1. Join Readup to read with @thorgalle.

    @thorgalle
    26 followers
    • thorgalle1 day ago

      Essential corona read! It feels appropriate to understand the background of the breakthrough technology that will be shot into my body soon. Really exciting developments for (preventative) medicine.

    • The New York Times CompanyNick Bilton9/10/147 min
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      thorgalle2 days ago
    • thorgalle5 days ago

      These are good tips, definitely not easy. They take time and attention without necessarily an immediate pay-off, sometimes a hard sell in consulting work!

    • thorgalle6 days ago

      No. You don’t get past racism by creating new forms of it.

      This makes sense. Why don't we observe that "Some people don't want to enter these studies because they don't have much background in Latin/Greek; we can either give those people extra classes or support, or we can drop the requirement". It doesn't matter who those people are. Why should race have anything to do with this consideration?

      I'm puzzled by, what I observe from afar, the American framing of so many things in terms of racial differences ("the school is x % black, y % white, and z % latino"). I get that this may be useful to point out racism in certain cases, but I also get the feeling that by constantly referring to percentages and quota, racism is perpetuated. It seems terribly difficult, like a Catch-22.

    • potential.apppotential.app3 min
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      Yes yes yes! I wasn't aware of Potential. Thanks to gorillasaurus for leading me here.

      This is the stuff the Center of Humane Tech should be promoting, along with Readup.

      These ideas include both achievable technical interventions (App conditions!) and moonshot dreams (Regret Tax). I get the feeling Potential is working on the achievable ones 👀 I'm really rooting for its success (it reminds me of Siempo and Nudge, two great Humane Tech projects I liked that failed to become viable businesses 😢)

      In the Time Well Spent metric, Readup would surely come up on top (for me at least, here's a recent Screen Time of mine :) ) screen time

    • Piekniewski's blogFilip Piekniewski5/12/2112 min
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      Really interesting! I think I've only gotten a mainstream media marketing perspective on this topic, so it was insightful to read what's really happening in the industry. The linked videos showing the status of real-life autonomous driving were fascinating (open the original web page too to see all embeds).

      The article is pretty accessible, but some parts seem to assume more technical knowledge or background with his blog; I would have appreciated short explanations of those terms and points to make it more level with the rest (is this a popular-scientific or just scientific blog?).

      The key is not to blindly believe that deep learning will solve everything, with just more data and compute, but to soberly estimate what can this tech do and what kinds of real practical problems can be solved with those capabilities. We are not going to get rid of the driver profession anytime soon, but I think we have a high chance of getting rid of the cashier profession [and perhaps a number of other but related professions such as warehouse clerk].

    • Bitcoin MagazineAlex Gladstein5/12/2132 min
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      Wild to hear that this often-dubbed “volatile” currency may be more practical and safe than national currencies in Nigeria, Sudan and Ethiopia. Their financial systems indeed sounds reprehensible. But I get the feeling Bitcoin can only help in limited ways if it gets outlawed... which seems something these regimes are intent on. There’s clearly more to fix there!

    • The AtlanticDerek Thompson5/28/216 min
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      thorgalle1 week ago

      This seems to be happening globally, so interesting to have the driving factors explained a little!

    • The New YorkerJill Lepore2/5/1823 min
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      thorgalle2 weeks ago

      Interesting! This paints the context of Frankenstein specifically, but also shows how a book can have several political “readings” in different times and geographies. Adding Frankenstein somewhere on top of my reading list :)

    • MediumSung J. Woo3/15/2011 min
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      thorgalle3 weeks ago

      Beautiful! I haven’t had a pet so far, but it anyway touched me on a ... human level. This really shows the meaningful emotional connections we humans can develop with dogs and other animals.

    • ricky.substack.comRicky Yean5/16/214 min
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      thorgalle3 weeks ago

      Food for thought. Also nice idea recommending a piece of content regularly; that’s mention #2 of Invisibilia for me.

