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      commented1 day ago

      I can see that a massively old population poses a decades-long issue, hopefully China can reach a new balance afterwards.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted2 weeks ago
      attentionsettings.comWelf von Hören11 min
      attentionsettings.com

      I love how Welf’s Attention Settings concept takes a serious stab at the persuasive tech issue with a comprehensive set of concrete, actionable interventions.

      Philosophizing on what Meta etc could do to make their product more respectful of attention is wishful thinking. This however is a plausible approach, with huge obstacles nonetheless.

      This concept doesn’t solve the root problem of misaligned incentives due to the advertising-based business model

      It doesn’t, and that is the largest obstacle. But if Apple/the EU could force big tech to give users control, as increasingly happens with “privacy” settings, then big tech will have to adapt to keep their revenue stream going: they have to ask money to compensate for enabled Attention Settings, or deny access to (parts of) apps otherwise.

      Such a regulated environment could lead into an “organic food for the rich, GMO food for the relative poor” type of situation. And regardless, it would hit big tech’s bottom line. But I think those are better problems to have than the status quo, where for-profit corporations steer attention in semi-essential public technologies, with all ensuing negative effects.

      Very large platforms like Facebook and TikTok represent the primary social environment for a whole generation of teenagers. Their current design is a serious threat to this generation’s mental health, yet opting out of the service entirely comes at great social cost and exclusion.

      People have to pay for cellular service, water and electricity. That one isn’t allowed to pay for social media on one’s terms is an extant failure of regulation.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted4 weeks ago

      This is impressive. We still have a 2009 iMac in daily use here, but it's stuck on an old OS. Which might lead to security issues. I've been looking into installing a modern Linux distro on it, or a hacked macOS upgrade. All those procedures come with caveats: certain hardware might not be supported anymore, or trying the installation will take time.

      Maybe the ease of these installs is worth the telemetry that ChromeOS will send to Google 👀

    • thorgalle
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      scouted1 month ago

      Damn… what’s worse is that these inhuman situations in trailers are not unprecedented. Google “Essex lorry deaths”, 39 suffocated when being smuggled from Belgium to the UK in 2019.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted1 month ago
      The Motley FoolHoward Smith6/24/211 min
      The Motley Fool

      So, the last dip was mainly caused by China. If a government can wipe out about 70% of global Bitcoin miners, then decentralization of the coin is limited in reality. China’s perspective on tech is interesting. Here’s a podcast explaining other types of control they do.

    • thorgalle
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      commented1 month ago

      Very impressive feat! I have to admit I’m also a little weirded out, I had no idea such transplantations were possible.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted1 month ago
      hq.getmatter.com5 min
      hq.getmatter.com

      Interesting to say the least! Matter is scrapping social features and basically becoming Pocket 2.1; by making the article “Queue" their default tab, but being far more ambitious on the experience of article sourcing and organization.

      It's cool what they’re doing.

      But, I have concerns about Twitter not being an ideal "conversation layer of the internet", especially when it comes to commenting on articles. I'm also still wondering what their business model will be (maybe they are too?).

      Readup is very far from perfect and likely will never be the social reading layer of the internet, but this move might just have given Readup's niche more legitimacy.

    • thorgalle
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      commented1 month ago
      The Daily BeastMatt Lewis6/14/226 min
      The Daily Beast

      Interesting development; I read a long analysis here recently on how Biden was the “probably yes” option with Harris as the most likely alternative, this is decidedly rejecting both.

    • thorgalle
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      commented1 month ago
      The Daily BeastMatt Lewis6/14/226 min
      The Daily Beast

      Interesting development; I read a long analysis here recently on how Biden was the “probably yes” option with Harris as the most likely alternative, this is decidedly rejecting both.

    • thorgalle
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      read1 month ago
    • thorgalle
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      commented1 month ago
      DYNOMIGHTdynomight12/14/2110 min
      DYNOMIGHT

      Even more interesting are plans that work best if you yourself don’t understand them. For these, your best hope is that you inherit a culture that’s figured them out for you […]

      Interesting to reflect on.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted2 months ago
      httptoolkit.tech8 min
      httptoolkit.tech

      (this is a technical blog post) Helpful people on the internet are always nice! I was looking into GraphQL for a small project, and Apollo is indeed the first thing that pops up.

