1. Join Readup to read with thorgalle.

    thorgalle
    8 followers
    • The Guardian | Afua Hirsch | 5/21/20 | 4 min
      17 reads6 comments
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      The Guardian
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      thorgalle4 days ago
    • freeCodeCamp.org News | Romain Aubert | 1/9/17 | 6 min
      25 reads8 comments
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      freeCodeCamp.org News
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      thorgalle5 days ago
    • In Bed With Tech | Marie Dollé | 5/24/20 | 8 min
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      In Bed With Tech
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      thorgalle6 days ago

      Interesting perspectives, Marie. Good to see many new initiatives to tighten connections on the social internet (including Readup!).

      I like the concept of digital gardens, and yes, tools like Notion make it more accessible to create them. It was harder with older blogging platforms, or without web development knowledge.

      It reminds me of Nikita Voloboev, who is posting "everything he knows" online, using git, GitBooks and GitHub. It's fascinating to literally see him add items every waking hour. Another intriguing one is the wiki of Devine Lu Linvega (but the website styles seems to be broken now).

      I'm sceptical about the co-browsing. Do sales agents really take control over your computer? Or just that website? Do they wait until you put items in your shopping basket? Sounds weird to me, but it might help some.

    • The New York Times Company | Jonathan Safran Foer | 5/21/20 | 8 min
      35 reads39 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      thorgalle6 days ago

      Wow, what a Readup test! Many strong and problematic points in the article, and a real discussion here.

      In general I think it's good that we're collectively cooking more, whether plant-based or not. This indeed makes us reflect on food more.

      I’ve been eating primarily vegan for about 5 years. It started from the unconventional reason that veggie food was easier to cook & cheaper as a student, then I had this period where I got alarmed over factory farming from a sustainability & ethical perspective (eg. by watching Cowspiracy and reading Peter Singer's Animal Liberation). Now it's more a habit than anything else.

      So I'm inclined by my confirmation bias to agree with most of what the article is recommending. But as pointed out here, the article also makes plain weird statements, including:

      The ultimate dream of the animal-agriculture industrial complex is for “farms” to be fully automated. Transitioning toward plant-based foods and sustainable farming practices would create many more jobs than it would end.

      Heh? Why would plant-based food plants not aim to be automated? The unique problem with automation in animal factory farms is not a loss of jobs. It's that it's an unscrupulous killing machine with as little regard for animal & worker welfare as possible, all for the sake of cold capitalistic efficiency.

      As Jeff & Alexa say I think, we should focus on dealing with the factory farming issue rather than taking extreme positions on meat consumption as a whole. I agree, but it's not trivial to switch to more sustainable meat practices. At the same time, I'm all for positive reinforcement of the veggie/vegan movement and related products. Meat is still dominating the scene, that should change.

    • The Verge | Tom Warren | 5/19/20 | 8 min
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      Indeed not coming from nowhere! Visual Studio Code has been a success given the widespread adoption by developers and plugin makers. Fluid components seem a powerful and worthwhile concept as well.

      It reminds me of the "dynamic emails" Google is sending with up-to-date overviews of Google Doc comments at the moment you open the mail. It would be good to open up that tech.

      At the same time, people are solving this problem already by sharing links to some tool with realtime collaboration, instead of sending static documents. So the difference is not huge, the integration will just be better.

      Or am I wrong? This was an interesting bit:

      ‘What if we built every experience on top of a data structure that was inherently distributed?’

      I'm wondering whether they're talking about Conflict-free replicated data types. In that case, will these components offer local-first distributed data? Or will they be centralized, like most collaborative services now?

    • The New Yorker | Hua Hsu | 5/11/20 | 14 min
      21 reads8 comments
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      The New Yorker
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      Weird article, but not bad. How mysterious can things get?

      Plants make their own food, converting the world around them into nutrients. Animals must find their food. But fungi essentially acquire theirs by secreting digestive enzymes into their environment, and absorbing whatever is nearby: a rotten apple, an old tree trunk, an animal carcass

      You know those moments when something causes you to think of the world and yourself seemingly from a distance? (no psilocybin involved) Reading this I was thinking of a red fox brushing through lush bushes in evening sunlight, sniffing around a mushroom in pursuit of some game. We also must find our food.