    • thorgalle3 weeks ago

      A plea for more expressiveness when using font types in design. With practical tips. Makes sense!

    • RyanHoliday.netRyan Holiday2/26/209 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Well, Mr. Holiday writes some stuff worth pondering!

      To be alive, that is the accomplishment. To have your health. To have people you love. This is winning. To get to do the work—that’s the reward, not whether the work is recognized. Which is all we control anyway.

      and then we should, as soon as possible get back down to work

      That last one is a rephrasing of a point I remember from a self-help book summary on Blinkist some years ago. I guess this advice is timeless.

    • Cloakist – BlogLouis Barclay5/11/214 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      It’s valuable for me to hear about “3. Doing marketing, instead of building”. It’s a pattern I’m seeing in the tips & reflections of company founders, also here in this interesting Twitter thread/article by Andrew Wilkinson, about his productivity app Flow, which got outcompeted by Asana.

    • The Freelance Graduate StudentAdam Bartley5/13/217 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Go Adam go! Happy to read that you're enjoying the path you took in your creative work and learning.

      Regarding the podcast, check out this article: Please, Please, For The Love Of God: Do Not Start a Podcast (with which I have many issues btw, please: do start a podcast). But I wouldn't be too concerned immediately about the exact name and who should be on it. Rather: why do you want to start a podcast? What will it be about? What can I as a listener expect to gain from it? And why should I listen to your podcast rather than all others?

    • Thought Catalog10/27/169 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I read this when it topped the AOTD 8 months ago, but I got reminded of the title today when reading about @bartadamley's plans to start a podcast himself.

      Re-reading, I find that this article has many issues (among a few good points).

      First of all, the writer comes over as a know-it-all, and slightly arrogant. He seems to assume the reader knows of him, but I didn't (though I noted he had a Readup hit recently).

      He's praising the medium of podcast and lists successful, high-quality production podcasts that he likes. Then he seems to expect that every new podcast should live up to that same standard.

      I don't think that's how creativity works. Some big things start big because a rich person inflated it with money or prior success. But not everyone can or should start that way. 1) Many current big things have started small, and they were bad in many respects at first. But they had something that made them live on, and grow. 2) People may have varying definitions of success. If someone makes a low-fidelity podcast for their local community; only consumed by and enjoyed by that community; who are you to tell them that they "should not start a podcast"?

      Where he does have a few good points:

      Because “lots of other people are doing it” is a really poor reason to do anything.

      Because when someone really respects a medium, they don’t half-ass their contribution to it.

      Though I don't agree with what he considers half-assing. One person's 'half-assing' might be another's hard work.

      This reminds of streamers streaming to no one, but also of a podcast (how ironic!) about the story of the brand VICE I heard recently: these guys managed to make a 4B $ media company, without journalistic training, against all odds, because they had something to say that people were interested in.

      PS:

      And finally—proving they’re not actually a fan—if you don’t respond to this email right away, they will resend it automatically a few days later, because they’re not actually sending it to you in the first place—a CMS program is.

      This was funny. But I think he meant a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) program, not a Content Management System (CMS).

    • frankchimero.comFrank Chimero8 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      The internet is weird.

    • Digital Music NewsDylan Smith8/17/203 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      A fair warning that the report here is a bit older, but it's really interesting to see the numbers behind this huge subscription business.

      We can in some cases observe the inputs (# of streams, # of paid/ad Spotify revenue), and outputs (actual payments to artists), but the internals remain opaque. We don't know what % publishers take, or what Spotify takes, and so much more.

      I don't like it. It puts the consumer at a larger distance from what is being consumed. Consumers might behave more according to their own ideals and values when they are directly confronted with the impact of their actions, and I think we should strive to reduce that distance. Music streaming is just one of the areas where this applies. Readup is trying to address this for online written media.

      There is an academic branch that studies algorithms like those of Facebook/Twitter (and their racial bias e.g.) by observing inputs and outputs. This article's approach really reminded me of that.

