1. Join Readup to read with thorgalle.

    thorgalle
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    • The Atlantic | Alexis C. Madrigal | 8/16/13 | 3 min
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      3 days ago

      When your boss asked you to review that app and you said “sure, whatever”.

    • gizmodo.com | Shoshana Wodinsky | 1/15/21 | 13 min
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      3 days ago

      Good read! I wasn’t surprised about this, having read about WhatsApp metadata somewhere else on Readup before and generally not holding Facebook’s privacy practices in high regard, I was already accepting the situation. The WhatsApp debunking FAQ reached me quickly too, a friend even showed a front page ad on an Indian newspaper with the WhatsApp statement, explaining about the Business changes in broad terms.

      This article really explains the changes. Yet another way for Facebook company to make money out of their massive network and user’s personal data. What else is new. I appreciated the conversational tone of the article too!

      But by ignoring a lot of these nuances, the company’s left with hordes of people that filled this update with their own theories about what these seemingly sweeping privacy changes actually mean.

      1. Update (1/17/2021):

        This is the article on metadata I referred to. The one I read originally seems to have been (re)moved.

    • The Cleanest Line | Bonnie Tsui | 3/28/19 | 4 min
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      1 week ago

      That photo looks pretty nuts!

      They also take upwards of thirty snowboard trips a year

      Sounds fun but exhausting too! You’d have to live pretty close to mountains for this.

    • Wall Street Journal | Gabriel T. Rubin | 5 min
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      1 week ago

      This was the article I needed. Whatever just happened, it’s definitely possible that Mr. Trump will keep his right to run for an office in the future, because of various technicalities. “Impeached” sounds so final yet is mostly symbolical at this point. Let’s see!

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 1/11/21 | 3 min
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      1 week ago

      Some favorites here! Especially the Dead Zone (there wasn’t a better time to learn about viruses and Nordic necromancy), the marathon article (what an inspiration) and the drop-shipping article (a weird reality).

    • VRT NWS: nieuws | Flanders News | 1/10/21 | 3 min
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      1 week ago

      It’s hard to compare countries with so many factors influencing the curves: how many tests are done, how results are counted. In Belgium’s second wave the curve went way higher, but there was also much more testing.

      Taking conclusions from a quick look at a graph is dangerous. I’d rather let experts and authorities do (hopefully sound) analyses & read those carefully.

    • The New Yorker | John Hersey | 8/24/46 | 161 min
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      2 weeks ago

      The events on and after the first atomic bombing from the perspective of six survivors whose paths cross. Very old, but make no mistake, it's still very readable. Recommended!

      What I found weird from my millennial eyes is that concerns about radiation only appear three fourths in in this rather long read. This contrasts strongly to Chernobyl, the popular TV series, where the drama of the radiation is ever present.

      And yet it makes sense. Nuclear reactors are not designed to be bombs, I hope quite the contrary. I didn't know of the massive raw blast power and heat that this bomb unleashed. Its immediate aftermath was among the most gruesome scenes in the history of mankind, irrespective of radiation. That becomes crystal clear through this article.

      Thanks to Readup for helping me pick this article up again and again during the past 4 days!

    • gikken.co | 4 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Pretty cool privacy policy. Not as cool as Readup's, of course, but still good.

    • Cloakist – Blog | Louis Barclay | 12/11/20 | 5 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Louis, if the next 7 years don’t go according to plan, I’d suggest a pivot to comedy writer. I’m sure your mom will approve!

    • nicolasbouliane.com | 2 min
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      3 weeks ago

      I’m working on a personal website renewal, and for inspiration I was scouring through some related bookmarks I made over the years. On this site of Nicolas Bouliane, which I bookmarked in 2017, I found a small update on his recent site renewal that just PERFECTLY describes my feelings about my own website right now. Here's one good reference!

      My old website was a professional portfolio. It was built to attract recruiters. Now that I live from All About Berlin, the original website lost its purpose. In its place, I built a truly personal website to share things I care about.

      The original plan was to tell the story of my 6 month motorcycle trip. I grossly underestimated how hard it would be to document the trip as I'm experiencing it. Besides, a good story is better shared over a pint than over the net.

      Even that, lol.

      I'm also going for a headless content framework. Probably Contentful, but now checking out this Craft CMS he's using.

    • The Guardian | 12/18/20 | 4 min
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      3 weeks ago

      “I thought, ‘Oh, there’s something going on here if my kids are expecting our family to look like Ryan’s family.’ In Ryan’s family, they’re able to constantly consume content and products. They’re opening up a new toy every day, and subsequently playing with that new toy every day, so there’s this constant consumerism that’s being embedded within these messages for children.”