    • Mashable | Henry P. Twolingos (as transcribed by Shelby Slauer) | 11/23/17 | 2 min
      3 reads3 comments
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      Why can't you people just finish something you started?

      Henry P. Twolingos lives the Readup mindset.

    • WIRED UK | Sirin Kale | 20 min
      52 reads13 comments
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      WIRED UK
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      Nice read!

      In real life, Vestil is less obnoxious, albeit grandiose and prone to speaking in a mixture of pop psychology, corporate jargon and quasi-Buddhist philosophy.

      LOL. Sounds like he's about to start writing a stereotypical self-help book.

      “I see money as a tool, and making more money is like putting more tools in a big garage, and you don’t even use the tools to create anything. It’s just meaningless.”

      Easier to say after having the money, but a useful analogy. I guess you gotta have the right amount of money to get the right tools.

      After university, he criss-crossed Europe and the US by bicycle, earning money doing freelance web design. By the time he arrived in Bali in May 2016, he was broke.

      This was a good cautionary tale. I'm vaguely dreaming of doing this (not dropshipping! the bike stuff) in a more sustainable and rewarding way. @bill, you running Readup from your RV is inspiring.

    • The New Yorker | Elif Batuman | 4/23/18 | 52 min
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      thorgalle2 weeks ago

      Strange and shocking at fundaments. Like Ericwhitney808 here I also appreciated the historical zoom-outs between the captivating rent-a-something stories. Of those, maybe the most powerful for me were the writer’s personal reflections, and her final tentative change of mind.

      But "unconditional love with payment"? That's an oxymoron. I get the point, a paid service is performed without expectation of something in return. Except money, which makes it conditional. That actually brings us back to the origins of money: it's a tool of trust that enables exchange beyond the material quid pro quo. But it doesn't buy love? (What is love?)

      In any case, this article definitely scraps some entries from my mental list "things money can't buy".

    • alexdanco.com | 11/10/15 | 4 min
      85 reads14 comments
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      alexdanco.com
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      thorgalle2 weeks ago

      Not really agreeing with this as a general mindset. It might be helpful to focus on "the most important thing" in some cases, but often you need a conjunction of 2 or more good elements for a successful outcome.

      Example: A) Your tech product works technically but the UX is horrible. Nobody understands it, nobody uses it. -> Fix the UX B) Your tech product is full of bugs, but the UI looks neat and understandable. People give up on it because it doesn't work. -> Fix the bugs C) You have bugs AND a bad UX. What is the most important thing now? I'd argue, first fix the bugs, then fix the UX.

      So adding 1 word to the question: "What's the next most important thing?" There will often be many equally important things you can do, and they are not "implementation details". What to do next is a decision weighted by importance, however you fill that in.

      1. Update (5/13/2020):

        *mistake: it's hard to define "equally important" if you don't measure importance in numbers. And making a decision on what to do next hopefully involves some kind of value judgment that already makes 1 thing more important than another.

        But 2 things can be important at the same time, right? Care for kid A, and care for kid B.

    • The Guardian | Rutger Bregman | 5/9/20 | 14 min
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      thorgalle2 weeks ago

      What a story! I love how it starts from a question and develops into an unbelievable adventure (both for the author and the boys).

      I'd have liked to see more details on life on the island, but that was not the point of the article.

      I got lured in to read this after spotting the author name (and title). I remember Bregman from him cutting to the chase at the rich on the World Economic Forum (YouTube, it's gold).

      This is definitely a good teaser for his book too. It's been long ago that I was excited to read a Dutch original book (my first language).

    • HuffPost Highline | Caroline Bologna | 5/7/20 | 3 min
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      thorgalle3 weeks ago

      The article did give an answer to something I was wondering about.

    • thorgalle3 weeks ago

      This was an experiment, trying to use the "thread reader app" that condenses twitter threads into "blog articles".

