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    thorgalle
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    • The Atlantic | Kaitlyn Tiffany | 3/17/20 | 7 min
      10 reads8 comments
      9.1
      The Atlantic
      10 reads
      9.1
      thorgalle1 day ago

      Interesting. Containment also resurrected my Instagram from a half-year death, but there's no faces on there now. This article makes me reconsider!

    • The New Yorker | Malcolm Gladwell | 9/21/97 | 51 min
      15 reads9 comments
      9.5
      The New Yorker
      15 reads
      9.5
      thorgalle1 day ago

      This started off slow but developed into an amazing read. It makes you feel like you learned something deeper about viruses.

      I was wondering, since this exhuming was supposed to happen in 1998, did Kirsty learn anything new about the Spanish flu?

      Wikipedia answers:

      After several more years of preparation, which involved garnering various permissions to perform the exhumations, the ground survey began in 1998. However, the samples were not viable, as the bodies were not in the permafrost, and the expedition ultimately proved a disappointment.[8]

      At least it brought us this article.

      1. Update (3/27/2020):

        For laughs: when I started reading this I Ctrl+Ffed "corona". No hits. How can you write an article about viruses today without mentioning corona?

        I read it fully without noticing that this was written in 1997. Only the comments here made me wiser.

    • The New York Times Company | Jason Mark | 12/10/14 | 4 min
      2 reads2 comments
      8.0
      The New York Times Company
      2 reads
      8.0
      thorgalle3 days ago

      I'm asking questions and the internet gives answers. Or at least a reference to another movie from the director of Parasite. A fun read on "cli-fi" (climate-fiction) movies.

    • Slate | Henry Grabar | 3/12/20 | 6 min
      3 reads2 comments
      7.0
      Slate
      3 reads
      7.0
      thorgalle4 days ago

      If there is any sign of our future in Italy, where everything but groceries and pharmacies has been shut down, a once-in-a-lifetime break with normalcy is ahead of us.

      I find this "once-in-a-lifetime" notion of the crisis very fascinating. It's true in many regards. And I really hope it will hold true for us, our children and further descendants.

      I read this because I want to write something titled "Corona will save the planet" (or less catchy: "COVID-19 might help us build actionable empathy for the plight of our descendants during severe and irreversible climate crises").

    • MIT Technology Review | Gideon Lichfield | 3/17/20 | 8 min
      46 reads15 comments
      9.3
      MIT Technology Review
      46 reads
      9.3
      thorgalle5 days ago
    • BRIGHT Magazine | Courtney Martin | 1/11/16 | 10 min
      23 reads8 comments
      9.5
      BRIGHT Magazine
      23 reads
      9.5
      thorgalle6 days ago
    • Organizer Sandbox | Mikael Cho | 7/15/13 | 8 min
      21 reads13 comments
      8.9
      Organizer Sandbox
      21 reads
      8.9
      thorgalle1 week ago

      I love this article, in the sense that it confirms, backs up & spells out some disorganised thoughts I had for years.

      The emotional connection to learning was new for me though, and it reminds me of this passage from an essay, My Instagram:

      A voyeur knows what kind of viewer he is, but looking at Instagram, you are not always a voyeur. Neither are you always a witness, nor any other single kind of watcher. Each post interpellates you differently. Your implied identity slips with each stroke of the thumb.

      It's really why I'm avoiding social media feeds right now.

      Also, a great testament to Readup :)

    • superorganizers.substack.com | Dan Shipper | 15 min
      18 reads7 comments
      9.0
      superorganizers.substack.com
      18 reads
      9.0
      thorgalle1 week ago

      Fascinating. I especially appreciate how he succeeded in making a complex knowledge system using just text files & auxiliary scripts! Only he can navigate it I guess.

      The English language learning system made me smile too. Tackling the exact same problem has been my largest hobby project ever. I've also hacked a way to learn dictionary lookups from a Kindle (not highlights) with translations & context in vocabulary.com.

    • superorganizers.substack.com | Dan Shipper | 15 min
      18 reads7 comments
      9.0
      superorganizers.substack.com
      18 reads
      9.0
      thorgalle1 week ago
    • The Guardian | William Hanage | 3/15/20 | 5 min
      18 reads6 comments
      9.3
      The Guardian
      18 reads
      9.3
      thorgalle1 week ago

      Interesting discussion of the second wave & herd immunity problem, but I find that this article mostly repeats what has already circulated so much in the mainstream media. Maybe not a bad thing.

    • The Atlantic | Derek Thompson | 1/10/20 | 5 min
      2 reads2 comments
      9.0
      The Atlantic
      2 reads
      9.0
      thorgalle1 week ago

      Thompson makes a fascinating point: in a country like the US, meat consumption will only decrease due to an increase in fake meats.