      This doesn't seem healthy.

    • Join Brave and change the web together | 4 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Jeff mentioned this browser yesterday, and I had no idea what they were doing! I think this is definitely an improvement over the ad business status quo.

      This article cites many of the same problems that Readup is addressing. But then the solution is really different. When Readup talks about "valuing attention", Readup talks about enabling deep, concentrated reading. When Brave talks about "valuing attention", Brave talks about you transparently selling your attention.

      For me, earning 5$/month for ~5 random system notification ads per hour (source) doesn't seem like a good deal though. I value my attention higher! In some way, attention, like time, is invaluable too. A life where all your attention is sold to other parties does not sound fulfilling.

      This reminds me of something I've read from Jaron Lanier years ago, where he suggested a user-controllable scale to decide to which degree one sells their data (& attention) to advertisers, but then for actual money rather than for "free" access to an online resource.

      While donating BAT to creators is encouraged in Brave, there still seems to be a way to fully opt-out of ads using Brave. This effectively enables free-riding. But, how would an online world look where each creator automatically requires a certain BAT payment per consumed resource? Whether that's gained by watching ads or by paying hard cash? I think Lanier mentioned some implications on the rich/poor division. Gotta read that article again.

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 12/7/20 | 4 min
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      thorgalle
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      1 month ago

      Great ponderings bill! Spot on.

      Regardless, there will never be a single solution to article “curation” or “discovery” online. And there shouldn’t be.

      I used to think of Pocket as a competitor, but now I don’t.

      You can even see Pocket as a dependency. Readup depends on Readers acting as scouts. Many scouts will consume primary sources (e.g. magazine sites), but many will also consume secondary, already-curated sources (Pocket, Reddit, review newsletters, ...). Readup isn't necessarily competing with curators. Readup is a meta-curator.

      It’s way harder to build a community than it is to build a utility.

      I also think it's harder to sell a community than it is to sell a utility. Or rather, a community should be sold in a different way. That makes the combination tricky.

      Sometimes I think that people won’t — and shouldn’t — stand for such abstraction.

      Amen. It's hard, but oh so necessary.

      I’ll admit that at first I was a little perturbed that the Best of Pocket list had so much overlap with the Readup AOTD list. But now I’m stoked about it.

      Another reason to be stoked: Pocket highlights 24 high quality reads at the end of the year. Readup has those, but also 341 more of them. One every day, throughout the whole year. You don't need to wait till the end of the year to find good reads on Readup.

    • CNBC | Karen Gilchrist | 3/21/19 | 5 min
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      1 month ago

      Cool! I wonder how she runs her “algorithm”. £1,500 sounds like it might have paid for a simple informational website, but not for a database of names with a custom web app and name selection algorithm.

      Maybe she used a low-code platform like Airtable? Or maybe there was later investment in the process?

      I have have run across this English naming trend with Chinese contacts. But I actually enjoy trying to learn their Chinese names.

    • WIRED | Cal Newport | 4/23/20 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      He’s basically arguing for an expert-only Medium for Reputable Institutions. Doesn’t sound like a bad idea. But then how did he see discussion on that Medium? Also expert-only?

      while the platforms would continue to work their algorithmic magic to amplify the more impactful content. The big change, however, is that this short-form content can now be pointing back to their longer, more stable elaborations.

      With the extant problem of short attention spans and not bothering to read behind the headlines. I wonder if Cal is aware of Readup?

    • Brussels Express | 2/7/18 | 4 min
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      1 month ago

      As a teenager I never bothered to learn what was really going on with this Brussel-Halle-Vilvoorde situation in 2010-2011. Indeed, the world just kept turning around. But it’s never too late to learn, I guess this was a decent summary!

    • Svenska Yle | Rikhard Husu | 12/1/20 | 6 min
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      1 month ago

      Interesting that I should learn about the corona-situation in my native Belgium of the past few months from a Finno-Swedish newspaper. Direct family conversations tend to revolve around details. Reporters from abroad take the outside view and can summarize what happened neatly.

      Also sad how the typically Belgian student habit of commuting home over the weekend might have caused a more severe second wave.

      Ett är säkert: julhelgerna kommer att tillbringas i en liten krets med det egna hushållet, säger Van Gucht.

      Yes sir.

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 11/24/20 | 5 min
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      1 month ago

      Wowowow, this experiment definitely bears watching! Loads of partial parallels with Readup.

      I appreciate that the author admits that it’s hard to predict what will happen, but at the same time sketches out some context and conditions of both platforms.

      That would be something truly new in social networks — intermittent financial rewards just for using the platform as intended.