      Readup support for threadreaderapp.com articles isn't really there yet. And threadreaderapp could be doing more than condensing, but hey, how epic would it be?

      Cleanly reading, sharing & discussing whole Twitter threads as small blog posts on Readup... A painful writing style to read I guess (every line is a punchline with @mentions). But in a way, it's also social media transcendence.

    • Mashable | Tim Marcin | 5/3/20 | 6 min
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      thorgalle3 weeks ago

      If we can bottle the way people are reaching out to each other and trying to connect, and drink from this even after the crisis is over, I do think that would be a genuine silver lining amidst all of the horror and grief.

      Have you been unexpectedly reconnecting with people from your past? I can count the instances on one hand, but yes, they were worth repeating! A good reminder of what counts.

    • Aeon | Anna Machin | 1/17/19 | 18 min
      21 reads13 comments
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      Aeon
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      thorgalle3 weeks ago

      Where a child was brought up by two fathers, rather than a father and a mother, the plasticity of the human brain had ensured that, in the primary caretaking dad, both areas – mum’s and dad’s – showed high levels of activity so that his child still benefited from a fully rounded developmental environment.

      Interesting article! The whole thing made me think about "nature vs nurture", but this line explicitly referenced it. It seems the motherly female behavior can be somewhat learned as a male. And I guess it goes the other way around as well. To this we can ask the question: what is a father then? Or mother? Just a set of learnable behaviors, excluding some biological differences?

    • The Guardian | Rebecca Solnit | 4/7/20 | 20 min
      14 reads9 comments
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      thorgalle3 weeks ago

      Within this living soup are the imaginal cells that will catalyse its transformation into winged maturity. May the best among us, the most visionary, the most inclusive, be the imaginal cells – for now we are in the soup.

      These analogies! Makes me hopeful, and makes me want to read her book about disasters.

    • The New Yorker | Anthony Gottlieb | 4/27/20 | 16 min
      20 reads7 comments
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      The New Yorker
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      “It is pleasanter to be thrilled than to be depressed, and not merely pleasanter but better for all one’s activities.”

    • The Cut | Evie Ebert | 4/22/20 | 5 min
      44 reads12 comments
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      The Cut
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      It's so double, social media. Whatever you put out there might either help and inspire, or cause resentment. And not because you put it out there, but because the viewer didn't necessarily want to see it.

      As an antidote, I indulge in a soothing practice of something approaching anti-gratitude.

      Under a stay-at-home order until further notice, it feels like we’re living the same day over and over.

    • The New Yorker | Bernard Avishai | 4/21/20 | 11 min
      3 reads2 comments
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      For Taleb, an antifragile country would encourage the distribution of power among smaller, more local, experimental, and self-sufficient entities—in short, build a system that could survive random stresses, rather than break under any particular one.

      Many interesting suggestions and "shoulds" in this article, but not so much backup (why?, how?). It seems more like an advertisement for Taleb's books.

      update: oh fun, I quoted the same passage as deephdave

    • Organizer Sandbox | Bill Loundy | 4/25/20 | 9 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Interesting question, interesting hypotheses. I like 1 & 2.

      I keep getting back to this quote from My Instagram. Again in line with your hypothesis 2.

      A voyeur knows what kind of viewer he is, but looking at Instagram, you are not always a voyeur. Neither are you always a witness, nor any other single kind of watcher. Each post interpellates you differently. Your implied identity slips with each stroke of the thumb.

      3 is a bit harder to generalize, but holds some truth, I guess.

      “Let’s move this over to the messages,” isn’t really a thing.

      You could just do it!

    • Organizer Sandbox | Bill Loundy | 4/24/20 | 6 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I don’t have to write the story. It will write itself.

      Interesting perspective: how social media puts your story partly in the hands of the platform, and of other people.

      But I don't think you're out of control entirely.

    • blog.readup.com | 5/24/19 | 8 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I'm happy I scanned some older Readup blog articles a few days ago, remembered this one and read it today after being reminded of it.

