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    Esquire | Kelly Stout | 4/16/20 | 16 min
    26 reads6 comments
    8.8
    Esquire
    26 reads
    8.8
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    • Tonianni4 days ago

      I just subscribed to get Fish Oil every month - because there was a discount, but I planned to cancel when the next one comes in. I always plan to cancel and then sometimes I forget.

    • Plum4 days ago

      ...an early but indelible lesson that anything describing itself as a “system” will come with some measure of pain......I love this sentence. My solution -a few times I have reported my credit card lost and gotten a new one to scrub out subscriptions I sometimes unknowingly have accumulated.

    • gmclean4 days ago

      So easy to fall into these things. I recently did a scrub of all my subscriptions and dropped a few, not just physical ones but these days apps fall into this category. Why was I paying £3.99 a month for a calendar app I rarely used?

      There is some level of irony in the subtle “subscribe to Esquire” message that appears halfway through though

    • pandemia
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I would say this is typcal american life style. Subscription is the golden egg of marketing and business. You should know it without waiting to read it in a magazine, sorry.

      subscription + credit card = debt.

      My number 1 rule is no recurring payment, ever. Zero. Nada.

    • Alexa
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      very entertaining read with a smart reminder that too much convenience can blur the joyfully rough edges of living life.

      I don’t know, because the truth is I’m not in a club, I’m just in the shower, and there’s no one else in here to see me cry.

    • deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      1 week ago

      Stop hoarding, unsubscribe and live clutter-free life.

      In her book How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy, Jenny Odell makes a compelling case for leisure time—not leisure time as “side hustle” or “monetizable” or even something that will improve the self, but as recreation for no reason.