      But I don't agree with the way animal/eco activism is painted as ineffective. It is this growing movement that kickstarted the market for fake meats in the first place.

    • Marker | Courtney Rubin | 2/24/20 | 37 min
      14 reads5 comments
      8.5
      Marker
      14 reads
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      thorgalle2 weeks ago
    • Organizer Sandbox | Joscha Bach | 3/13/20 | 10 min
      2 reads1 comment
      9.0
      Organizer Sandbox
      2 reads
      9.0
      thorgalle2 weeks ago

      Good that someone tried to paste numbers on the oversimplified curve we've all seen: it did not match up. I hope governments know what they're doing.

    • Washington Examiner | 1/1/01 | 4 min
      24 reads10 comments
      9.0
      Washington Examiner
      24 reads
      9.0
      thorgalle2 weeks ago
    • The Atlantic | James Hamblin | 2/24/20 | 16 min
      30 reads3 comments
      9.7
      The Atlantic
      30 reads
      9.7
      thorgalle2 weeks ago
    • washingtonpost | Carl Goldman | 2/28/20 | 6 min
      58 reads16 comments
      9.3
      washingtonpost
      58 reads
      9.3
      thorgalle2 weeks ago

      Corona is a super serious matter. But it's good to read how a 60-something experienced having the disease: he wasn't too stressed.

    • BBC News | Leo Kelion | 8/8/19 | 5 min
      2 reads0 comments
      7.5
      BBC News
      2 reads
      7.5
      thorgalle1 month ago
    • The New Yorker | Charles Bethea | 1/27/20 | 38 min
      7 reads9 comments
      9.5
      The New Yorker
      7 reads
      9.5
      thorgalle1 month ago
    • washingtonpost | 2/11/20 | 45 min
      7 reads5 comments
      9.5
      washingtonpost
      7 reads
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Utterly fascinating. I'm writing this comment from the campus of the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, the same school were Crypto founder Hagelin graduated in 1914 as a mechanical engineer (according to one of the source documents).

      Quoting Jeff here:

      It's hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that some people are actually real life professional spies.

      Because of the above, I got the exact same feeling. It got even crazier when the article covered Kjell-Ove Widman, the Swedish professor that saved MINERVA in 1979 & onwards. I can barely imagine the day he was asked to join this operation, it's not a career path anyone would foresee. He is now living in Stockholm. Who knows, I might have unwittingly seen him in a park somewhere.

      The article brings a sense of the butterfly-effect: how one international persons' study & fascination of cryptography lead to a massive global surveillance program. Mind-boggling. I also like how the source documents links were interweaved with the Post narrative.

    • The New York Times Company | Dan Brooks | 1/29/20 | 6 min
      31 reads16 comments
      8.9
      The New York Times Company
      31 reads
      8.9
      thorgalle1 month ago

      To watch several in succession is to watch increasingly familiar characters endure a kind of psychological experiment, in which they get rewarded, or don’t, according to a system they cannot understand.

      Good read! It concisely brings up some kind of helplessness towards understanding the AI-driven scoring of content.

      This makes me think of the latest Your Undivided Attention episode, wherein Tristan Harris describes a newspaper as a machine producing human attention (from readers). In this machine, there are humans (journalists, editors) deciding what is published and what is not. Their decisions may be influenced by what article will generate most ad-revenue, but they will also have some kind of moral radar.

      Automated attention-generators like TikTok described in the article don't have this type of control. The case of the article is innocuous, but this exact mechanic can also exacerbate fake news/flaming/clickbait rubbish/... Let's be wary, and thanks Readup ;)

    • SC Media | 5/2/19 | 15 min
      2 reads5 comments
      8.0
      SC Media
      2 reads
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      thorgalle1 month ago
    • Silicon Republic | Elaine Burke | 3/12/18 | 6 min
      1 read1 comment
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      Silicon Republic
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      A quite dry but functional historical background to the GDPR.

    • The New York Times Company | Danya Issawi | 1/21/20 | 4 min
      37 reads10 comments
      7.9
      The New York Times Company
      37 reads
      7.9
      thorgalle1 month ago
    • n 1 | 1/13/20 | 46 min
      10 reads13 comments
      10
      n 1
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      thorgalle1 month ago
    • The Atlantic | Derek Thompson | 1/27/20 | 6 min
      22 reads3 comments
      9.1
      The Atlantic
      22 reads
      9.1
      thorgalle1 month ago

      A European student here, from Belgium but now living in Sweden. I found this article intriguing.

      I had good medical support from governments all my life, and am studying "for free" (interesting article!) now without a loan.

      45 percent of Americans ages 25 to 34 have student loans, compared with just 16 percent of Baby Boomers at the same age.