      I'm happy to have the habit of researching alternatives before diving into the most SEO’d solution. This small post shows how to get started with GraphQL with minimal dependencies, and Tim makes solid points on package maintenance in the JS ecosystem too.

    • thorgalle
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      commented2 months ago
      crumplab.com58 min
      crumplab.com

      Enjoyable read! Maybe a bit long. The student that plagiarized the academic integrity pledge blew my mind.

      I think distance learning during the pandemic facilitated this behavior enormously, and made it cross the line of cheating.

      During my bachelor, student associations had (public!) wikis where students would dump the questions they remembered from exams. Those archives go years back, so you can see questions reoccur often. Just an example. There were even people who solved every single problem in a textbook and published them in Q&A form on Github: both are great test prep resources.

      Of course, the difference is that you can't copy-paste from these resources in a closed-book, paper-and-pen exam. If a professor reuses an exact set of memorizeable multiple-choice questions ever year, it's kind of on them that students seem more knowledgeable than they are. In the case of this article the cheating was obvious, because memorization was not even involved. But I think professors should expect students to refer to old exam questions as test prep, and I wouldn't directly consider that cheating.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted2 months ago

      Wow! That’s one Bandcamp newsletter email I’m happy I didn’t unsubscribe from.

      Fastfall is one of the first soundtracks I ever listened to independently of its game. I had it on repeat until years after its release. The same counts for Immerse that came two years later, I didn’t even bother playing the related game but just listened to the music. Both are among my all-time favorite electronic music albums!

      I looked up Lee (& Hitbox Team) several times over the years hoping for more music, but not much seemed to happen. There was also very little to find about him online, outside of his Bandcamp page & SoundCloud.

      Little did I know that Fastfall set off a collaboration & love story behind the scenes. How wonderful! I can’t wait to dive into that new 60-track album tomorrow.

    • thorgalle
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      commented2 months ago

      Living in Helsinki we all saw this coming with the polls months back. Putin really reaps what he sows, and it’s sad.

      Finland has historically been a place where Russia and the West meet. Even literally: there were US-Russia summits in Helsinki in 1990 and 2018. And Finland used to be occupied by Sweden first and Russia later before becoming independent in 1917, contributing to shared histories with both. Putin changed Finland from a western country with relatively good Russia relations to a gap-filler in the NATO front.

    • thorgalle
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      commented2 months ago
      BioSpace5/11/222 min
      BioSpace

      Sounds like good progress! I’m wondering: do at-risk babies grow out of this risk factor eventually? The name kind of implies it.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted3 months ago
      Tom's HardwareAvram Piltch5/30/204 min
      Tom's Hardware

      A name change in Linux not resulting from a feud. Nice 🙂

    • thorgalle
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      scouted3 months ago

      I’ve worked as a Flutter developer for several months now, and I’m impressed with the iOS/Android offering. It has a performance edge over web-based technologies (like React Native, and Ionic especially), but also has great tooling and convincing OS integrations.

      I see massive potential for Flutter in the desktop market. Electron has shown that devs want to share code between platforms (Slack, VSCode, …), but these apps always feel bulky and relatively slow because they all contain a web browser. Flutter can remove the web layer and get closer to raw system code while keeping the code-sharing.

      But mind you, I’ve found Flutter on web pretty slow and unintuitive: there they have to add an extra layer on top of the web. It also doesn’t feel right.

      Today we’re announcing the graduation of Flutter/Firebase integration to a fully-supported core part of the Firebase offering. We’re moving the source code and documentation into the main Firebase repo and site, and you can count on us evolving Firebase support for Flutter in lockstep with Android and iOS.

      Good! This FlutterFire / Firebase situation was… very messy.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted3 months ago
    • thorgalle
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      read3 months ago
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      scouted3 months ago
      protocolDavid Pierce12/21/2124 min
      protocol

      “I would have loved to have Instapaper or Pocket,” Mullenweg said when the topic of reading apps came up. He’s a Pocket user now, and loves the app, but it’s owned by Mozilla. Which, of course, brings up the idea of web browsers; if you want to preserve user agency and power on the internet, the browser is a place to start. “I would be very, very interested in Mozilla,” Mullenweg said. “Or maybe, like, a Brave.”

      Gulp.

      I read this as supplementary reading to Matt’s great podcast with Guy Raz at NPR. I recommend both!

