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    • Heroku | 6/28/11 | 7 min
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      Heroku making a good case for Heroku: splitting apps and infrastructure while outsourcing the infrastructure probably makes the app more resilient over time.

      Of course, the unspoken dependency here is that if Heroku goes out of business or has other problems, the whole system is suddenly at risk. Migration could be costly. But given the small chances of that and the fact that software doesn’t live forever anyway, it’s an easy trade-off to take.

    • Yle Uutiset | 9 min
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      2 days ago

      "[Learning] English is like an upside down triangle, in that if you learn a little bit, at the bottom, you can make yourself understood," said Sayers. "But to become proficient in professional and academic English, you've got a tonne of stuff to learn."

      Finnish is probably the craziest language in Europe. Both the language, country and people are one of a kind.

      "I think in general gamification is something we should have more of in the education system," says Tenhunen. "For example the portfolio assignments I have been giving let students choose their own paths. So for instance some of my students have been playing video games in French, and they find that really motivating.”

      I kind of agree. MMO chats & UI's are how I got most of my English before school started teaching it. Although this is maybe "language learning from games" rather than "gamification".

      1. Update (8/10/2020):

        Woops, missed a quote on the top there:

        "Finnish is the other way around: to make yourself understood you have to learn an enormous amount of structural grammar, but then once you've got that, to progress on to more professional registers of Finnish is less demanding."

    • Mashable | Jack Morse | 6/22/20 | 3 min
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      4 days ago

      What a burn. With limited evidence to go from though. Still:

      1. Why didn’t Apple have a cycling routing feature yet? I was astounded. 2) Would Google use feedback loops from rider statistics to dynamically adjust their routing algorithm? Or height information?

      Google Maps has improved on the cycling part, but the map detail still lacks. I find Open Street Map based alternatives to work better there.

    • blog.codinghorror.com | 4 min
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      5 days ago

      I remember reading this randomly during my first year undergrad CS. I got a bit sweaty. What if I can’t do the FizzBuzz? Sure enough it worked under 10 mins, with beginner Python knowledge. I remember too needing a second iteration to add in the (var % 3) && (var % 5) condition, which I had forgotten on my first attempt. I still rarely get a program to run after first writing it without any debugging. Programming is an interactive process that takes time! Qualification tests should take that into account.

      I do also feel that (some part of) programming/development has become more abstract and frankly, easier. With all the frameworks and high-level languages available, it’s possible to produce a simple front-end web app without knowing about the existence of the modulo operator. However, that doesn’t excuse job applicants from learning the basics of algorithmic reasoning, data structures & math. They will be needed sooner or later.

    • The New Yorker | Tim Wu | 8/21/15 | 5 min
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      1 week ago

      The "make-work arms race" by mere technological possibility is an interesting insight. I'll try to be on the lookout for this in other contexts. But there's not much you can do against it when you're a lawyer caught in the situation, is there?

      The article also reminds of You’re Not Just Imagining It. Your Job Is Absolute BS. Good to see people thinking about the futility of modern work! :)

    • New Republic | 7/20/20 | 9 min
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      1 week ago

      The question of who is wealthy and who isn’t has political implications that go well beyond electoral politics; it is important for tax policy, among other things.

    • Newsweek België | 7/8/20 | 16 min
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      1 week ago

      Eye-opening. A "new cold war?": this article connected global warming to increased opportunities for oil/gas excavation and traffic in the arctic region. Next, it examined the resulting political tension between mainly the NATO countries and Russia, with related military developments.

      From a climate perspective, it seems the increased human activity in the Arctic region could very well become yet another carbon feedback loop: melting opens up trading routes & materials => more supply & consumption => more emissions => more melting. Not so hopeful.

      From a political and military perspective this is also interesting. The USA recently celebrated the first manned space expedition with an all-American rocket since the Space Shuttle program got discontinued (hooray, no Soyuz-dependence anymore). At the same time, the USA owns 1 ice breaker versus Russia's 40. Reportedly, the USA had to ask for Russia's ice-breaking help in the Antarctic several times already. Political control over the arctic seems a more urgent concern than control over the moon/Mars (but who knows).