      Is it possible that daily rewards paid directly to creators could create a healthier network than our current marketplaces for attention?

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 11/30/20 | 8 min
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      1 month ago

      Good point Bill, that comparing Readup to Spotify at this point can lead to confusion regarding Search.

      At the same time, maybe Readup's mid-term vision can be compared to Spotify's current state in some technical sense (having Search, or recommendations, "playlists", genres, groups, ...?). Or maybe not!

      That's what I find so exciting about Readup: there is a demonstrated current value, but how Readup will change while scaling is not obvious at all. One immediate unknown is how the reception will be after the paywall drops. How will the dynamics of Readup change? What part of the offering will be in focus in 3 years?

      Searching on Search Engine History (so meta), I read that the beginnings of Google ("BackRub") had the following unique feature:

      It ranked pages using citation notation, meaning any mention of a website on another site would count it as a vote toward the mentioned site

      Readup is upending the "article digestion industry" with another revolutionary voting mechanism. Let's see where it takes us!


      Some other specific comments:

      Readup, unlike Spotify, actually invented something — a completely new business model built on a technology that didn’t exist until we invented it.

      I'd argue that's mostly true, but not fully. AFAIK, the web read tracking technology is novel. Tying that to a community and leaderboard is too. Collecting money for creators without them being on the platform is also something mind-boggling I've never heard of. But... automatically giving cuts of subscription money to creators based on a subscribers' consumption pattern is not. It already existed for years with Flattr.

      Whether or not they’re destroying the music industry is definitely up for debate. What’s not up for debate is whether or not they’re revitalizing it. Because everyone knows they aren’t.

      The not revitalizing part might be an overgeneralization. According to this article, Spotify popularized genres like Latin pop that had a difficult time to sell in the times of radio. That said, I know they're not making it better for everyone (the article cites many "losers" as well).

    • TechCrunch | Alex Wilhelm, Ron Miller | 11/25/20 | 3 min
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      1 month ago

      This makes sense I think. It would make Salesforce a bit sexier. Heroku is already a part of Salesforce that feels less like the massive main CRM mastodon. Slack would similarly be a refreshing add.

    • CNBC | Kathy and Ross Petras | 11/25/20 | 5 min
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      1 month ago

      Somehow I found this difficult to read. Maybe it was the onslaught of spelled-out-syl-la-bles, maybe it was the fact that I read it while drinking a coffee on a café terrace at freezing point temperatures, with only a thin running jacket on.

      Anyway, I learned about ah-sigh-EE and the emphasis on mous-sah-KAH.

      Should they try to sound French and say "krwah-SAN?"

      Funny that the recommendation settled on the incorrect kwah-SAHWN, recognizing that that French 'r' is impossible to pronounce in spoken English, and that trying it might worsen things.

      This put me in French mood. I kicked off a Spotify radio with Ne me quitte pas from Jacques Brel for my run back home. Une bonne journée à tous!

    • thorgalle.me | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      OMG. This is SO OLD. Or at least that’s how it feels like, it’s actually only 3 years old (?!).

      I was first confused, but then immediately happy to see this pop up in my Readup notifications. Thanks for surfacing it @bill! I can almost read this purely as a reader now, I’m barely remembering anything beyond what I wrote. I guess that is a power of writing: saving memories beyond pictures.

      This tone of voice sounds so innocent, I’d dare say cute even. I’m sure revised it 20 times to work those periodic chuckles in there. Young Thor recounting the little but big adventures along an adventurous road. Ahhh. This was written by a 21-year-old student who hadn’t yet encountered realities of life such as “making money”, “working”, and “living on your own”. I don’t think I could (or want to) write in the same way again.

      That said, I LOVED reading this. I really need to do this cycling touring again. It’s GREAT. Maybe I can rediscover some of these moments. And I need to update my website. And see if I can still write anything about the three times longer journey I did in the summer of 2018 (nothing on that now).

      PS: I’m happy Readup picked up all the gallery images! But the 2 videos didn’t work on my phone. They’re not essential but pretty good too :)

    • Medium | Momo Estrella | 5/15/14 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      Surprisingly fun read! Realistic & impactful reminders are nice, but they don’t have to be a password. A daily non-password reminder I have is “Take B12” (a supplement), a good practice as a vegan that I used to overlook too often. This one is easy to fix and gratifying to be reminded of. Somehow I keep forgetting it in the morning rush. Just took one!

      The password has the additional benefits though of being needed multiple times a day, you need to spell it out consciously (especially when changing every month), and it usually appears as hidden characters. A valuable trick in the toolbox!