      That's just crazy. I pity the non-EU friends here who don't automatically enjoy the benefits I do. The pressure they are under to get high-paying jobs to pay off those loans makes them stressed, and it's an obstacle to job happiness as well. But it's not just the loans, as the article above states. It's also the amounts & interest rates. Loans needn't be bad it seems.

      It seems that years ago, society in Europe chose more social services over less taxation and higher wages. More in the socialist direction, but when reading this, it doesn't seem to me like a bad choice; and I believe it also decreases the rich/poor divide.

      Young people in their late 20s and early 30s today are about one-third less likely to own a house than their parents were at the same age, according to the Federal Reserve.

      The housing problem exists in EU cities as well. The developments discussed in the article also coincided with huge population growth, and I'm wondering how much that affects the ability to own homes. If we bump on some space limits, we might not be able to do much about it.

      Rent control has a history of reducing new construction, both by discouraging builders from investing in new buildings and by encouraging owners to convert their properties into condos, thus reducing the total stock of rental units and driving up rents.

      This is an interesting argumentation, but very free-market capitalistic in nature. Not what I had expected from the title! Nice that the author seeks balances and highlights past problems.

    • Quartz | MATT PHILLIPS | 5/31/13 | 6 min
      1 read1 comment
      9.0
      Quartz
      1 read
      9.0
      thorgalle1 month ago

      Interesting article! It succeeds in explaining the phenomenon of 0 tuition fees vs. ~100% taking student loans in Sweden, and comparing that to other EU countries and the US. I bumped on this while researching some thoughts I had on How Capitalism Broke Young Adulthood .

    • Highline - HuffPost | 54 min
      24 reads10 comments
      8.5
      Highline - HuffPost
      24 reads
      8.5
      thorgalle1 month ago
    • Fast Company | Lydia Dishman | 1/25/20 | 6 min
      18 reads7 comments
      9.6
      Fast Company
      18 reads
      9.6
      thorgalle1 month ago
    • Organizer Sandbox | Scott Greer | 2/12/18 | 14 min
      2 reads1 comment
      8.0
      Organizer Sandbox
      2 reads
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Scott Greer does a good job summarising the causes and effects of the hopelessly amorphous problem of "tech addiction".

      The title alludes to practical advice to limit addiction on a personal or societal scale, but the author makes it clear he can't answer his own question. I don't blame him for it. We have to look iteratively for many possible solutions, just like we got here step-by-step with each new device and each new platform. Asking the question is where that starts.

    • Man Repeller | 2/18/19 | 6 min
      25 reads11 comments
      9.4
      Man Repeller
      25 reads
      9.4
      thorgalle1 month ago

      A compact piece that packs a lot of punch! Some comments.

      Like many millennials — who are now of course accused of wanting too much in terms of job satisfaction and security

      As a young-end millennial entering the job market, I see friends struggling while chasing dreams versus facing realities. The competition for the most attractive Google or whatever job is high. They either work their asses off unhealthily, or are downcast that they can't have their dream jobs right away (by simply missing experience). The pressure for success is too high. A slow start is OK. When did it stop being OK?

      Or, better yet, because it enables us to truly recharge instead of carving our time into smaller and smaller pieces for someone else’s benefit?

      I didn't really get this part. Is it because more side hustles lead to a more divided and filled schedule?

      I would argue that if it started as your hobby, there should at least be some part in it for your own benefit. The point of the article exactly: monetization shouldn't be the only viable path for hobbies, but surely some are happily pursuing that path for others' benefit, and their own.

      I deal with my option paralysis in the least helpful way possible: by scrolling through my phone alone in the dark until I run out of battery (literally or figuratively) and put myself to bed feeling like I’ve lost something valuable and hating myself for it. I can’t be productive, and I can’t fully relax, and I can’t possibly be alone in this.

      My definite favorite part. Very recognizable & beautifully described. I'm happy I left that exact state by not regularly consuming content on Instagram/Facebook/Twitter anymore for a good year. Reading a book instead (or hey, an article on ReadUp!) is either relaxing, "productive", or both.

    • The Verge | Kaitlyn Tiffany | 2/15/18 | 7 min
      24 reads12 comments
      7.9
      The Verge
      24 reads
      7.9
      thorgalle2 months ago

      They work for some, they don't for others. The numbers that are discussed conveniently only talk about the positive outcomes and leave out any comparative statistics about how they work in the process. How many people have no luck on those platforms whatsoever despite all their effort? Which feelings are involved compared to traditional dating? (compare with social media's relation to FOMO, anxiety, ...) and what's the incidence of those? I'm sure there's interesting figures out there for the "dating app fatigue" camp to back up their anecdotal claims. But those are less likely to be shared by the Tinders of our time whose business model benefits from people actually not having successful dates - just hundreds of shallow swipes & chats with no real consequence, so more ads can be inserted in between. A good article nonetheless.