      It's a Dutch article, so I guess this will be a lone read (but you could try Chrome's built-in translate feature with Readup?). I want to read this English article on the same topic next: A new Cold War brews as Arctic ice melts - National Geographic. Curious for another perspective.

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      2 weeks ago

      Today I learned: kledingsetiketjes zijn niet altijd duurzaam (en vaak ook fout!). Interessante perspectieven op textielrecyclage.

    • TechCrunch | Josh Constine | 4/19/20 | 8 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Interesting developments for remote social & work life. I do also find myself using voice messages more often since they became more prominent in the UI of messaging applications.

    • Reuters | Raphael Satter | 7/15/20 | 4 min
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      3 weeks ago
    • Zettelkasten Forum | 6 min
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      3 weeks ago

      A well-meaning critique on Zettelkasten and modern information life. I appreciate this perspective.

    • Nick Punt | Nick Punt | 7/3/20 | 18 min
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      3 weeks ago

      Mea culpa: allowing users to systematically admit mistakes. A great idea! I'm surprised by the depth of thought that went into this idea ("But what if ... ?"). Many of my own mental objections were answered in the article. That in itself is an inspiring template for tech feature proposals!

      One thing I'm wondering: if replies are disabled, are the original replies also hidden? If the original poster doesn't want to "follow up", then future readers can construe the reason for the mistake by reading the original replies.

    • In Bed With Tech | Marie Dollé | 6/28/20 | 8 min
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      1 month ago
    • The Ghost Blog | John O'Nolan | 2/28/14 | 4 min
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      1 month ago

      As always, hard & persistent work pays off! Quoting a linked 2014 article from Atwood:

      It is odd to meet developers that tell me they "grew up" with Coding Horror. But I guess that's what happens when you keep at something for long enough, given a modest amount of talent and sufficient resolve. You become recognized. Maybe even influential. Now, after 10 years, I am finally an overnight success.

      I didn't grow up reading Coding Horror, but I've bumped on the blog many times. He's in the search results for sure!

      I can see how this was (and still is) good marketing for Ghost.

    • blog.codinghorror.com | Jeff Atwood | 2/28/14 | 3 min
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      1 month ago

      Motivational!

      I used to tell people who asked me for advice about blogging that if they couldn't think about one interesting thing to write about every week, they weren't trying hard enough. The world is full of so many amazing things and incredible people. As Albert Einstein once said, there are two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.

      I came here through How One Blog Led to $18m of Funding & The World's Largest Online Q&A Community

    • J.K. Rowling | J.K. Rowling | 20 min
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      1 month ago

      Good read. I read the Harper's open letter first, then stumbled upon an angry opinion piece from a trans woman in a Belgian newspaper (De Standaard), an attack on J.K. Rowling who also signed that letter.

      That led me to duckduckgo for "jk rowling ..." which autocompleted to "... transphobic". Search algorithms are also quick to judge! A few link clicks later I luckily ended up on this article. It's harder to dismiss a nuanced article that demonstrates and backs up a position of genuine concern.

    • Foundation for Economic Education | 3/3/15 | 19 min
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      1 month ago

      I read this essay years ago, I think after following a reference in an economics textbook. Ever since, the title "I, Pencil" lingered in my mind and resurfaced occasionally.

      Yesterday was one such occasion. I chuckled when I read the following sentences in "Not So Simple: Notes from a Tech-Free Life by Mark Boyle":

      I have unplugged myself from industrial civilization.

      ... and a bit later

      Writing with a pencil, I can’t get distracted by clickbait or advertising.

      Lol. Gotcha. Boyle claims he disconnected from industrial civilization. And while I appreciate his article, E. Read here wrote a whole essay on how a pencil is the paradigma of industrial civilization!

      Or so I thought. Rereading now, especially with the introduction to this version, I see that I, Pencil is not only a societal or economical essay, but also a unmistakably political. For the free market, against socialism (or communism in the most extreme sense). While I agree with the W. Reeds' comment "Many first-time readers never see the world quite the same again.", I'm not sure if I like all the philosophical and practical implications of his interpretation... The free market is not without issues, as we see especially today.

    • Plough | 13 min
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      1 month ago

      An interesting read. I think many of his concerns about modernity are real. I agree that "our extreme disconnection from the sources of what we consume" is an important cause in some of those concerns. And I respect him for experimenting with a way to personally get back to a more "natural" way of living.