    • Collaborative FundMorgan Housel4/14/219 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Really entertaining read that that makes you feel like you gathered insight at each step. And, a great piece of “explain by example” storytelling, though you’d expect more examples if the aim were to establish serious theories. There are probably counterexamples that discredit his reflections.

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      My colleague Lauri reflects on how it was to start a new Columbia Road consulting office in Stockholm, Sweden; a new country & market for the company. Both from a personal and professional perspective. Plenty of good learnings & tips here! (and plenty of great memories for me too).

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      Good to read this perspective @sjwoo. It's one voice to take into account when making such an impactful decision, maybe the most impactful decision humans can make in their lifetime.

      Some may say it is a life without hope, because children are literally the future and by choosing not to procreate, it's as if I have rejected the very concept of life itself.

      Others may say that it's madness to bring a child into a world ridden by a potentially disastrous climate crisis! At least, that is what is discussed in "Is it OK to have a child?" by Meehan Crist, where she ask the question for herself. Among my all-time Readup favorites. I won't spoil the outcome.

      As always, the saddest fact of living a life is just that, the sole nature of our existence, the singular path of our experience.

      🧙‍♂️I'm not sure whether that's "sad", just fine, or whether we should aspire to infinite life and multiple possible paths of experience. Gets philosophical & sci-fi-feed quite quickly.

    • blog.twitter.comEsther Crawford1 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      This group includes creators, journalists, experts, and nonprofits.

      👀

      Also curious how (much) people will use this. And how the creators will request the tips (follow-up tweet: “if you liked this, tip me in my profile”?).

    • New Money ReviewPaul Amery5/5/214 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      This podcast teaser barges in with fancy terms that make me go 🤔 ("Ponzi-like", "ETH", "counterparty"), but I'll put that podcast on my listen-list anyway!

      I recognized Diehl's name from this Twitter thread rant where he attacks the Bitcoin for its alleged environmental impact. Interesting that this teaser contains not a word about this.

      And while the open-source nature of most cryptocurrency projects means their codebase can be audited, the same principle of openness doesn’t extend to many of the service providers in the sector, says Diehl.

      This criticism makes sense to me. As far as I understand, the layman investor still has to access their crypto coins through a third party, a wallet or so. This shifts the weak link in security to these parties. I remember an interesting "Super Tech Support" podcast "#115 The Bitcoin Hunter" from Reply All where they try to retrieve bitcoins from Mt. Gox, which was hit by massive bitcoin theft, and got bankrupted in 2014-2016.

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      Wow, scary indeed! This story ultimately illustrates the importance of transparency in face of not being able to meet client's expectations; to take the hard road of truth.

      It reminds me of the Swiss Cheese Model of risk prevention. This deception could have been (or can still be??) a hole in one slice of cheese that is now distributed in worldwide reactors. Since watching the famed series Chernobyl (2019), it's maybe also easier to grasp for the world how important small things like tiny metal rods are in the big picture of nuclear safety.

      How could I read this Norwegian article?

      I mostly read this Norwegian article in English, on my computer, through Google Chrome's built-in Translate feature! It's easy: translate feature.

      The translation is (I think) really good for 98% of the sentences or so! These potential issues I noticed:

      • I'm pretty sure that "sliten PC" does not mean "tired PC" but rather, "worn out PC" 🤪.
      • "Malte seg inn i et hjørne" -> "Painted himself into a corner". Maybe better; "to back oneself into a corner"?
      • "Nils Morten Huseby er innstilt på at opprydningen etter Norges atomdrift kan gi flere ubehagelige opplevelser." -> maybe not he is "is in favor for" for unpleasant experiences, but rather "is prepared for" ?

      Kaptein ⚓️, feel free to elucidate 🇳🇴.

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      (Dutch article) Interesting, some good arguments on both sides. Curious what the verdict will be.

      I do think Apple's argument about web apps as a full alternative for native apps is weak though, this is also not true for Readup. Native still has more and better/stronger system APIs.

