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    americanpurpose.com | Adam Garfinkle | 2/1/21 | 21 min
    6 reads2 comments
    9.3
    americanpurpose.com
    6 reads
    9.3
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    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScoutScribe
      2 months ago

      So intense!

      This is loud, exuberant writing. And dense. Lots of hard-hitting proof that, yes, life now is, in fact, surreal.

      We see more, and more rapid, scene cuts per minute in commercials than in regular programming because, although they cost marginally more to make, viewers who are made more alert during commercials through the multiplication of scene shifts are more likely to remember and hence to buy the product. So advertisers judge the added expense to be cost-effective. We may think ourselves immune to consumerist sirens, but, statistically at least, we are easily influenced moist robots.

      Many people in advanced-wired technological environments now experience more mediated images than real ones. Data on the average waking hours that Americans spend sitting in front of screens are shocking and still rising. On college campuses, very large percentages of students are neurobiologically addicted to their phones, thereby shaping their brains in ways that appear to be busily undoing the “revolution in the brain”-circuitry created by generations of their deep-literate forebears.

    • jeff
      Top reader this weekTop reader of all timeReading streakScout
      2 months ago

      Spectacular article!

      I'm not as pessimistic as the author. I still think we can handle the post-truth, but the analysis is spot on and filled with many interesting observations.

      Since so much of the human environment is man-made by dint, for example, of technological endeavor, we witness a kind of loop of self-actualization driving human history. As Erving Goffman put it in 1974 in Frame Analysis, “Society takes up and freezes into itself the conceptions we have of it.”

      Love thinking about cultural loops.