      This is the kind of motivational writing that I need to see regularly in order to overcome a fear of sharing and being judged. A fear of displeasing people and wasting their time. I've been experiencing this often, and in various ways.

      On Instagram I never got quite comfortable sharing pictures of myself: what purpose would it serve? Ego-boosting while by counting the likes I received? That felt unhealthy. At the same time I somewhat enjoyed seeing friends' adventures and stories. Yet it's hard to remove the thoughts of judgement and self-censorship with the way "loves" and views are so central on this platform.

      On Twitter I wanted to communicate more about various interests. But I felt frustrated at the impossibility of catering to those interests separately. Why are people following me? Because they're real-life friends? Or because I shared something tech-related and they want more of that? Anything I Tweet out of a spontaneous desire to share could be interesting to few, and crap to others. How can a technical observation about message passing mechanisms in web extensions ever interest a friend studying psychology? It would just pollute her feed.

      I feel that way because I'm also frustrated with Twitter from the feed consumer side. I follow a soup of people with a soup of interests. The feed is always a slot machine of interesting bits mixed up with marketing talk and random stuff. To write this, and to back up this feeling, I'm now looking at my Twitter feed. I see that Minecraft developer Notch, who sometimes tweets funny things, and who I happen to "follow", retweeted a random guy saying: "I graduate in two weeks". Awesome. I couldn't care more. And this randomness is thrown into my face without prior selection or deliberate choice of content. Nauseating.

      Readup is refreshing. First, the plate of articles that Readup presents to me every day is delightfully limited. There's just one article of the day. A "feed" of competing articles follows, but often I've already read 3 of those because they change slowly. Day by day. Visit Twitter again within 10 minutes and there are hundreds of new pieces of information craving my attention. In Readup, my followee's activity is not shoved into my face. Clicking the friend or notification feed is an intentional act of discovery. And there's less variety in the stuff to be found. I can scan some article titles and decide what I'm interested in. When I'm done reading something, it's easy to leave Readup and do something else.

      But wait. Let me correct that. One major exception is that long articles often trigger long thought. And long thought wants to escape and be discussed in a comment.

      How long should a Readup comment be? What should it comment on? How long should you take to write it, and in other words, how much thought should be put in it?

      Readup comments have the nice property that they are bound together by the Opening Post, the article. You know at least a direction of what to expect. But that doesn't make them predictable. They could be short exclamations like "Nice article!". They can explore tangential topics and provide background, or they can criticize and discuss statements. And often, they trigger gulps of personal reminiscence of various shapes and sizes. Indulge at your own discretion.

      While I originally wanted to concisely comment on some sections of this article, I spontaneously went off on a rant about sharing the self on social media. It took almost two hours, and I had not planned to spend that much time.

      This is also the second time a comment almost became a blog article recently. Being a CS graduate student, I felt compelled to say something about "Why do so few people major in computer science?" a few days ago. But when I started writing that comment, it became a story of my personal doubts and reflections when picking my direction of studies. It was a few paragraphs long.

      Surely, that is too long for a Readup comment. I didn't post it.

    • Organizer Sandbox | Bill Loundy | 4/23/20 | 9 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Bill, I’m loving this series. Thanks for keeping up the honesty. These spelled out thoughts and feelings document everything that's right, wrong and confusing with social media from a really unique perspective.

      Keep going.

      (I find it completely impossible to keep track of time when I’m on Twitter. I’ll write more about that later. I urgently need a way to figure out how to set limits

      Relatable. These won't fly on iPad, but a few suggestions for desktop: 1. Take away like/retweet/follow numbers, 2. That Nudge plugin. Curious to see what tools you will try & how they will work out.

    • Organizer Sandbox | Bill Loundy | 4/21/20 | 6 min
      46 reads28 comments
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Pretty cool what you can free-write in 30 min, no, 1h!

      When I got back to my apartment, I deleted my Twitter account.

      That was perfect with the paragraphs leading on to it 😂

      WHY: I want to remember how this feels. And I think that some others might be interested in this journey — especially if I keep it honest and interesting.