    • The Freelance Graduate StudentAdam Bartley5/6/217 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Adam, this is epic! Telling your Readup story, explaining why you use it, how you use it, and why you love it. Readup needs more stories like this, and needs to propel them out into the world!

      The article you picked to illustrate the "no distractions" is not one I'd have picked (because I don't see any pesky 'ads' as such in there), but you're totally right! You don't see the title, you don't see the text. That is why Readup's approach is really made for reading.

      I have found that coming up with a response to a quote, and putting my understanding into my own words, is a really powerful way of learning and expanding my thought process on a complicated topic, such as NFTs.

      Yes. This also why I loved this article, simply for acquainting me with the concept of 'The Learning Pyramid':

      People retain 5% of what they learn when they’ve learned from lecture.

      People retain 10% of what they learn when they’ve learned from reading.

      People retain 50% of what they learn when engaged in a group discussion.

      Readup blends reading with group discussions, with the effect of better learning. It intuitively makes sense, though I should check whether there's more hard research on it.

      Readup’s unique reading-tracking technology gauges how many minutes I have been reading the article. This ensures that I have spent the proper time to finish an article, based upon the average reading speed it takes to read X amount of words.

      Maybe it indirectly does gauge minutes (or, it comes up with a "percentage read', which when multiplied with the total minutes would be minutes read), but I think a more accurate characterization would be that Readup approximately tracks which words you have read, and which not. Here's a visualization of that process behind the scenes: tweet with video

      So by reading and posting these articles by the author, I am creating a situation in which she has the opportunity to be compensated through the Readup platform for her writing.

      A small note that the posting is not a requirement for compensation, the reading is!

      ... December 2019 ... ... 624 articles read in total ...

      Mi amigo, I joined in December 2019, I'm at 699 after this one. We are of the same Readup Generation 🙌 I've been planning to write an article like this too for a while, but never did. Epic to see yours. Soon.

      @bill @jeff this is link-in-the-next-newsletter material, or link-from-the-Readup-blog.

      1. Update (5/6/2021):

        Not "for a while". For ~1.5 years.

    • The AtlanticDerek Thompson4/13/216 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Great! Important article. Wash hands regularly, mind ventilation and distance, but don’t go crazy wiping surfaces. Focus on the what matters.

      1. Update (5/5/2021):

        -the

    • De Standaard MobileKarel Verhoeven4/30/212 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      For the increasingly large Dutch-speaking Readup, happy to have you here :)


      Ik houd van podcasts en luisterverhalen. De VRT & NPO doen dat nu al goed. Enkele favorieten zijn Vranckx & Byloo, El Tarangu en BOB van Audiocollectief SCHIK, Berg & Dal, de Tijdschijf, en nog zo veel meer... TV programma's met onderzoekende journalistiek zoals Pano zouden ook geweldig zijn op audio. Dus waarom niet een dieper aanbod in die richting? Graag! Het radionieuws van een paar minuten elk uur is ook maar repetitief en oppervlakkig.

      Ik ben echter echter niet helemaal overtuigd van het model om zélf een podcastplatform te lanceren. Muziek luisteren doe je tegenwoordig met één abonnement dat alles aanbiedt (Spotify, Apple Music, ...). Films en series kijken betekent gelukkig niet meer een individuele DVD kopen of huren, maar het is nog steeds een beetje meer versplinterd dan de muziekwereld (want het aanbod op Netflix verschilt enorm van dat op Disney+, bijvoorbeeld).

      Verdienmodellen voor podcasts (en journalistiek via podcasts), die zijn we nu aan het uitzoeken. Het "gratis" engelstalige aanbod is enorm en werkt vaak met geluidsadvertenties. Dat is voor niemand écht leuk (buiten voor adverteerders, misschien).

