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    • Eater | Jenny G. Zhang | 9/15/20 | 3 min
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      thorgalle4 weeks ago

      Haha, reminds me of a more dry article about the factories where these are made.

      When it comes to snacking, there are fewer choices finer than a wholly intact sour-cream-and-onion chip,

      I don’t get this. The European Nordics are obsessed with these. With sourcream-and-anything-you-can-imagine. In Belgium the two defaults are salted or paprika flavour, I prefer those any time of the day.

      No matter the flavor of the chips, the taste nearly always smacks overwhelmingly of oil. Eating a small bagful feels like coating one’s mouth in grease, almost like a salve left over to make up for all the vigorous chomping that tooth and tongue and gums had to engage in to facilitate consumption. All that work, and for what?

      Kettle chips do their own thing. I like variation. It’s good to have them all.

    • superorganizers.substack.com | Dan Shipper | 6/26/20 | 12 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      An unlikely analogy with the philosophical debate, but I have to admit that the software abstraction makes sense!

      The paywall is sad though. Never saw such a long article teaser.

    • blog.elementary.io | 7 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      A nice review of anti-broad-tracking analytics software Plausible. I’ve used Piwik/Matomo before, but you always have the concerns of self-hosting & maintenance there. Good to see this SaaS solution making the privacy angle easier.

    • Attention Activist | 4 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Beautiful how this reflection can be applied to life in general. I can relate and need this advice sometimes!

      The very moment any title looks even remotely interesting to you, immediately hit ‘play’.

      Sometimes saying ‘yes’ when I’m thinking ‘no’ opens things up for me.

      That often materializes! Doubts before, but no regrets after. This is an answer to the adage “If it’s not HELL YES, it’s a no”. It seems to come down to balancing the yesses and noes, whatever you think of them :)

    • washingtonpost | Teo Armus | 9/11/20 | 4 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I wouldn't judge the whole movie from a sensationalized trailer or poster before actually seeing it. I do believe movies can function as social commentary as or cautionary tales, there's probably many other commentary films where stills/sections can be taken out context.

      I wonder: if Twitter didn't exist, would Netflix have had the opportunity to quietly change the material after some direct feedback? Would the changed version have triggered a similar outrage?

    • The New Yorker | Larissa MacFarquhar | 3/3/13 | 60 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Impressive article. Not only the content, also the format: the writer quoted many passages from Aaron's own blog articles and (interviews with?) his close friends/family. These were weaved together with her commentary to form a multi-faceted picture of a man with both troublesome and admirable characteristics.

      I haven't read or seen other material on Aaron yet. When I do, I feel this article will bring some healthy nuance to the table.

      He had a beautiful willingness to change his mind completely.” It is a vertiginous thing to have so much freedom—to be always self-skeptical, always testing the reasons for your beliefs, always prepared to abandon them for something better. If you can do anything you want, then every day becomes an existential problem—an empty space of possibility that has no ceiling but also no walls and no floor.

    • The Guardian | Andrew Anthony | 8/5/18 | 7 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I enjoyed Homo Sapiens & Homo Deus. This makes me want to reread the latter one, its arguments and ideas already escaped me. Also good marketing for 21 Lessons! A trilogy of the past, the future and the present... I wonder if he’ll find anything else to write about :)

    • The New Yorker | Helen Rosner | 2/27/20 | 6 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      One more reason to visit Japan at some point!

    • blog.codinghorror.com | Jeff Atwood | 2/2/04 | 11 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Why are updates to my reading list so rare? Because computers change a lot in 10 years, but people don't.

      Remember, absolute power corrupts absolutely. But it also rocks absolutely.

      I skimmed a few similar articles before this one, but it is Jeff Atwood who makes the reading list fun to read!

    • tools.ietf.org | 16 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      All these changes may be contrary to comfortable habits, but so many make sense. My full yes to move away from master/slave and blacklist/whitelist.

      For other terms I find that some creativity & “fun” might get lost in the name of political correctness. But also these changes I understand. “man-in-the-middle” unfortunately rolls off the tongue better than the dry & descriptive “on-path attacker”.

      Fanon makes several persuasive arguments that standard language encodes subconscious in-group, out-group preferences

      That’s just scary.

    • Esquire | Gay Talese | 5/14/16 | 82 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I felt like I missed quite some cultural and historical context to fully grasp this, but it still was an interesting portrait of Frank Sinatra and his surroundings.

      I got tipped of this read in a (fictional) book, Det som inte dödar oss, where it is mentioned as a classical piece of journalism.