    • thorgalle
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      scouted3 months ago

      A dry press release, but the concept released is really cool! It’s smart how they bypass the huge complexity and regulatory hurdles of autonomous vehicles by limiting the problem domain & risk: sidewalks, crossings, and no humans on board.

      I used to live in the campus area where they deployed it now. I’d probably still walk or bike the five minutes to the local convenience store most of the time, but I can see this system being useful in some cases.

    • thorgalle
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      commented3 months ago

      I know someone who played Axie as a nearly full-time job. I was surprised this was even possible! I hope the hack didn't rush his livelihood now, but at the same time, the person who dives into Axie as an early adopter probably also quickly finds an alternative livelihood.

      It's sad that it is (or was) known as a "play-to-earn" game. This article aptly compares it to skill-based gambling.

      I suppose a crypto game economy that can support people's livelihoods is plausible, as long as it is driven by real, creative, in-game value production, and has transparent and stable market mechanics.

      As the article says, such a game would have to scale on an intrinsic "fun" factor rather than the prospect of making money. Otherwise, there is no real demand side in the market. Maybe Axie gets there before another game does!

    • thorgalle
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      scouted4 months ago
      Not Boring by Packy McCormickPacky McCormick3/21/2246 min
      Not Boring by Packy McCormick

      While this is a very long and unapologetic sales pitch of an investor in Ramp, I have to admit it convincingly presents the company as one that has found the potential to reframe & steer the whole of corporate spending with technology.

      I wonder what the long-term effects will be of such widespread control over transactions. Will there be the equivalent of filter bubbles in Google search?

    • thorgalle
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      commented4 months ago

      There are some weird parser/formatting issues in this article. If a paragraph seems off, skip to the next one! It's repeated.

      It’s interesting how much is not new in DAOs.

      First, it’s hard to untangle the appeal of a DAO from the lure of price speculation. (Maybe you just hope your DAO’s token goes “to the moon.”)

      A real issue. Both the appeal and scepticism of blockchain currencies easily transfer to DAOs.

      An implicit risk of DAO work, says Dupont, is a “deep financialization of the everyday.”

      I’m connecting this to the recent "Wallgreens installs screens on glass fridge doors get ad revenue” article. It seems like the ad economy made us realize that every second of our attention has monetary value. A major risk indeed for wellness.

    • thorgalle
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      commented4 months ago
      Autostraddle2/17/2240 min
      Autostraddle

      A significant part of the long reads in the AOTD history feel like supplemental reading for a gender studies class. I don’t think that’s a bad thing 🙂

    • thorgalle
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      scouted4 months ago
      Duolingo BlogLuis von Ahn3/14/224 min
      Duolingo Blog

      A company response that makes me go “wow”

      But we are also seeing large spikes in Poland, where the number of learners has increased by more than 1800%, which we suspect is caused by people in Poland who are welcoming and hosting refugees.

    • thorgalle
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      read5 months ago
    • thorgalle
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      read5 months ago
    • thorgalle
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      commented5 months ago
      The Guardian2/28/224 min
      The Guardian

      I was waiting for the Harari analysis here! Short but powerful. Thanks for scouting Deep. The Snake Island story is remarkable, incredibly poignant, but also an example for the world. I suppose there are thousands of snake-island stories happening these days that we don’t hear of. The bravery of Ukrainians & protesting Russians is impressive. It’s horrible what they have to go through.

    • thorgalle
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      commented5 months ago
      POLITICOZoya Sheftalovich2/26/227 min
      POLITICO

      And now there’s also the historical decision of Germany/Sweden/Finland to send arms to Ukraine. The West vs Putin power struggle materializes increasingly. Putin stands to lose, I hope he doesn’t make further emotional decisions…

    • thorgalle
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      scouted5 months ago
      The New York Times CompanyAnton Troianovski2/24/226 min
      The New York Times Company
    • thorgalle
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      scouted5 months ago

      Just one on the many Belgian and Finland-Swedish articles I’ve read about the ongoing events in Ukraine today. This situation sure is super serious. Horrible. I dearly hope it will be possible to contain the conflict, if not repell it, and that it won’t expand. I hope Ukrainian citizens get the aid they need. In any case, the whole of Europe is up for economic impacts, and a bad relation with Russia that might linger as much COVID will... It’s also extra significant for Finland, where I reside. It neighbors Russia, and is not part of NATO either (but it is a EU member). This had me research European defense structures for a while… So unnecessary :(

      1. Update (2/24/2022):

        I realize this article is useless for most Readup readers, reading local news seemed appropriate now. I’d encourage all anglophones to read up on the situation with Readup, and to post good articles! It’s an important scouting opportunity.