      De Standaard laat de selectie van podcasts niet zomaar over aan de algoritmes van internationale techspelers als Spotify en Google. Als redactie willen we ­onze kritische rol ook voor dit nieuwe medium spelen, en voor u ontdekken wat de moeite van het luisteren waard is.

      En hier heeft De Standaard ook een heel goed punt, dat is nog een nadeel van de huidige podcastplatformen. Maar met dat ze nu dit platform lanceren, gaan ze richting de huidige film-situatie. Misschien is dat goed.

      Het Nederlandse platform Blendle bundelt artikels van een grote verzameling kranten samen in een enkel abonnement. Belangrijk is dat je ook naar die artikels kan luisteren. Dat werkt een beetje gelijkaardig aan het engelstalige Audm of Curio. In (een verzameling) van zulke platformen zie ik meer toekomst in dan de situatie waarin elke krant haar eigen platform lanceert.

      De luisteraar verliest wat van de autonomie die de lezer heeft, maar ­ervaart meer aha-gevoel.

      En hier heeft De Standaard ook gelijk. Podcasts en luisteren heeft zo zijn grenzen, het werkt anders. Bij lezen is het gemakkelijker om even te "pauzeren", een paragraaf opnieuw te lezen, en er even over na te denken. Of je ogen over de ondertitels te laten glijden voor je begint. Daarom denk ik ook dat echt lezen belangrijk blijft: het stimuleert begrip op een dieper niveau. Je hebt inderdaad meer autonomie. Niet voor niets kan studeren in het Zweeds vertaald worden naar "att läsa". Dit platform, Readup, is nu al, en wordt nog meer, een goede vriend die bij dat proces kan helpen.

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      Really interesting perspectives from the interviewees. The paragraph about advice from veterans streams also seems solid advice for any online creation endeavour!

      Based on conversations I’ve had with dozens of streamers, taking that initial plunge when you’re not sure anyone is going to watch can feel like throwing a message in a bottle into the sea. Maybe someone will find it. Maybe the bottle ends up lost in the abyss. We all gamble in our own ways when we reach out online, whether we’re swiping right on Tinder or using a hashtag to look for people with similar interests. Maybe we end up feeling more alienated than ever before, or maybe we find people who make everything worth it.

      Also fascinating how this extrapolates to digital life online at large. Does writing a Readup comment feel like throwing a message bottle into the sea? I hope less so. Maybe it does.

      1. Update (5/1/2021):

        *from veteran streamers

    • Wait But WhyTim Urban9/12/1442 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Calling this the full story of Iraq is overblown, even for a lengthy-ish 40-minute article. But the goal of the article is to make you "really understand what’s going on in that country—better than you do now", and for me it achieved that last part well.

      If you can't tell Sunni from Shia, or Arab from Kurd, this is a good and fascinating/poignant start. The article tied together some loosely connected facts for me.

      However, as with all Wait But Why's simplified explanations, I get the feeling that subject matter experts would get annoyed at important nuances being skipped over. Can't have it all though. That's WBW.

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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Interesting! Would be a good idea for a camp in the wild some day. With marinated tofu then. And eggplants.

      Finally we dug out the pig and vegetables. While it was tasty, this was definitely more about trying the technique than the taste. 😂

    • EsquireHaley Mlotek4/19/2110 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      I found this pretty complicated. Then again, the subject is complicated.

    • frankchimero.comFrank Chimero17 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      Really interesting article! Thanks deep. It illustrates well the frustration in designers (and developers, a role which he also seems to assume?) that can follow from a web that is changing as quickly as it does. But also a mindset of adapting to this change.

      I believe the author misses one critical point in his reflection on 15 years of change, and reminiscence of simple, readable HTML and CSS: the environment and role of websites (read: web apps) has become much more complex as well.

      15 years ago a browser was not necessarily the main program on a computer. YouTube and Facebook were still babies.

      Today so much of our time is spent in a browser, or an app that is a browser in disguise (e.g. Slack), or a mobile app that accesses the same data as the browser apps. The cloud model is real and took over computing at large. Responsive is a requirement, with all ensuing complexities.