    • Scientific American | Kimberley R. Miner, Arwyn Edwards, Charles Miller, Kimberley R. Miner, Arwyn Edwards, Charles Miller | 5 min
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      1 month ago

      Interesting popular scientific article, but could maybe have been a bit less dense. I was aware of the "methanogenic" microbes problem, but I learned that there are also "methanotroph" microbes that would counter this dynamic.

      If you found this interesting I can really recommend this 15 min. read from a Washington Post Pulitzer winning series on climate change: "Radical warming in Siberia leaves millions on unstable ground ". That one is not so much about the bacteria, but provides more context & zooms in on the human aspects of this thawing. Including illegal mammoth tusk hunting!

    • The Atlantic | Helen Lewis | 10/27/20 | 11 min
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      1 month ago

      True, many interesting serious points. But I also liked the humorous tones.

      And so the nonstop reality-television show that is the Trump White House has been inescapable in London, to a degree that is disproportionate even considering America’s undoubted global influence. China makes our toys, our clothes, and our anti-COVID personal protective equipment, but occupies a fraction of our mental bandwidth.

      Good food for thought & action here. I heard of people specifically following Chinese media for this reason, and knowing of corona a month earlier. In Europe, Chinese affairs are definitely less covered than US affairs.

    • The GitHub Blog | Abby Vollmer | 11/16/20 | 10 min
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      1 month ago

      GitHub is definitely earning some street cred by erring on the developer side here and strengthening their claim check process after this screw-up of sorts.

      What I also find fascinating is how the linked patch removed only the "incriminating" explicit examples from the claim, and made GitHub able to reinstate that fork. Obviously the program could still be used for downloading 99.99% of the broader copy righted material, but the specific claim examples had now been addressed. So the claim could be ignored. What a dangerous & fine line to tread!

      But I'm happy we got youtube-dl back. When you have access to resources on the internet, you should be able to at least consume them however you want on your own devices. As long as you don't redistribute them illegally. That seems to be the general idea behind the DRM-free movement and behind youtube-dl. But it also has ties to what Readup is doing!

    • Esquire | Lauren Kranc | 3/20/20 | 3 min
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      2 months ago

      In a society that barrages us endlessly with methods for optimization and productivity, it is both hilarious and immensely gratifying to invest in a relatively pointless, albeit meticulous and comprehensive investigation.

      Smiling from ear to ear. I just listened to this episode (before reading this). It didn’t matter how dark November is both in terms of the season and the pandemic.

      I got to this article from a reference in my previously posted article about the hiker Mostly Harmless. But I heard the podcast already did a round on Readup some time ago.

      This is one more add to the great achievements of Reply All. I keep being amazed on how they can transform what must be a painstaking journey of uncertainty, research and planning into a captivating narrative.

    • WIRED | Nicholas Thompson | 11/2/20 | 18 min
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      2 months ago

      Fascinating! Definitely deserves an update too, I’ll set a reminder for February 2021. That’s another magical thing technology can do.

    • changelog.com | 6 min
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      2 months ago

      It should maybe be just a really powerful abstraction built on top of Git.

      Power users have made their scripts and aliases on top of git for years for maximum efficiency, but I haven't seen a beginner-friendly abstraction of the Git CLI yet.

      GitHub's recent CLI is going in the right direction though: when you make a pull request, it automatically handles branch tracking & branch pushing. When you merge a pull request, it asks if it should delete the local and remote branches -> takes away much of the confusing aspects!

    • CapX | 4/21/17 | 5 min
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      2 months ago

      Wow, pretty bleak! But also short, and seen from a high-level, maybe even superficial, economic perspective. Some more depth with human stories would’ve been helpful. Is it all really that bad?

    • protocol | David Pierce | 10/29/20 | 19 min
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      2 months ago

      I was skeptical when first seeing the title. I’m less so now (but still a bit). This was an interesting read from both a business and human interest perspective. Pretty good marketing for the app too.

      I’ve used Discord only a few times, the last time during a giant (physical) hackathon where hundreds of new people were dropped in this tool at the same time. Didn’t work well. Maybe it’s time to give it another shot in another context.

      "It's supposed to all work in harmony," Vishnevskiy said, "but not focus you on something specific like a Google Meet or a Zoom. Doing it passively is also a core feature.

    • The Guardian | Tom McCarthy | 11/7/20 | 3 min
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      2 months ago

      It seems the Murdoch media has a line that can’t be passed. This title reminded me directly of the final episodes of The Loudest Voice, the series that dramatized the life of late Fox News chief Roger Ailes. There too Ailes breaks with Murdoch because he surpassed that line of human decency and ethics, as Trump continues to do.

