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    harpers.orgBERTRAND RUSSELL10/1/3226 min
    9 reads4 comments
    8.3
    harpers.org
    9 reads
    8.3
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    • DellwoodBarker
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      The closing paragraph and this excerpt Really Stood Out here (in addition to previous comments already shown):

      If you ask him what he thinks the best part of his life, he is not likely to say, “I enjoy manual work because it makes me feel that I am fulfilling man’s noblest task, and because I like to think how much man can transform his planet. It is true that my body demands periods of rest, which I have to fill in as best I may, but I am never so happy as when the morning comes and I can return to the toil from which my contentment springs.” I have never heard working men say this sort of thing. They consider work, as it should be considered, as a necessary means to a livelihood, and it is from their leisure hours that they derive whatever happiness they may enjoy.

    • Walter_Sobchak1 week ago

      An excellent read. It sheds a lot of light upon the idea of unnecessary toil.

      • DellwoodBarker
        Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
        1 week ago

        💯

    • deephdave
      Top reader this weekTop reader of all timeReading streakScout
      1 week ago

      In a world where no one is compelled to work more than four hours a day every person possessed of scientific curiosity will be able to indulge it, and every painter will be able to paint without starving, however excellent his pictures may be. Young writers will not be obliged to draw attention to themselves by sensational pot-boilers, with a view to acquiring the economic independence needed for monumental works, for which, when the time at last comes, they will have lost the taste and the capacity.

      "We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living." ― R. Buckminster Fuller

      PS: Everything is content now