1. The world's best reading app

    Download Readup to read with @thorgalle

    Thor GalleVerified
    @thorgalle
    Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented4 days ago

      Living in Helsinki we all saw this coming with the polls months back. Putin really reaps what he sows, and it’s sad.

      Finland has historically been a place where Russia and the West meet. Even literally: there were US-Russia summits in Helsinki in 1990 and 2018. And Finland used to be occupied by Sweden first and Russia later before becoming independent in 1917, contributing to shared histories with both. Putin changed Finland from a western country with relatively good Russia relations to a gap-filler in the NATO front.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented1 week ago
      BioSpace5/11/222 min
      BioSpace

      Sounds like good progress! I’m wondering: do at-risk babies grow out of this risk factor eventually? The name kind of implies it.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted1 week ago
      Tom's HardwareAvram Piltch5/30/204 min
      Tom's Hardware

      A name change in Linux not resulting from a feud. Nice 🙂

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted1 week ago

      I’ve worked as a Flutter developer for several months now, and I’m impressed with the iOS/Android offering. It has a performance edge over web-based technologies (like React Native, and Ionic especially), but also has great tooling and convincing OS integrations.

      I see massive potential for Flutter in the desktop market. Electron has shown that devs want to share code between platforms (Slack, VSCode, …), but these apps always feel bulky and relatively slow because they all contain a web browser. Flutter can remove the web layer and get closer to raw system code while keeping the code-sharing.

      But mind you, I’ve found Flutter on web pretty slow and unintuitive: there they have to add an extra layer on top of the web. It also doesn’t feel right.

      Today we’re announcing the graduation of Flutter/Firebase integration to a fully-supported core part of the Firebase offering. We’re moving the source code and documentation into the main Firebase repo and site, and you can count on us evolving Firebase support for Flutter in lockstep with Android and iOS.

      Good! This FlutterFire / Firebase situation was… very messy.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted2 weeks ago
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      read2 weeks ago
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 weeks ago
      protocolDavid Pierce12/21/2124 min
      protocol

      “I would have loved to have Instapaper or Pocket,” Mullenweg said when the topic of reading apps came up. He’s a Pocket user now, and loves the app, but it’s owned by Mozilla. Which, of course, brings up the idea of web browsers; if you want to preserve user agency and power on the internet, the browser is a place to start. “I would be very, very interested in Mozilla,” Mullenweg said. “Or maybe, like, a Brave.”

      Gulp.

      I read this as supplementary reading to Matt’s great podcast with Guy Raz at NPR. I recommend both!

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted1 month ago

      A dry press release, but the concept released is really cool! It’s smart how they bypass the huge complexity and regulatory hurdles of autonomous vehicles by limiting the problem domain & risk: sidewalks, crossings, and no humans on board.

      I used to live in the campus area where they deployed it now. I’d probably still walk or bike the five minutes to the local convenience store most of the time, but I can see this system being useful in some cases.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented1 month ago

      I know someone who played Axie as a nearly full-time job. I was surprised this was even possible! I hope the hack didn't rush his livelihood now, but at the same time, the person who dives into Axie as an early adopter probably also quickly finds an alternative livelihood.

      It's sad that it is (or was) known as a "play-to-earn" game. This article aptly compares it to skill-based gambling.

      I suppose a crypto game economy that can support people's livelihoods is plausible, as long as it is driven by real, creative, in-game value production, and has transparent and stable market mechanics.

      As the article says, such a game would have to scale on an intrinsic "fun" factor rather than the prospect of making money. Otherwise, there is no real demand side in the market. Maybe Axie gets there before another game does!

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted1 month ago
      Not Boring by Packy McCormickPacky McCormick3/21/2246 min
      Not Boring by Packy McCormick

      While this is a very long and unapologetic sales pitch of an investor in Ramp, I have to admit it convincingly presents the company as one that has found the potential to reframe & steer the whole of corporate spending with technology.

      I wonder what the long-term effects will be of such widespread control over transactions. Will there be the equivalent of filter bubbles in Google search?

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented2 months ago

      There are some weird parser/formatting issues in this article. If a paragraph seems off, skip to the next one! It's repeated.

      It’s interesting how much is not new in DAOs.

