      EXCITED! I have devoured Shafaks books once I learned about her, v pumped to check this one out. It sounds gorgeous, and perfectly timed as the end of fig season wraps up in my neck of the woods

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
        4 days ago

        Alexa, at the library right now and she has many here. Where should I start?

        • Alexa
          ScoutScribe
          4 days ago

          oh man, one of those times i wish i had notifications haha.

          Her nonfiction mini "How to Stay Sane in An Age of Division" is beautiful if you just want something charming and uplifting that isn't sugarcoated. I've read it like 4x (easily) and given copies to at least 6 people, it's a fast read.

          10 minutes and 38 seconds in this strange world is my #1, I loved the characters and their diversity and the narrative she worked with. It made my heart sing. I haven't read 40 rules of love yet, i think i'll have to pick that up next too!

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
        4 days ago

        Choosing The 40 Rules of Love first. Feel free to rank them personally for me if you have time.

    • Pegeen
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      5 days ago

      This novel sounds intriguing. I love the idea of a Fig Tree narrating some of the chapters.

    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Kostas and Defne’s love story is foreshadowed by the equally dangerous fate of Yusuf and Yiorgos, a gay couple on the island who ran the tavern where the fig tree once lived. The beauty of their love story and resilience is further enhanced by the frailty and pain suffered by those left behind.

      The self-possession that Shafak’s women characters come to embody slowly unravels under the burden of trauma. Defne’s defiance and motivation to love Kostas despite opposition and to continue living and working in the island in the aftermath of the civil war is neither unconventional nor unarticulated. However, the tragic wounds of the war and her subsequent choices leave an indelible mark both on her life and Ada’s psyche, as well as on her sister Meryem’s life.

      There is a Turkish saying, mentioned in the book, which says that if you weep for all the sorrows in the world, in the end you will have no eyes. The Island of Missing Trees is the story of an island whose people are missing, erased by the horrors of war. To honour their lives and stories, we may want to read this novel even if it means having no eyes in the end.

      Adding to read list. Still dreaming of the day I finally meet a Turkish Loverboy. 😘. For a hot sec was chatting with a seemingly wonderful one on Grindr; one whom never materialized into 3D. 🤔