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    The New York Times Company | Amanda Hess | 5/1/20 | 5 min
    11 reads6 comments
    8.3
    The New York Times Company
    11 reads
    8.3
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    • jbuchana
      Scribe
      4 weeks ago

      One gets the sense that for the bookcase-background type, being judged by their home libraries is a secret dream finally realized

      I'm going to avoid bragging about my bookcases here...

      The appearance of the credibility bookcase suggests that the levers of expertise and professionalism are operating normally, even though they are very much not.

      I'd noticed the bookcase background being used, but I never really gave it any thought until this argument. It's amusing to wonder if any of those books have actually been read. I'm sure the Britanica hasn't been used in a while.

      • SEnkey
        Top reader this weekScoutScribe
        4 weeks ago

        Hey jbuchana, I think bookcase bragging should be a new reality tv show. Each episode goes in someones home where they show off their shelves and then talk about their favorites, the most challenging, the least liked, and the ones they are still trying to get to (a la Taleb's antilibrary). That is reality tv I might watch...of course I also watch bookTV on CSPAN. sigh.

    • Alexa
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      hilarious, the newest iteration of virtue signaling.

      I recall recently, and I lament not remember the context, watching a video where it was obviously filmed in front of a fake bookcase backdrop and it completely distracted me from what i was watching.

      I've been keyed into the importance of backgrounds for a while with my work online and watching everyone wake up to it is hilarious. Second only to the horrifying zoom meeting fails...

      • SEnkey
        Top reader this weekScoutScribe
        4 weeks ago

        Ha! One more example where it is more important to seem than to be. People want to appear as a person who is well read more than they want to be a well read person.

    • ChetD4 weeks ago

      Thanks for the reminder. I will be checking my bookshelf to remove any tawdry books and replace with high brow hardcovers.

    • SEnkey
      Top reader this weekScoutScribe
      4 weeks ago

      Ha! I was in front of this trend years ago....but more because there isn't a room in my house not full of books. My wife has taken to counting them and reminding me of how many we own each time we move...which is frequent. But it's hard to let go of books I love and want my children to love as well. If I knew which books would be important for them and which they would love I would save just those...oh well.