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    lapham’s quarterly | 11 min
    3 reads6 comments
    9.0
    lapham’s quarterly
    3 reads
    9.0
    You must read the article before you can post or reply.
    • TranquilHaze1 month ago

      Enjoyable read that provides the framework to understand the development of some of our global economic systems still utilized today.

      • thorgalle
        Scribe
        1 month ago

        Your comment is about the article "Synecdoche, Illinois", about Peoria, right? Readup wrongly parsed the title as "Contributor", and to me your comment doesn't seem to match that article. I think it's more about the history of Peoria and the American Midwest stereotype than about global economic systems? 🤔

        In what sense does the article provide this framework?

        1. Update (3/2/2021):

          But in any case: thanks for scouting. This was an interesting read 🙂

        • TranquilHaze1 month ago

          Not sure why it became altered during posting, however, this linked article is not the original article I posted, I'll read this new one as well, but below is the one I originally read and shared. link

          • thorgalle
            Scribe
            1 month ago

            Woah, thanks for the link! Your original comment actually made me want to read that article. Oh well, the other one was nice too. I see Readup is really conflating these articles. I'll bug-report it :)

            • TranquilHaze1 month ago

              Being from the Midwest, I found this erroneously posted article enjoyable as well.

    • thorgalle
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      “Will it play in Peoria?”

      What a solid way to analyze a sentence I have never heard about! Interesting piece on American history and stereotype, and how habitual language used today still can lead to misguided perceptions.

      But in place of nuance, hard truths, and tricky patches of history, it’s easier and comforting to pick up a couple of pieces and hold them up as the whole.

      when the Peorias of our imagination eclipse the Peorias of reality —omission becomes erasure

      I'm reading the book 1984 now, this made me think about that. Though in 1984's world, it's worse. We can say "erasure becomes non-existence". Or unexistence.