      The simple informational website is still relevant, but less relevant in a world with social networks. And today, the web powers so much more than informational websites, and is used in many more ways. This requires more complexity in the ecosystem.

      But when it comes to the informational websites, he shares some good learnings.


      Directness is best in my experience, so a great photo, memorable illustration, or pitch-perfect sentence does most of the work. Beyond that, fancy implementation has never moved the needle much for my clients.

      If you can write markup, you don’t need Medium or Twitter or Instagram (though they’re nice to have). And the best way to help someone write markup is to make sure they can read markup.

      Huh?

      Many of my design peers are the same. We possess skills to make websites, but we stopped there. We stuck with markup and never progressed into full-on programming, because we were only willing to go as far as things were legible.

      Which might be fine for simple websites, but surprise surprise, if you want to get the effects of "full-on programming", such as interactivity, data processing and data storage, you need to adopt a developer/engineer role & mindset. People have tried to embed these capabilities into XML/HTML markup languages, but I think there are good reasons why this didn't become mainstream.

      Let’s be more like that tortoise: diligent, direct, and purposeful. The web needs pockets of slowness and thoughtfulness as its reach and power continues to increase. What we depend upon must be properly built and intelligently formed. We need to create space for complexity’s important sibling: nuance. Spaces without nuance tend to gravitate towards stupidity. And as an American, I can tell you, there are no limits to the amount of damage that can be inflicted by that dangerous cocktail of fast-moving-stupid.

      Further reading: Slow is good but steady is everything - Bill Loundy, CEO of Readup

    • start.longlife.bike5 min
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      thorgalle1 month ago

      This project went the full circle and arrived back at the community that was their starting point.

      This means both electrical and non-electrical market segments are getting more competitive and leaning towards a red ocean.

      I had to look up 'red ocean', but a search explains enough: a bloody, competition-based market.

      Therefore, it's promising to see many new bicycle offerings coming up including maintenance and repair services.

      Bikes-as-a-service with regular maintenance 🤔 Sounds promising indeed. It would increase bike & component life and hence sustainability, a nicer riding experience because issues would be taken care of preventively!

      Besides that, we are looking into meaningful ways that slow travellers can thank their host. How cool would it be if travellers could give organic Welcome To My Garden seeds to their hosts?

      👀 what comes up here. We can do better than likes and loves, and maybe even better than claps.

      Over the long term, we also want to explore how we can encourage cities and municipalities to get involved with Welcome To My Garden. Ideally, we’d like to add an extra data layer with shelters for slow travellers in public spaces.

      Yes, yes, yes. The European nordics have the "freedom to roam" which makes outdoor camping a breeze. Belgium doesn't have that. Reasonable, because it is less practical to organize in such a densely populated country. Still, in the absence of alternatives, this does steal a fundamental human freedom from citizens; which is why Welcome To My Garden is so genius! If a government wants to promote more sustainable travel they really need to support such initiatives. Slow outdoor travel in Belgium has been an absolute PITA, or nearly impossible if you want to keep to legal camping sites off-season.

      Their Impact Report (embedded but not shown in Readup) is really impressive, both in content and composition. 13k users in one year! And some interesting stories (donkey travel?? 😜).

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      A hidden KPOP army ready to 200% jump on whatever their idols endorse... Intriguing, but I also find these consumerist dynamics a bit sad. Especially when youth is targeted to power a money machine (though, not sure if that's the case here).

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      From the title I thought this was going to be a story about the corona hardships in high school (missed the date!), but I was clearly wrong.

      A piece full of energy and willingness to live. Inspiring! Maybe even for corona-time high school students now!

      I definitely know the meaning of ‘don’t spread yourself too thin,’ even though I will probably continue to do so. (I have always liked challenges.)

    • thorgalle1 month ago

      Linguistically elucidating before all else

      PS: broke for me on Readup browser, works on Readup mobile.