    • thorgalle
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      commented5 months ago

      Remarkable how many elements of this story are similar to the recent “The Tinder Swindler” on Netflix (or VG’s interactive story). The most crucial ones seem to be convincing victims of their wealth by demonstrating excessive spending over some time, combined with some kind of pyramid lending scheme.

      I wonder if she really imagined she could make this plot work out well with the art center’s success (and was so deluded), or if she knew it was a ticking time bomb from the start.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted5 months ago

      I binged this podcast in a few days around the weekend. It was gripping for sure, but I thought informative as well.

      Ultimately, one false narrative – that there was a problem of violent extremism in these schools – is never improved by another: that beyond Islamophobia there was nothing much to see here at all.

      I don't think they conveyed that there "was nothing much to see here at all". Indeed, it’s true the podcast doesn't talk at length about the various (true) testimonials and other whistleblowing that did come up after the hoax letter surfaced, but they do mention some important ones. They focused on the origin and motivation behind the letter, and tried to connect the dots to such a widespread overblown response that made the whole Muslim subculture suspicious by default in education and elsewhere. I don't think they contend that an intervention was necessary, they seem to suggest it could have been more localised and excluded the terrorism stamp.

      Even though Reed and Syed later concede the accuracy of the female whistleblowers’ account – that pupils were taught that wives cannot refuse their husbands sex – the journalists use three sources to try to undermine other aspects of the women’s testimony. But they fail to reveal pertinent information about the sources which raises serious questions about their credibility. And the whistleblowers are named in the podcast, even though they had understood they would be contributing anonymously.

      I think it's fair that every aspect of a testimony is evaluated individually. Of course, lying about anonymity, and some more points here, ARE problematic with the podcast. Always good to see other views on a gripping story!

      1. Update (2/22/2022):

        Some things seemed really good in the podcast. For example, that they show that the suspected hoax letter was used in so many cases (legal cases, reports, police questioning) where it shouldn't have been.

    • thorgalle
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      commented5 months ago

      Fascinating. Not just the AI, also the mere existence of these undeciphered scripts, their potential political meaning and all the people working on them.

    • thorgalle
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      commented5 months ago

      Some social and political dynamics of the meme-watching internet. Really interesting.

    • thorgalle
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      scouted5 months ago

      Shamelessly plugging this ad for an app that is doing cool things: helping people live with more intentionality in the digital world. It will indeed take more companies and other changes to build the inverse function to the extractive attention economy. I’m happy to see this step in the right direction.

    • thorgalle
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      commented6 months ago
      douglasadams.comDouglas Adams9 min
      douglasadams.com

      According to the listing page, this was published in the first Wired issue. Which would be in 1995. What a funny and optimistic prediction of the present internet, accurate from some angles and wrong in many others. It’s got Douglas’ touch.

      Douglas would turn in his grave learning that marketing still exists, and that it still costs money. Moreover, ads haven't become magically better. They might even have become worse in their intrusiveness (but what do I know, I'm a 90s kid).

      I like the analogy of the internet as rivers and streams however. And the framework of "removing parts from a problem" is interesting too for as long as it works.

      With a little extra cable laying it seems to me that they could have moved UK Directory Enquiries to St Helena or the Falklands, thus bringing whole new possibilities of employment to areas that were previously limited to the things you could do with sheep.

      Once we drop the idea of discretely bound and sold sheaves of glossily processed wood pulp from the model, what do we have left? Anything useful?

      From the reader's point of view it's useful in much the same way that a paper magazine is: it's a concentration of the sort of stuff she's interested in, in a form that's easy to locate with the added advantage that it will be able to point seamlessly at all kinds of related material in a way that a paper magazine cannot. All well and good.

      1. Update (2/11/2022):

        This long Bill Gates interview, similarly from the 90s, is another optimistic historical view on the internet. Maybe we can learn from this when looking at blockchain tech today.

    • thorgalle
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      commented6 months ago

      Update: to form your own opinion, I'd recommend to also read a response to these accusations published in Input.