      YES. Especially interested in the habits you will develop (or not). These little red badges tend to get into your mind when used regularly. You crave them.

      Plus, last night, I got a rejection email from Y Combinator.

      Damn. Onwards. This will work out.

    • gizmodo.com | Harrison Weber | 9/17/18 | 3 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I had never heard of Path, I was barely on Facebook in 2010. What would a friend-limited network have to offer today in a world filled with WhatsApp family & friend groups? Not sure.

    • The Guardian | Laura Laker | 4/21/20 | 3 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      It's good to be proactive and accept that things won't go to normal soon. But I was missing a really proactive perspective here.

      It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take a fresh look at your streets and make sure that they are set to achieve the outcomes that we want to achieve: not just moving cars as fast as possible from point A to point B, but making it possible for everyone to get around safely.

      Before, we were planning for 2030; now the new phase, we are calling it 2020. Instead of thinking about the future, we have to think about the present.”

      Yes, today is about safety. And yes, this could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take a fresh look at streets. So why not also look at 2030, and maybe even 2040/50/.... ? The city where I'm from has a roadmap to become climate neutral by 2030 (Leuven 2030). I'm wondering if the current situation gives leeway to implement some measures faster than originally planned. Definitely wouldn't hurt...

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 4/20/20 | 2 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      My last month was also erratic. But it was still the biggest article-reading month so far. I think I had a 7+ day streak at some point. So if anything, corona boosted my reading!

      I also appreciated the ocean article yesterday. At some point I was thinking, "why am I reading this at 11pm rather than doing something enjoyable?", but the question was short-lived. It was a great article. And I'm happy you saved it from rollingstone.com where it was kept hostage by horrendous ads (I accidentally didn't have an ad blocker on. Really, how could one read this???)

      I especially liked your observation that we should "flatten the climate curve". That's EXACTLY it, we can start using the vocabulary we are learning in the current crisis to talk about the bigger crisis.

      "...but I think they can equally be divided into shallow and deep, and the pursuit of what is supposed to be happiness is often a flight from depth, from one’s own interior life and the suffering around us – and not being happy is often framed as a failure."

      She lost me there. I guess I should read the article.

    • billloundy.substack.com | Bill Loundy | 4/19/20 | 12 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I offered my brain to these words, I read a heartfelt story that nourished my day and I sent some kilobytes to the Readup servers. It's good to have this all.

    • Rolling Stone | Jeff Goodell | 4/2/20 | 27 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago
    • themargins.substack.com | Margins | 10 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Building businesses that your users come to rely on, fostering a community, and then pulling the rug under them when the money dries out is not putting customers first.

      Where things go haywire is “growth capital,” where companies raise money not to validate their ideas in the marketplace, but simply “grow,” regardless of the business itself.


      Allowing people to download their data from your service, which 99.9% of your users won’t bother, and of that 0.01 % that do can’t do anything with, is not putting your customers first. That is you making your conscience feel better.

      Oops. I'm that 0.01%. For my part, companies should be able to apply for a subsidy program to develop these kinds of features. It's not necessarily in their direct interest, but IMHO it is in the interest of users and therefore society.

      Without the lens of wanting to make money, everything looks the same. You can’t tell whether you should do this, or that, if you don’t have a scale to judge things by.

      Hmm, not sure if money should be the only scale for that. From a business perspective he makes a valid point. But what about the scale of "this work gives me satisfaction in life" ?. If the argument is to first make money, only then explore what you like, how much time do you need to sacrifice for that?

      1. Update (4/17/2020):

        I also like his "What I’m Reading" section in the end. I now saved an article about a breathtaking Norwegian bicycle trail 👍

    • WIRED | Sandra Upson | 4/15/20 | 39 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Still, all the money in the world can't answer the question of who, really, is living in that house.

      Poignant indeed. A stark reminder of the ill fortune that can befall any well-fortuned person.

      1 in 5,000 is rare but not negligible. I like how the author told a story that is not just about Lee.

    • Letters of Note | 1/30/12 | 4 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Wow, gripping. This letter turns from familiar reminiscence to pure acid.

