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    Ness Labs | 1/28/21 | 5 min
    8 reads12 comments
    9.3
    Ness Labs
    8 reads
    9.3
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    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Really Great Read.

      Literally just got off a phone call with someone and We Care Deeply about One Another - we were discussing a controversial issue while asking one another questions and in healthy allowance responses.

      I really dig this Greek Illumination, personally, while acknowledging openly that it could be bullshit: 😉

      The Greek philosopher Socrates defined intellectualism as the process through which “one will do what is right or best just as soon as one truly understands what is right or best.”

      • bill
        Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
        2 weeks ago

        Without necessarily revealing your stance on the “controversial issue,” do you mind sharing what it was? I’m curious.

        It happened to me recently re: covid vaccines. (And it’s ironic because now I feel strongly like I don’t feel strongly about it. lol)

        • DellwoodBarker
          Top reader this weekScribe
          2 weeks ago

          Same topic. Yes. I haven’t gotten one yet and this person I was speaking to was encouraging me to do so. I asked about her experiences - I have been asking a lot of folks who have received it what their post experiences are.

          My questioning has less to do with conspiracies of chips and more to do with a grounded question of Are We Giving Our Individual Power Away if We As individuals know our bodies best and also just questioning how fast the vaccine has been developed? Of course I am reminded that our tech is faster. I don’t feel ashamed or silly for asking all these questions, personally. It is Our Health We often give our power away in. I know these are ironic statements as the vaccine is supposed to help rescue our combined health.

          Bottom line is if I end up needing to receive it for employment that I just can’t turn down or something essential - like International Travel (which I undoubtedly want to experience)- I Will. For now I have read that a lot of people who want it can’t get it so I would rather (as a healthy young adult) allow others who really want it receive it first.

          That is transparency of the issue here.

          I strive to Question Authority from a very grounded level like: is being forced to do any under authority taking our power away? Is being forced to wear masks a civil right issue? (I wear one out of respect when I need to; I pull it down so I can breath when outside and no one walking by).

          Hopefully my honesty here doesn’t get me in trouble or stir up a hornets nest.

          peeks through fingertips

          I am Open To and Willing To Be wrong...

          And I look back to being vaccinated as a child and here I am...

          It’s all curious...

          • bill
            Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
            2 weeks ago

            🎯

            Congrats- you're clearly a human being who practices critical thinking and empathy. Sounds like you're thinking for yourself while drawing on expert advice. Whether or not you get the shot tomorrow or never is not even the point. The point is that you're weighing it all out and making your own decision. It's especially altruistic that you're thinking about the collective health of society as well.

            I have deep respect for some folks who are all about the vaccine (even to the extent that they're taking an activist stance that others should get it too) as well as people who are deeply committed to refusing it, and telling others "don't." To me, where you end up isn't the point. What matters is that you can demonstrate "I thought for myself about this," rather than just repeating whatever your "party line" is.

            My biggest pet peeve is "Science says," because "science" doesn't say stuff. People do.

            • DellwoodBarker
              Top reader this weekScribe
              2 weeks ago

              This Reply Is Greatly Appreciated.

              For individuals who don’t know my 2019 it would probably be helpful to write it out at some point to add further perspective to where I and many in our community were coming from months prior to the official declaration of the virus.

              Long story short I was in a men’s shelter until end of 2019 and many of us there and in our community were at death’s door with a mysterious wave of pneumonia like intensity. I was at deaths door.

              I felt guided to focus on Self-Healing through the whole ordeal with the aid of Listening to remedies coming through Deep Channels of Community (specifically Native American guides)... so OSHA Root I Credit as a Major, Major Source of pulling through along with herbal teas and such. I had folks telling me to go to the hospital yet i inherently trusted that I would pull through. I was even able to heal a vulnerable rib pain from coughing via Yoga in the months to follow.

              I question why we as a whole do not pursue more of these avenues yet I know my story is not the same as others.

              Why isn’t things like OSHA being touted as possible remedies? Mind you, it is an intense root cure so maybe not for everyone? I can’t say.

              Anyway, coming out of those months where many of us in hindsight feel we experienced the virus months prior to it even landing on Mass Conscioussness radar created an unusual courage.

              Possibly a naive courage, yes. I have not feared the virus as a result. However, I do not take lightly the possible role of being a carrier and would not want to be the cause of an elder’s death, etc.

              This whole experience has been a wild ride and I am grateful for experiencing with my community and state in the way we have.

              When we know that the pharmaceutical companies bank on $$$$ - it is a valuable question to ask - are the cures being driven by an actual desire to Heal or to line more bank accounts?

              We hope it is the former.