      First, it’s hard to untangle the appeal of a DAO from the lure of price speculation. (Maybe you just hope your DAO’s token goes “to the moon.”)

      A real issue. Both the appeal and scepticism of blockchain currencies easily transfer to DAOs.

      An implicit risk of DAO work, says Dupont, is a “deep financialization of the everyday.”

      I’m connecting this to the recent "Wallgreens installs screens on glass fridge doors get ad revenue” article. It seems like the ad economy made us realize that every second of our attention has monetary value. A major risk indeed for wellness.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented2 months ago
      Autostraddle2/17/2240 min
      Autostraddle

      A significant part of the long reads in the AOTD history feel like supplemental reading for a gender studies class. I don’t think that’s a bad thing 🙂

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted2 months ago
      Duolingo BlogLuis von Ahn3/14/224 min
      Duolingo Blog

      A company response that makes me go “wow”

      But we are also seeing large spikes in Poland, where the number of learners has increased by more than 1800%, which we suspect is caused by people in Poland who are welcoming and hosting refugees.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      read2 months ago
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      read2 months ago
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented2 months ago
      The Guardian2/28/224 min
      The Guardian

      I was waiting for the Harari analysis here! Short but powerful. Thanks for scouting Deep. The Snake Island story is remarkable, incredibly poignant, but also an example for the world. I suppose there are thousands of snake-island stories happening these days that we don’t hear of. The bravery of Ukrainians & protesting Russians is impressive. It’s horrible what they have to go through.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented2 months ago
      POLITICOZoya Sheftalovich2/26/227 min
      POLITICO

      And now there’s also the historical decision of Germany/Sweden/Finland to send arms to Ukraine. The West vs Putin power struggle materializes increasingly. Putin stands to lose, I hope he doesn’t make further emotional decisions…

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted2 months ago
      The New York Times CompanyAnton Troianovski2/24/226 min
      The New York Times Company
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted2 months ago

      Just one on the many Belgian and Finland-Swedish articles I’ve read about the ongoing events in Ukraine today. This situation sure is super serious. Horrible. I dearly hope it will be possible to contain the conflict, if not repell it, and that it won’t expand. I hope Ukrainian citizens get the aid they need. In any case, the whole of Europe is up for economic impacts, and a bad relation with Russia that might linger as much COVID will... It’s also extra significant for Finland, where I reside. It neighbors Russia, and is not part of NATO either (but it is a EU member). This had me research European defense structures for a while… So unnecessary :(

      1. Update (2/24/2022):

        I realize this article is useless for most Readup readers, reading local news seemed appropriate now. I’d encourage all anglophones to read up on the situation with Readup, and to post good articles! It’s an important scouting opportunity.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented2 months ago

      Remarkable how many elements of this story are similar to the recent “The Tinder Swindler” on Netflix (or VG’s interactive story). The most crucial ones seem to be convincing victims of their wealth by demonstrating excessive spending over some time, combined with some kind of pyramid lending scheme.

      I wonder if she really imagined she could make this plot work out well with the art center’s success (and was so deluded), or if she knew it was a ticking time bomb from the start.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted2 months ago

      I binged this podcast in a few days around the weekend. It was gripping for sure, but I thought informative as well.

      Ultimately, one false narrative – that there was a problem of violent extremism in these schools – is never improved by another: that beyond Islamophobia there was nothing much to see here at all.

      I don't think they conveyed that there "was nothing much to see here at all". Indeed, it’s true the podcast doesn't talk at length about the various (true) testimonials and other whistleblowing that did come up after the hoax letter surfaced, but they do mention some important ones. They focused on the origin and motivation behind the letter, and tried to connect the dots to such a widespread overblown response that made the whole Muslim subculture suspicious by default in education and elsewhere. I don't think they contend that an intervention was necessary, they seem to suggest it could have been more localised and excluded the terrorism stamp.

      Even though Reed and Syed later concede the accuracy of the female whistleblowers’ account – that pupils were taught that wives cannot refuse their husbands sex – the journalists use three sources to try to undermine other aspects of the women’s testimony. But they fail to reveal pertinent information about the sources which raises serious questions about their credibility. And the whistleblowers are named in the podcast, even though they had understood they would be contributing anonymously.