      And what a time to read it: I started reading A People's History of the United States yesterday. Now I'm at the initial chapters on slavery. Good context here.

      Also: from the the title I was expecting to read something about a martial artist student whose aged master died of corona. I'm happy it wasn't. Readup has a knack of balancing the old & gold with the current :) Thanks Jeff!

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      Strange but interesting news report. If COBOL is the 40-year old bottleneck in meeting current tech demands, how would the systems look like where these programs run on? I thought seeing Windows XP somewhere was bad. Curious what other time bombs exist like this...

    • GQ | Clay Skipper | 3/31/20 | 19 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Enriching. Many great sections. But some of the comparisons and analogies were weird.

      So to me it's not good or bad—but more about intentional or casual. If you're intentional with technology, you know what you're trying to do, you know what you care about, and you're putting tools to use to help that

      I love this notion of "intentional" vs "casual". "intentional" we hear a lot, but I hadn't heard of a word for the flip side. Casual it is.

      If you're in a particularly geeky mood, you can think about life as a combinatorial optimization process.

      🤓 ✅ I like his CS approach to explaining human problems.

      It's just engineer stuff: How inefficient is this that everyone says good or congrats? Let's have a like button for that, so the comments that are there can be more substantive

      Was this really the original Facebook mindset? Relevant for the future of Readup silent posts/ratings/like mechanisms?

    • The Atlantic | Olga Khazan | 3/16/20 | 8 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago
    • Five Books | Five Books | 17 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      After finishing The World of Yesterday, a book on the history of Europe around the turn of the 20th century, I got interested to read something about the general history of the USA.

      I came to this interview looking for answers. The recommendations by the interviewee are interesting, but all have a specific focus. No general overviews.

      Feel free to recommend me something! I considered A People's History of the United States, but would like to start with something slightly shorter and less negatively biased (according to reviews).

    • UX Planet | Ben Shih | 3/15/20 | 5 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      A little read with pictures on "user experience" in the daily life of a Swedish student. Relatable. The door example is poignant.

    • Teen Vogue | Jamie Margolin | 3/18/20 | 3 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Ahh. To the point and angry. Full-on Greta-style.

      I'm on board with the core idea: drastic change is possible! Let's make it happen for climate mitigation too! Because our decade-long efforts are going nowhere.

      I've been trying to write the same article in slightly different tones... it's not an easy comparison.

      Pandemic response is simply trying to mitigate a disaster, while urgent climate response is not only mitigating disaster, but actively creating a better world.

      I don't agree completely. As seen in many reads here, it's clear that the current situation is not just mitigation. That was the original response. Now we see that we're in a historical crisis that will have lasting effects beyond a fix of the biological problem. It's a massive and disruptive experiment of remote work and social behavior, to name just two effects. Hopefully we can learn from the experiment and make a better world on many fronts - taking into account climate change.

      The main reason for the current drastic response is grounded fear. It was Italy, it's the death counts, survivor stories, collapsing economy. It's actual, visible, tangible evidence of disaster in a time-scale that the privileged of societies globallly can feel. It's around us now. This experience is REAL. Climate change still doesn't feel real for many, understandably.

    • James Clear | 10/23/14 | 5 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      A nice short read, thanks deephdave!

      For the Finns, there was no question whether some of them would die. The question was whether any of them would survive.

      The author cracked a very Finnish-sounding joke here.

      I studied in Aalto University in Helsinki last year. Some related trivia I picked up there:

      • Helsinki harbors an icebreaker called Sisu. Icebreakers were important in the history of Finland because they opened up trade in wintertime. If you ever are in Helsinki, I recommend going to the public Sompasauna, bathing in the sea and enjoying the view of the icebreakers with Helsinki's landmarks in the background. Travel tips on Readup.
      • There was the Winter War legend Simo Häyhä, dubbed "The White Death", a sniper who was reported to have killed ~500 invading Russians.
    • The New Yorker | Italo Calvino | 2/15/09 | 23 min
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      The New Yorker
      5 reads
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      thorgalle1 month ago