              This is a taste of where my head was at prior to the pandemic and during.

              • bill
                Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
                2 weeks ago

                Wow. Deep. Thanks for sharing.

                One day I'll write my "pandemic story" (I hope! But I've got too much to write about!) but for now I'll just tell you a little snippet because it relates to what you're describing:

                A few months after the outbreak began in the USA, I began dating a man who was HIV+. On the one hand, I realized that science is amazing. Thanks to the marvel of modern medicine, we didn't have to limit our physical intimacy. I just had to take start taking a pill. I did tons of research and the deeper I went the more I felt like the problem with covid was a problem of mass hysteria. But also, science is a miracle! We should listen. I was so so torn, day in and day out.

                So, anyway, there I was, doing my homework, trying to balance risk (to self and others) with living the life I wanted to have and believe that I deserve. Everyone deserves! And then I'm taking out the garbage or meditating in a park without a mask on and people confront me, tell me I'm being selfish, that I'm putting others at risk. To say I felt "alone" is an understatement. Both sides felt crazy. Still do, to be honest.

                In dystopia, nobody has good information so it's impossible to make smart decisions about anything. The result is chaos. In utopia, reliable information is available to those who want it, and everyone feels empowered and free to make their own decisions. It doesn't mean that people don't still get sick and die. But at least we handle it all with confidence and grace and clarity.

                For me, the world seems so irrationally out of whack - not making smart tradeoffs; not actually doing what would keep the most people healthy. Big family gatherings make us healthy. Locking ourselves up does not. This is obvious, but: Mental health matters, physically!

                When you mentioned Osha root for COVID, I was kinda like "wait, is this guy nuts?" and then I remembered that when my elderly neighbor had COVID I was telling her: water, tea with ginger and lemon, hydrate hydrate hydrate, and be sure to get fresh air and stay positive. She was fine a few days later.

                Then again, so many people pass COVID around with zero symptoms, and the point isn't about how to handle a nasty, unknown flu, it's about how to handle a pandemic for an entire country.

                Again: I seriously don't know. I continue to limit my exposure to others, but I absolutely REFUSE to obey the law in my town that says I'll go to jail if I walk in the park without a mask. Instead, I go there daily and dance, without a mask on, just to make a point. I dare you to arrest me, I say to myself, and I think of myself as an activist.

                One thing about being openly "uncertain" or "confused" or even "dead wrong" - especially when the stakes are high - is that people ignore you or shame you and tell you to "get a clue."

                I think. I dunno. Honestly, this thread is starting to make me feel nervous.

                • DellwoodBarker
                  Top reader this weekScribe
                  2 weeks ago

                  Perhaps more of us need to share our pandemic stories from a space of personal perspective and balance; not attack or shame.

                  This feels freeing and necessary.

                  Thanks for sharing yours!

                  I Imagine there is no reason to be nervous.

                  Also, I acknowledge that pandemic stories on small towns compared to urban/high-populated will yield Very Differently.

                  I Imagine if I had been in more densely populated areas my anxiety and nervousness will have been way higher. Maybe not.

            • DellwoodBarker
              Top reader this weekScribe
              2 weeks ago

              Regarding -

              My biggest pet peeve is "Science says," because "science" doesn't say stuff. People do.

              One of (many; depending on the moment) my favorite indie-sci-if horror film scenes addresses this topic in a fashion. I adore the films of Justin Benson and Aaron Morehead because they dabble in the bizarre while adding Grounded Moments.

              In Spring - probably my favorite of theirs to date (I haven’t seen Synchronic yet and want to) - there is a favorite scene in a historical chapel where the central leads discuss how in history what was once considered “woo-woo” is later scientifically proven. I adore these reminders. The stories of Galileo and Hypatia remind us as well.

    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      The times in my life when I have had to tell people, “I’m wrong,” have undeniably been better for me as a person than the times where I’ve been 100% nail-on-the-head correct.

      I find it very interesting to consider the ways in which we have to battle our own nature in order to elevate ourselves as humans. Makes life so spicy.

    • SEnkey
      Scout
      3 weeks ago

      it’s better to be a fool for a minute than to be a fool for life.

      Love that. Something I picked up from my brother is the phrase "I'm willing to be wrong on this". He'll say that as a way to signal that he is open to conflicting information and wants to learn.

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekScribe
        3 weeks ago

        Finish many a dialogue statement with I Might Be Wrong, personally, as well...if I know that I cannot Speak True or even More Confidently True-True on a topic.

        Excellent perspectives to Open Us More.

    • Pegeen
      Reading streakScoutScribe
      3 weeks ago

      Loved this article. Great insights. “At it’s core, the art of being less wrong is the art of being curious.”