      I think it's fair that every aspect of a testimony is evaluated individually. Of course, lying about anonymity, and some more points here, ARE problematic with the podcast. Always good to see other views on a gripping story!

      1. Update (2/22/2022):

        Some things seemed really good in the podcast. For example, that they show that the suspected hoax letter was used in so many cases (legal cases, reports, police questioning) where it shouldn't have been.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago

      Fascinating. Not just the AI, also the mere existence of these undeciphered scripts, their potential political meaning and all the people working on them.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago

      Some social and political dynamics of the meme-watching internet. Really interesting.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago

      Shamelessly plugging this ad for an app that is doing cool things: helping people live with more intentionality in the digital world. It will indeed take more companies and other changes to build the inverse function to the extractive attention economy. I’m happy to see this step in the right direction.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago
      douglasadams.comDouglas Adams9 min
      douglasadams.com

      According to the listing page, this was published in the first Wired issue. Which would be in 1995. What a funny and optimistic prediction of the present internet, accurate from some angles and wrong in many others. It’s got Douglas’ touch.

      Douglas would turn in his grave learning that marketing still exists, and that it still costs money. Moreover, ads haven't become magically better. They might even have become worse in their intrusiveness (but what do I know, I'm a 90s kid).

      I like the analogy of the internet as rivers and streams however. And the framework of "removing parts from a problem" is interesting too for as long as it works.

      With a little extra cable laying it seems to me that they could have moved UK Directory Enquiries to St Helena or the Falklands, thus bringing whole new possibilities of employment to areas that were previously limited to the things you could do with sheep.

      Once we drop the idea of discretely bound and sold sheaves of glossily processed wood pulp from the model, what do we have left? Anything useful?

      From the reader's point of view it's useful in much the same way that a paper magazine is: it's a concentration of the sort of stuff she's interested in, in a form that's easy to locate with the added advantage that it will be able to point seamlessly at all kinds of related material in a way that a paper magazine cannot. All well and good.

      1. Update (2/11/2022):

        This long Bill Gates interview, similarly from the 90s, is another optimistic historical view on the internet. Maybe we can learn from this when looking at blockchain tech today.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago

      Update: to form your own opinion, I'd recommend to also read a response to these accusations published in Input.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago

      A counterweight to the AOTD-winning accusations.

      “Some of it is clearly offensive,” Hill says. “It’s not exempt from criticism.” But Pitcavage notes that this is a very small subset of the 10,000 available apes. “Some look problematic out of context,” he says. “They look less so in the context of all the others.”

      While Ripp's accusations seem to point out factual problems, they are also highly selective. And possibly, they are finding problems where there are none. I didn't background-check the writer, nor do I have personal experience following BAYC. So it's down to watching this polemic from the sidelines. I do find the answers here convincing.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago

      I love the analysis of this simple act: fixing some Google Maps data. What does it actually mean?

      I did the same a few times, once by uploading the first images ever to the listing of a new vegan restaurant in Metz, France that I enjoyed while traveling. I got emails from Google about this single act for years until I disabled them.

      I think I did the restaurant and other people a real service by adding the info. But I also got double feelings from the social vanity metrics attached to Google’s unsolicited emails: trying to socially pressure you to help them more, for free.

      I don’t think gamification or reputation points or similar are bad things. And it’s anyone’s choice to participate in the systems they want to: clearly, many “Local Guides” enjoy this. But it is good to question which parties you’re actually supporting with your online actions, whether tweeting or fixing a Google Maps issue.

      I don’t agree with the sentiment that only big commercial tech companies can provide valuable maps. They logically only care about the average use case that gets them the most money. Apple only added cycling support recently.

      On some of my past cycle touring trips through Europe, the detail in OpenStreetMap data for buildings, road types, regional cycling networks and camping locations has been invaluable and unparalleled in mainstream commercial maps. I’ve worked with the Belgian Open Street Map community members at open Summer of Code too, where there are often projects for map data and routing algorithms that address special needs, for example, give the best route for people in a wheelchair. These are things Google or Bing won’t care about since it doesn’t make sense for them commercially, or because it’s too niche.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago

      Damn, that sucks! Not easy being a writer online. Who do you turn to when you notice a site that only plagiarizes your content? I guess it would take a lot of effort to force a host to take such a site down.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago

      Daniel could've invented Readup! Preach.