    • Civility and Truth | Frank Hecker | 8/14/20 | 13 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      A sad situation, but an understandable choice too.

      senior management of the Mozilla Corporation seem very attached to the idea of software being a “force multiplier” for the Mozilla Foundation’s efforts, supplementing advocacy efforts by creating software that implements the public benefit ideals of the nonprofit.

      Advocacy was the original mission of the Foundation, by dropping Firefox they would lose a lot of reach and credibility for that advocacy.

      Another out there scenario: Firefox (Mozilla Corp) moves back into the Foundation, becoming more insistently donation-based (like Wikipedia, with ~110 million revenue in 2019 and ~90% coming from donations). It might not work, but it would align the revenue model more with their values. Even more out there: the EU allocates some of its income from GDPR/internet antitrust fines (e.g. 5 billion from Google) to an "internet rights" fund that the Mozilla Foundation could then appeal to.

    • Opinionator | 6 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago
    • thorgalle2 months ago

      Sad but true. It also gets harder and harder to report specific content or bugs on big tech platforms, let alone talk with a human about them. All support is blocked off behind generic FAQ walls. If legal clout is the only way to pierce that wall, this is bad for our rights. In that sense I think GDPR can go further in ensuring the practical enforceability of people’s rights, not just providing a vague theoretical framework.

    • UnHerd | 8/9/20 | 9 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      Having lived in Stockholm for a year now this article rang true in many places. The introduction about the summer cabins on the archipelago made me reminisce a kayaking trip I had the luck to do several weeks ago. The writers' description could have been my journal entry for that day (if I would be better at writing). On that trip, the (Canadian) guide also diligently followed corona precautions.

      It's true, the Swedes keep some social distance inherently. They take rules seriously (except red lights on pedestrian crossings). And yes, in stores, people really watch out. But not always, and not everywhere: friends are picknicking huddled together on a blanket in parks, to njuta the sommar. Face masks are a surprising sight. For days now students in the neighborhood have been partying to celebrate the start of a new academic year. They have little apparent regard for distancing in their (semi-drunk) games & activities.

      lagom, meaning “just so” or “neither too much nor too little”. If there is a national characteristic it is surely this — the highest virtue in a culture where excess is frowned upon and rashness is considered dangerous. It explains why, despite a huge number of wealthy people, there are relatively few over-the-top mega mansions in the Stockholm archipelago.

      While this seems true for the archipelago, I wouldn't directly generalize it to Swedish society. There is extreme segregation with poor suburbs of 90% non-Swedish natives, there is an upper class that displays upper class tastes and lives in appropriate neighbourhoods.

    • Heroku | 6/28/11 | 7 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      Heroku making a good case for Heroku: splitting apps and infrastructure while outsourcing the infrastructure probably makes the app more resilient over time.

      Of course, the unspoken dependency here is that if Heroku goes out of business or has other problems, the whole system is suddenly at risk. Migration could be costly. But given the small chances of that and the fact that software doesn’t live forever anyway, it’s an easy trade-off to take.

    • Yle Uutiset | 9 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      "[Learning] English is like an upside down triangle, in that if you learn a little bit, at the bottom, you can make yourself understood," said Sayers. "But to become proficient in professional and academic English, you've got a tonne of stuff to learn."

      Finnish is probably the craziest language in Europe. Both the language, country and people are one of a kind.

      "I think in general gamification is something we should have more of in the education system," says Tenhunen. "For example the portfolio assignments I have been giving let students choose their own paths. So for instance some of my students have been playing video games in French, and they find that really motivating.”

      I kind of agree. MMO chats & UI's are how I got most of my English before school started teaching it. Although this is maybe "language learning from games" rather than "gamification".

      1. Update (8/10/2020):

        Woops, missed a quote on the top there:

        "Finnish is the other way around: to make yourself understood you have to learn an enormous amount of structural grammar, but then once you've got that, to progress on to more professional registers of Finnish is less demanding."

    • Mashable | Jack Morse | 6/22/20 | 3 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      What a burn. With limited evidence to go from though. Still:

      1. Why didn’t Apple have a cycling routing feature yet? I was astounded. 2) Would Google use feedback loops from rider statistics to dynamically adjust their routing algorithm? Or height information?

      Google Maps has improved on the cycling part, but the map detail still lacks. I find Open Street Map based alternatives to work better there.

    • blog.codinghorror.com | 4 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      I remember reading this randomly during my first year undergrad CS. I got a bit sweaty. What if I can’t do the FizzBuzz? Sure enough it worked under 10 mins, with beginner Python knowledge. I remember too needing a second iteration to add in the (var % 3) && (var % 5) condition, which I had forgotten on my first attempt. I still rarely get a program to run after first writing it without any debugging. Programming is an interactive process that takes time! Qualification tests should take that into account.

