1. We are a community of readers. Join us!

    Readup is a social reading platform. No ads. No distractions. No liking or upvotes. We help you pay attention to what matters: reading.

    Distributed.blog | 1/9/20 | 13 min
    5 reads5 comments
    10
    Distributed.blog
    5 reads
    10
    PadlockYou must read the article before you can post or reply.
    • Plum5 months ago

      I like his idea about how too many meetings talking about wok doesn’t let us do the work. Love the of long form-getting ideas out in writing and going deep then having coworkers reflect on them. A little like Read up!

    • Jessica5 months ago

      I’ve always been fascinated by Jason Fried and his approach to Basecamp. It’s a very trusting, thoughtful, and generous approach. I wonder how these principles could be applied to large corporations, perhaps outside of tech.

    • deephdave
      Top reader this weekReading streakScout
      5 months ago

      An amazing article that emphasizes the work culture and how bragging about working for more hours is not the right way to accomplish. By using productivity tools efficiently, avoiding unnecessary meetings to get things done. Focus on working strategically, spending around 40 hours a week.

    • jbuchana
      Scout
      6 months ago

      This is a great philosophy. Not only would workplaces be better off when run in this manner, the benefits would filter out to the rest of society.

    • Alexa
      Scout
      6 months ago

      Agh, so many juicy nuggets here.

      I love this idea in the intro:

      “When I look at my watch, it gives me the time. It asks nothing in return. It’s a loyal companion without demands. In contrast, if I look at my phone for the time, it takes my time. It tempts me.”

      And then, they get into the finite vs infinite game theory of business. I see SO many tech co's seem to be playing a finite game (playing to win rather than playing to stay in the game). They hustle like crazy so they can sell big and be done.

      What if startups asked "should we scale?" instead of "could we scale?".

      This fast flip mentality has made for some weird sh** in the tech world, I'd love to see more of this mindful, slow, thoughtful approach to building companies...esp the attention they give to supporting their employees to live a good life.