      Everyone wants to be the one subscription people choose to pay for. People simply don’t want to pay for multiple music or video streaming services, and they don’t want to pay for multiple news sources. Zero-sum economics require every other player to fail for one to succeed.

      The music streaming comparison is one we've often been drawn to. But there is at least this important difference: music streaming services have achieved incredible coverage. There’s good chance that you just need one music streaming service for all your needs. And there can co-exist various players in the industry, as happens now. They differentiate on pricing/features/ecosystem/…

      There have been various bundling attempts in news or written media, but non of them are as ambitious or successful as Spotify was when it launched music streaming afaik. Not even Apple News.

      Creating the missing article payment infrastructure for the web is one goal of Readup.

      Re: Scroll. Twitter acquired Scroll and integrated it into Twitter Blue recently. But I believe it has only made premium articles available via Twitter I believe, which is a very sub-optimal "free” news environment. Thereby they axed the loved Scroll feature of just going to the publisher’s sites directly. I might be wrong here.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago
      IGN Nordic1/28/2218 min
      IGN Nordic

      Pokémon is a significant franchise, and it’s good that it finally gets a significant rework! Too bad about the alleged dullness & repetitiveness. Hopefully the next iteration will improve this. I’ve been getting back into games a little after largely neglecting them in my late teens and early twenties. It seems that nostalgia is a big driver in the production (and purchase behavior?) in the industry - but recreating the same thing over and over again feels pointless. It’s good when things change. I’ve had some fun recently with Monster Hunter Rise, which beautifully expanded on the edition I played when I was ~12 🙂

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago
      The New YorkerJohn Seabrook12/26/9363 min
      The New Yorker

      A funny story to read with the lens of today. Much of this seems prophetic, while I do not know how common Gates’ views on the near tech future were at the time.

      The meta-story about John’s first steps into email is great too. What we take for granted today was not normal not so long ago, it it may be good to remember what it was like to use email (over calling) for the first time.

      I wonder how Gates would look back on his statements here. It seems he thought mostly of the rosy aspects of the ”information highway” and our increased connectivity, even when the writer confronted him with counter thoughts. Both the good and bad materialized today.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago
      The New YorkerJohn Seabrook1/22/2239 min
      The New Yorker

      This covers Ford’s launch of electric versions of their popular non-sedan models, and what it means for the (US) car industry. It’s an easygoing, informative read considering several perspectives. I for example didn’t know the growth of SUV & truck weight and size over the years can so clearly be linked to pedestrian fatalities. I’ll be reading more from this writer!

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      read3 months ago
      McSweeney's Internet TendencyLeslie Ylinen3 min
      McSweeney's Internet Tendency
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago
      The New York Times CompanyDANIEL VICTOR1/3/224 min
      The New York Times Company

      This is lovely. I saw this title pass by here before someone introduced the game to me, and I had to look this back up! I guess I’m hooked now, in a safe way. It’s also worth watching Josh Wardle’s talk about his social game experiments at Reddit. The motivation behind them aligns with Readup: adding sensible restrictions to an online system that encourage positive social behavior. With Wardle’s inventions it’s often a time restriction. Readup has a read-restriction.

      Wordle’s simplicity makes me think: what if we built a Readup articleoftheday.com site, with just that? (example domain: probably not gonna spend 2k+ $ on this)

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago

      Eh. Yet another disturbing source of internet pollution.

      I think this has a high likelihood of falling as quickly as it rises, it just isn’t a sustainable model. It reminds me of a podcast documenting the rise and fall of another (more interesting?) game with money involved: HQ Trivia - big recommendation!

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago

      I hope they find a way through and out this (I suppose) mostly mental challenge!

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented3 months ago

      I’m yet to see this one! But it’s hard to forget the Let It Go hype. Movies like this, with carefully translated songs, would be good to learn languages I suppose. What if bilingual kids get to see a movie in both languages? Also good that Disney is trying to stay true to cultures more, and be more aware about diversity.

    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      scouted3 months ago
    • thorgalle
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      commented4 months ago

      A kayak rescue operation to save someone from a car. Interesting!