      I do also feel that (some part of) programming/development has become more abstract and frankly, easier. With all the frameworks and high-level languages available, it’s possible to produce a simple front-end web app without knowing about the existence of the modulo operator. However, that doesn’t excuse job applicants from learning the basics of algorithmic reasoning, data structures & math. They will be needed sooner or later.

    • The New Yorker | Tim Wu | 8/21/15 | 5 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      The "make-work arms race" by mere technological possibility is an interesting insight. I'll try to be on the lookout for this in other contexts. But there's not much you can do against it when you're a lawyer caught in the situation, is there?

      The article also reminds of You’re Not Just Imagining It. Your Job Is Absolute BS. Good to see people thinking about the futility of modern work! :)

    • New Republic | 7/20/20 | 9 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      The question of who is wealthy and who isn’t has political implications that go well beyond electoral politics; it is important for tax policy, among other things.

    • Newsweek België | 7/8/20 | 16 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      Eye-opening. A "new cold war?": this article connected global warming to increased opportunities for oil/gas excavation and traffic in the arctic region. Next, it examined the resulting political tension between mainly the NATO countries and Russia, with related military developments.

      From a climate perspective, it seems the increased human activity in the Arctic region could very well become yet another carbon feedback loop: melting opens up trading routes & materials => more supply & consumption => more emissions => more melting. Not so hopeful.

      From a political and military perspective this is also interesting. The USA recently celebrated the first manned space expedition with an all-American rocket since the Space Shuttle program got discontinued (hooray, no Soyuz-dependence anymore). At the same time, the USA owns 1 ice breaker versus Russia's 40. Reportedly, the USA had to ask for Russia's ice-breaking help in the Antarctic several times already. Political control over the arctic seems a more urgent concern than control over the moon/Mars (but who knows).

      It's a Dutch article, so I guess this will be a lone read (but you could try Chrome's built-in translate feature with Readup?). I want to read this English article on the same topic next: A new Cold War brews as Arctic ice melts - National Geographic. Curious for another perspective.

    • thorgalle2 months ago

      Today I learned: kledingsetiketjes zijn niet altijd duurzaam (en vaak ook fout!). Interessante perspectieven op textielrecyclage.

    • TechCrunch | Josh Constine | 4/19/20 | 8 min
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      thorgalle2 months ago

      Interesting developments for remote social & work life. I do also find myself using voice messages more often since they became more prominent in the UI of messaging applications.

    • Reuters | Raphael Satter | 7/15/20 | 4 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago
    • Zettelkasten Forum | 6 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      A well-meaning critique on Zettelkasten and modern information life. I appreciate this perspective.

    • Nick Punt | Nick Punt | 7/3/20 | 18 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      Mea culpa: allowing users to systematically admit mistakes. A great idea! I'm surprised by the depth of thought that went into this idea ("But what if ... ?"). Many of my own mental objections were answered in the article. That in itself is an inspiring template for tech feature proposals!

      One thing I'm wondering: if replies are disabled, are the original replies also hidden? If the original poster doesn't want to "follow up", then future readers can construe the reason for the mistake by reading the original replies.

    • In Bed With Tech | Marie Dollé | 6/28/20 | 8 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago
    • The Ghost Blog | John O'Nolan | 2/28/14 | 4 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      As always, hard & persistent work pays off! Quoting a linked 2014 article from Atwood:

      It is odd to meet developers that tell me they "grew up" with Coding Horror. But I guess that's what happens when you keep at something for long enough, given a modest amount of talent and sufficient resolve. You become recognized. Maybe even influential. Now, after 10 years, I am finally an overnight success.

      I didn't grow up reading Coding Horror, but I've bumped on the blog many times. He's in the search results for sure!

      I can see how this was (and still is) good marketing for Ghost.

    • blog.codinghorror.com | Jeff Atwood | 2/28/14 | 3 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      Motivational!

      I used to tell people who asked me for advice about blogging that if they couldn't think about one interesting thing to write about every week, they weren't trying hard enough. The world is full of so many amazing things and incredible people. As Albert Einstein once said, there are two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.

      I came here through How One Blog Led to $18m of Funding & The World's Largest Online Q&A Community

    • J.K. Rowling | J.K. Rowling | 20 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      Good read. I read the Harper's open letter first, then stumbled upon an angry opinion piece from a trans woman in a Belgian newspaper (De Standaard), an attack on J.K. Rowling who also signed that letter.