      But, when I read...

      I have unplugged myself from industrial civilization.

      ... and a bit later

      Writing with a pencil, I can’t get distracted by clickbait or advertising.

      I had to think of the great essay "I, Pencil"; where the complexity of the industrial civilization is explained by the example of a pencil. This, and comments here about the medical emergencies etc. put the article in new light. Indeed, as jbuchana says, I do think he romanticizes his life in the article quite a bit, that it is privileged and even hypocritical. But how much does that matter? It's still an inspiring call for more "off-time" and a re-appreciation of simple things.

      PS: it seems almost impossible to fully reject modernity. Finding the "natural state" of man was also a quest in early modernity itself. The French philosopher Rousseau tried to imagine man without civilization, not easy.

    • Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. | Contributors to Wikimedia projects | 8/19/04 | 6 min
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      1 month ago
    • The New Yorker | Haruki Murakami | 2/10/20 | 50 min
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      1 month ago

      My first Murakami. Readup has been pushing it! A fun read throughout, but oh so gripping in the end...

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      1 month ago

      Crazy how difficult it can be to retrieve your data from everyday tools.

      And this was a frank reflection on the personal challenges that arise from severing a digital link to people.

    • screentim.es | 6 min
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      1 month ago

      You’re too sad to lose the gold, so you keep the crap.

      Crap and gold. That's the state of the internet. The key thing to realize is: you may actually lose some gold by dropping means of instant communication/social media. But:

      How golden is the gold, really? Is there another kind of gold waiting for you in a life without WhatsApp? Is the gold worth the crap?

      Great questions.

    • washingtonpost | 9/11/19 | 17 min
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      1 month ago
    • columbiaroad.com | 8 min
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      1 month ago

      No bullshit & a good high-level overview: what is DevOps and how can it help with growth hacking. Identify the bottlenecks! (disclaimer: blog post from a colleague)

    • washingtonpost | 10/4/19 | 15 min
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      1 month ago

      We already had the absurd heat and mitigation engineering in Qatar, now the Washington Post brings us to the once bitterly cold Siberia. Thawing yedoma permafrost perforates the land with puddles and causes floods. Climate refugees abound and mammoths make a fishy comeback. Great reporting on yet another extreme warning case for climate change.

      Yegor Prokopyev, the retired head of Nelemnoye, says climate change is the latest shock to befall the Kolyma River region. There was communism and forced collective farming. Then capitalism and government cutbacks. His grandfather, a peasant, was declared an enemy of the working class and sent to one of this region’s many gulag prison camps. “As soon as you start getting used to something, they’ll come up with something else, and you have to adapt to everything all over again,”

      This brought me back to a scene from Chernobyl (2019). Young soldiers try to evict a stubborn old lady from her house in the radiation zone. She doesn't budge. She overcame wars, revolutions and her children got killed. If the regions most affected by climate change today are already the poorest and least fortunate in history, how can people there bring up the energy for proactively fighting climate change? Or trusting in global cooperation? They live, understandably, in a mode of survival.

    • The New York Times Company | ROBIN POGREBIN | 6/21/20 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      I get this decision. If it is so prominently displayed, it's hard to provide good context. An unfortunate statue for Roosevelt.

      The world does not need statues, relics of another age, that reflect neither the values of the person they intend to honor nor the values of equality and justice,” said Theodore Roosevelt IV, age 77, a great-grandson of the 26th president and a museum trustee.

      In a similar ordeal, the Congo museum in Brussels "reappraised" a whole museum including offensive exhibits with more context. It took 3 years of renovation: What Britain should learn from Belgium: history can be reappraised.

    • SAPIENS | Karen L. Kramer | 6/9/20 | 9 min
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      1 month ago

      Interesting! I love the scientific approach of counting hours-on-task and livelihood contributions by the children. But I'm not sure if the article content fully answers the question asked by the title, or at least, it narrows it down a little to "What made humans able to reproduce in higher quantities than other great apes?"

      Observations in the article from some hundreds of people in modern hunter-gatherer societies can maybe explain the dynamics of population growth in similar societies in the past. It might even explain population growth in large developing (agricultural?) societies today.