    • The Guardian | Alice Gorman and Justin St P Walsh for the Conversation | 11/2/20 | 5 min
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      2 months ago

      Fun brush over the ISS-life. The linked “fight over astro-loos” had me laughing!

    • The New York Review of Books | Tom Scocca | 21 min
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      2 months ago

      the liars of the George W. Bush administration were focused on the truth and said the opposite, in order to conceal it; the Trump administration simply offers an incoherent flood of bullshit, in which the truth may as well not exist at all.

      Extracting the juicy bit:

      an incoherent flood of bullshit

      Yes, that’s tiresome.

    • WIRED | WIRED Staff | 4/21/08 | 33 min
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      2 months ago

      Excellent! This article comes at a time where I'm using Anki to learn Swedish words from books & video. Anki is a spiritual descendant of SuperMemo. Happy to get this bit of context to the tool in Readup, thanks deephdave!

      The article weaves an intriguing mesh of subplots: the inapplicability of psychological research (thinking about Thinking, Fast and Slow), the path to optimal memory, and a glimpse into the eccentric lifestyle of Wozniak.

      When it comes to fact-based knowledge, a big spaced repetition system should deserve more attention in education. As a 14 year old, I learned certain facts about certain plants and animals in biology class for one semester. I got excellent grades at the end term exam. But today I'd recall almost nothing of that. If I had been repeating those facts it for 10 years with spaced repetition, I'm sure it would be long-term memory by now.

      Still, how much do I care about those facts now? Memory is about forgetting: it is about remembering what is worth to remember, and forgetting the rest.

      It is thus about having intellectual goals and priorities. A hard thing to manage. The article points to a rabbit hole in the pursuit of "extreme knowledge":

      But the value of what he remembered depended crucially on what he studied, and what he studied depended on his goals, and the selection of his goals rested upon the efficient acquisition of knowledge, in a regressive function that propelled him relentlessly along the path he had chosen. The guarantee that he would not forget what he learned was both a gift and a demand, requiring him to sacrifice every extraneous thing.

      The article made that seem like a life alienated from others. My take-away: don't take this train to the last station, hop off somewhere in the middle. Use this technique to achieve specific learning goals, but leave some space for the natural evolution (read: depreciation) of memory, feelings and human randomness.

      Extreme knowledge is not something for which he programs a computer but for which his computer is programming him.

    • The New York Times Company | RUSS BUETTNER, Keith Collins, MIKE McINTIRE, GABRIEL J.X. DANCE, SUSANNE CRAIG | 9/27/20 | 3 min
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      2 months ago

      In the end, however, the financial picture for Mr. Trump is fraught.

      This interactive, visualization-based article can’t really be read on Readup, but do check it out on the web! A nice overview of Trump’s finances.

    • Eater | Jenny G. Zhang | 9/15/20 | 3 min
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      3 months ago

      Haha, reminds me of a more dry article about the factories where these are made.

      When it comes to snacking, there are fewer choices finer than a wholly intact sour-cream-and-onion chip,

      I don’t get this. The European Nordics are obsessed with these. With sourcream-and-anything-you-can-imagine. In Belgium the two defaults are salted or paprika flavour, I prefer those any time of the day.

      No matter the flavor of the chips, the taste nearly always smacks overwhelmingly of oil. Eating a small bagful feels like coating one’s mouth in grease, almost like a salve left over to make up for all the vigorous chomping that tooth and tongue and gums had to engage in to facilitate consumption. All that work, and for what?

      Kettle chips do their own thing. I like variation. It’s good to have them all.

    • superorganizers.substack.com | Dan Shipper | 6/26/20 | 12 min
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      4 months ago

      An unlikely analogy with the philosophical debate, but I have to admit that the software abstraction makes sense!

      The paywall is sad though. Never saw such a long article teaser.

    • blog.elementary.io | 7 min
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      4 months ago

      A nice review of anti-broad-tracking analytics software Plausible. I’ve used Piwik/Matomo before, but you always have the concerns of self-hosting & maintenance there. Good to see this SaaS solution making the privacy angle easier.

    • Attention Activist | Jay Vidyarthi | 4 min
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      4 months ago

      Beautiful how this reflection can be applied to life in general. I can relate and need this advice sometimes!

      The very moment any title looks even remotely interesting to you, immediately hit ‘play’.

      Sometimes saying ‘yes’ when I’m thinking ‘no’ opens things up for me.

      That often materializes! Doubts before, but no regrets after. This is an answer to the adage “If it’s not HELL YES, it’s a no”. It seems to come down to balancing the yesses and noes, whatever you think of them :)