      That led me to duckduckgo for "jk rowling ..." which autocompleted to "... transphobic". Search algorithms are also quick to judge! A few link clicks later I luckily ended up on this article. It's harder to dismiss a nuanced article that demonstrates and backs up a position of genuine concern.

    • Foundation for Economic Education | 3/3/15 | 19 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      I read this essay years ago, I think after following a reference in an economics textbook. Ever since, the title "I, Pencil" lingered in my mind and resurfaced occasionally.

      Yesterday was one such occasion. I chuckled when I read the following sentences in "Not So Simple: Notes from a Tech-Free Life by Mark Boyle":

      I have unplugged myself from industrial civilization.

      ... and a bit later

      Writing with a pencil, I can’t get distracted by clickbait or advertising.

      Lol. Gotcha. Boyle claims he disconnected from industrial civilization. And while I appreciate his article, E. Read here wrote a whole essay on how a pencil is the paradigma of industrial civilization!

      Or so I thought. Rereading now, especially with the introduction to this version, I see that I, Pencil is not only a societal or economical essay, but also a unmistakably political. For the free market, against socialism (or communism in the most extreme sense). While I agree with the W. Reeds' comment "Many first-time readers never see the world quite the same again.", I'm not sure if I like all the philosophical and practical implications of his interpretation... The free market is not without issues, as we see especially today.

    • Plough | 13 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      An interesting read. I think many of his concerns about modernity are real. I agree that "our extreme disconnection from the sources of what we consume" is an important cause in some of those concerns. And I respect him for experimenting with a way to personally get back to a more "natural" way of living.

      But, when I read...

      I have unplugged myself from industrial civilization.

      ... and a bit later

      Writing with a pencil, I can’t get distracted by clickbait or advertising.

      I had to think of the great essay "I, Pencil"; where the complexity of the industrial civilization is explained by the example of a pencil. This, and comments here about the medical emergencies etc. put the article in new light. Indeed, as jbuchana says, I do think he romanticizes his life in the article quite a bit, that it is privileged and even hypocritical. But how much does that matter? It's still an inspiring call for more "off-time" and a re-appreciation of simple things.

      PS: it seems almost impossible to fully reject modernity. Finding the "natural state" of man was also a quest in early modernity itself. The French philosopher Rousseau tried to imagine man without civilization, not easy.

    • Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. | Contributors to Wikimedia projects | 8/19/04 | 6 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago
    • The New Yorker | Haruki Murakami | 2/10/20 | 50 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      My first Murakami. Readup has been pushing it! A fun read throughout, but oh so gripping in the end...

    • thorgalle3 months ago

      Crazy how difficult it can be to retrieve your data from everyday tools.

      And this was a frank reflection on the personal challenges that arise from severing a digital link to people.

    • screentim.es | 6 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      You’re too sad to lose the gold, so you keep the crap.

      Crap and gold. That's the state of the internet. The key thing to realize is: you may actually lose some gold by dropping means of instant communication/social media. But:

      How golden is the gold, really? Is there another kind of gold waiting for you in a life without WhatsApp? Is the gold worth the crap?

      Great questions.

    • washingtonpost | 9/11/19 | 17 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago
    • columbiaroad.com | 8 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      No bullshit & a good high-level overview: what is DevOps and how can it help with growth hacking. Identify the bottlenecks! (disclaimer: blog post from a colleague)

    • washingtonpost | 10/4/19 | 15 min
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      thorgalle3 months ago

      We already had the absurd heat and mitigation engineering in Qatar, now the Washington Post brings us to the once bitterly cold Siberia. Thawing yedoma permafrost perforates the land with puddles and causes floods. Climate refugees abound and mammoths make a fishy comeback. Great reporting on yet another extreme warning case for climate change.

      Yegor Prokopyev, the retired head of Nelemnoye, says climate change is the latest shock to befall the Kolyma River region. There was communism and forced collective farming. Then capitalism and government cutbacks. His grandfather, a peasant, was declared an enemy of the working class and sent to one of this region’s many gulag prison camps. “As soon as you start getting used to something, they’ll come up with something else, and you have to adapt to everything all over again,”

      This brought me back to a scene from Chernobyl (2019). Young soldiers try to evict a stubborn old lady from her house in the radiation zone. She doesn't budge. She overcame wars, revolutions and her children got killed. If the regions most affected by climate change today are already the poorest and least fortunate in history, how can people there bring up the energy for proactively fighting climate change? Or trusting in global cooperation? They live, understandably, in a mode of survival.