      However, in modern western(ized) societies, depending on help from children for nursing, food procurement is more likely to be seen as child labour, bad parenting and a system failure.

      A little bit of Wikipedia shows that the increase in population in western(ized) countries since the 19th century is mostly caused by a decrease in mortality; not by an increase in fertility. This article doesn't talk about that at all.

      Fathers and grandparents certainly play important roles in supporting their families.

      Ahah! This other AOTD zoomed in on the father aspect: The marvel of the human dad, it made the exact same point about weaning differences in humans vs non-human great apes, and some others. Love how Readup brings it all together!

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 6/15/20 | 8 min
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      1 month ago

      I like the features and the attitude. But I wonder if the screening box will actually reduce email checking load. The impossible problem with screening is that some people might get an important email from an unknown sender at any point in time. Checking the screening box "At your leisure" might not cut it, so they check it regularly. And then the screening box is just another inbox.

    • ecmag.com | 3 min
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      1 month ago

      Good supplementary reading for this one.

    • washingtonpost | 12/5/19 | 20 min
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      1 month ago

      Depressing, but interesting. The link between power lines and wildfires wasn't obvious, here's a helpful explainer

      He turned to his wife, Linda, and assured her that all would be fine when he turned on the sprinklers to wet the place down.

      But when he flipped the switch, nothing happened. The power had been cut by an equipment failure.

      When natural hell breaks loose, you can't really depend on man-made systems.

    • The Babbel Magazine | Lesson Nine GmbH, Babbel.com | 8 min
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      1 month ago

      Petition to replace "Best Ever" and "All time" in Readup with GOAT. It would be a good sister to AOTD. Just kiddin. Fun to read something more theoretical on the "black accent"!

      AAVE feels like your mother’s bosom pressing up against the back of your head as she’s braiding.

    • The Spectator | Anthony Browne | 3 min
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      1 month ago

      the Congo is the only country in the world that has ever thought Belgium is a superpower.

      I visited this museum with my school as a child (age < 12 ), at least once. I don't think my teacher had given any context about the colonial brutalities, we just marveled at the "African art".

      Colonialism is part of Belgium’s history, and now there is somewhere Belgians can go to learn about it, warts and all. We should not try to erase our histories, which are part of what we are, but equally we shouldn’t flinch from reappraising them.

      I wish the article was longer and gave more details on what actually changed in the museum, and especially how that happened. I remember listening to a podcast during the renovation period that reported on the involvement of Congolese communities in the reappraisal. There was no consensus there. Some even demanded the return of stolen art.

    • The Guardian | Richard Orange | 2/25/17 | 8 min
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      1 month ago

      Note: article from 2017. It reports on Rinkeby, a problematic suburb in Stockholm where riots happened after an anti-immigration statement from Trump. He had said “You look at what’s happening last night in Sweden”, while nothing had happened.

      Some people launched this fact-based log site in response: https://lastnight.in/Sweden/. Unfortunately, the site shows that rarely a few days pass without a bombing/shooting/... incident.

      This articles proves useful in my current housing hunt.

      "But it is undoubtedly true that delinquency is a problem, particularly at night. ", "it was only the second shooting in Rinkeby in five years", "blames this outlaw mentality on segregation", "90% of people living here either being born abroad or having parents who were", "Sweden has the most ethnically segregated cities of all the groups of countries in the OECD".

      I like late night runs, so I'll avoid this area :(

      “The thing that they have in the US is starting to come to Europe now, that whole gangster thing, with the music and everything.”

      Well US friends, here you have a vague US stereotype! Not sure if the author should've included this quote without further motivation or comparison data.

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      1 month ago

      A little bit of Google propaganda with two take-aways:

      1. Do virtual meetings while walking outside. Stay active. I still find it crazy that this is possible, only did it a few times. But I like it.
      2. Book meetings on 25 or 50 min slots so there is always a 5 or 10 minute break. This reduces stress.
    • aaronzlewis.com | Aaron Z. Lewis | 22 min
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      2 months ago

      This article offers a nice overview of some internet problems & trendspots solutions with cool references.

      About the "meta" approach to fix information problems: this reminded me of Kialo, a debating platform that aims to show both sides of a debate (think vaccines, everyone should be vegan, god exists) in ever-deeper detail.

      I never really used it, but opened it again now. It's a structured rabbit hole, but still a rabbit hole. I feel that's a problem with these meta approaches: how can you make sense of a mass of information or networks? Thoughtfully disconfirming and checking your beliefs takes so much more energy than scrolling a filter bubble...

    • washingtonpost | 10/16/19 | 21 min
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      2 months ago

      Wow. I'm sweltering from the heat of this article.

      Qatar emits a lot of greenhouse gases. About 60 percent of the country’s electricity is used for cooling. By contrast, air conditioning accounts for barely 15 percent of U.S. electricity demand and less than 10 percent of China’s or India’s.

      While climate change inflicts suffering in the world’s poorest places from Somalia to Syria, from Guatemala to Bangladesh, in rich places such as the United States, Europe and Qatar global warming poses an engineering problem, not an existential one.

      Boom.

      Also:

      “With the coming global environmental collapse, to live completely indoors is like, the only way we’ll be able to survive."

      Yes sir, that was October 16 last year. Hopefully corona will fade out (or blend in) in the next few years. The same can't be said for climate change.

      Personnel conducting patrols or aircraft maintenance work for 20 minutes, then rest for 40 minutes and drink two bottles of water an hour.

      I guess this way of life is coming to most cities worldwide, for varying lengths of (summer) time, in the next 100 years. Let's flatten that climate curve as much as possible.

      No wonder this series won a Pulitzer. Need to read 'm all!

      1. Update (6/12/2020):

        Pro-tip: do open the article in a different tab too to see the full-res images, graphs & interactive visualization. There's also a ℉ <=> ℃ switch!

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 6/5/20 | 4 min
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      2 months ago

      Yes! Gogogo Bill, Jeff, and angel investors! The present and future need you. No further comment.

      We’re turning the entire incentive structure upside down. Soon, you’ll be able to get paid a meaningful amount per read. Think: nickels, dimes, even quarters, depending on length and quality, instead of the current nightmare where you get a fraction of a fraction of a penny per click.

      Except: this is such a crucial part of the story. With "intention, focus and calm" you'll overcome the hurdles!

    • The Correspondent | Michiel de Hoog | 3/9/20 | 14 min
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      2 months ago

      Great article. De Hoog provides a good set of arguments on why aiming more broadly in developing skills makes sense, most of the time. That quitting and trying out things can be even better than blind grit and persistence. And of course, the article rehashes the start-up maxim that "failure is an opportunity to learn".

      The examples are compelling, the accompanying series of images is fascinating as well (in their own regard). The ending paragraph also nicely summarises a side-message of this article:

      And now: not a pithy one-liner, just some life advice

      Which relates to a few earlier sentences in which the author displayed his problems with general truths.

      However, Epstein’s strong point is that he never loses sight of the ifs and buts in his argument.

      One-liners are not (always :) ) general truths. The feeling of knowing it all can be delusional. Ifs and buts are everywhere, they make a case for more (intellectual) openness.

      1. Update (6/8/2020):

        Also happy to see that the innovative Dutch journalistic enterprise De Correspondent launched an English-language variant. I had no idea. Brace yourselves, Readup! Correspondent Rutger Bregman already appeared in the AOTDs.

    • jonleighton.name | 13 min
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      2 months ago

      Despite the warning for heavy reading matter, I found this a refreshing climate read.

      It seems like a plea for a combined approach. On one hand, the system has failed. Take matters into your own hands, start a permaculture garden, go pluck mushrooms in the forest, gradually detach from "the system" and feel at peace with yourself. On the other hand, the system is all we have. Keep putting pressure on politics & companies by voting, protesting and circulating information.

      I like how he ends with the desire to reconnect to (local) nature as a software developer. It sounds quite hard to pull off; two different worlds. Would love to learn about people who did. For now, I just think of these guys and their sailboat.

    • chicagotribune.com | Allison Stewart | 4/4/18 | 9 min
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      2 months ago

      [...] but metal fans tend to strongly self-identify as metal fans. They listen to whole albums, [...]

      Haha, yes. Albums from start to finish, that's usually my approach to music. Sad that this is seen as a unique property of metal fans. Listening to whole albums - if they're good - is like reading a whole story!