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    • The New Yorker | Brooke Jarvis | 5/18/20 | 14 min
      11 reads5 comments
      9.8
      The New Yorker
      11 reads
      9.8
      sjwoo3 days ago

      Definitely slot this in the "what the hell?" files -- really, really interesting.

    • The New York Times Company | Jonathan Safran Foer | 5/21/20 | 8 min
      35 reads39 comments
      7.7
      The New York Times Company
      35 reads
      7.7
      sjwoo6 days ago

      I was a die-hard meat eater until I read Yuval Noah Harari's Sapiens. Since reading that book a couple of years ago, I've eaten very little meat. I eat plenty of fish and if I'm stuck with horrible choices, I'll eat the very occasional chicken or turkey (haven't had beef in a couple of years).

      If you haven't had an Impossible Burger, you're missing out! Very meaty, but without the grease. That's what I miss the least when I come into contact with meat nowadays -- it all tastes super fatty and greasy.

    • Organizer Sandbox | Jack Shepherd | 5/18/20 | 2 min
      2 reads2 comments
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      Organizer Sandbox
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      sjwoo1 week ago

      I hope this brings a little joy to all Readuppers. It certainly brought me some.

    • The Paris Review | Sabrina Orah Mark | 5/7/20 | 9 min
      72 reads17 comments
      9.2
      The Paris Review
      72 reads
      9.2
      sjwoo1 week ago

      I haven't smiled this much in a long time. Thank you.

    • The New Yorker | George Saunders | 4/3/20 | 5 min
      6 reads3 comments
      10
      The New Yorker
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      sjwoo1 week ago
    • WIRED UK | Sirin Kale | 20 min
      52 reads13 comments
      8.1
      WIRED UK
      52 reads
      8.1
      sjwoo2 weeks ago

      I know I shouldn't be surprised that people still find new ways to make money, but I am...always.

    • film.avclub.com | Ignatiy Vishnevetsky | 5/7/20 | 17 min
      4 reads5 comments
      9.8
      film.avclub.com
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      sjwoo3 weeks ago

      From one of my favorite movie critics -- one who doesn't suffer fools gladly and has never met a bad movie he didn't relish in destroying -- comes an essay about an old video store that's so imbued with nostalgia that I dearly wish I could visit it. It may be gone, but it certainly isn't forgotten.

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 6/19/19 | 34 min
      16 reads7 comments
      9.1
      The Verge
      16 reads
      9.1
      sjwoo3 weeks ago

      After reading just the descriptions of these videos, I'm shellshocked. I can't even imagine having to watch them. These poor workers -- there's so much suffering in this world...

    • Longreads | 12/31/19 | 26 min
      8 reads3 comments
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      Longreads
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      sjwoo3 weeks ago
    • The New York Times Company | Gabrielle Hamilton | 4/23/20 | 31 min
      22 reads17 comments
      9.9
      The New York Times Company
      22 reads
      9.9
      sjwoo1 month ago

      Holy cow, is this ever just the most moving thing. You can just feel all of it -- her frustration, her disdain, her fury, her desperation -- and most of all, her love.

      What breaks my heart the most is that what she's pining for, she lost a long time ago. The city will return to life, but her city will never come back. For her sake, I hope she gets the hell out of there and starts fresh somewhere else, somewhere far away from NYC where she'll have more space, less rent, where she can once again recapture the very reason why she started cooking at a restaurant for diners. Not guests. Diners.

    • Organizer Sandbox | Bill Loundy | 4/21/20 | 6 min
      46 reads28 comments
      8.4
      Organizer Sandbox
      46 reads
      8.4
      sjwoo1 month ago

      I hate those little red dots. I can’t resist clearing them. (And, frankly, I find it utterly impossible to relate to people who don’t mind having little red dots all over the place.)

      You and me both, brother, you and me both. I guess the right response is to say...welcome back. Though I don't know, now I feel like I should take your place or something.

    • The Guardian | Rebecca Solnit | 4/7/20 | 20 min
      14 reads9 comments
      9.7
      The Guardian
      14 reads
      9.7
      sjwoo1 month ago

      After reading the devastating George Packer article yesterday, it felt very good to read something a bit more positive! :)

    • The Atlantic | George Packer | 4/20/20 | 15 min
      21 reads16 comments
      9.4
      The Atlantic
      21 reads
      9.4
      sjwoo1 month ago

      If I could give this article a rating of 100, I would. It's such an impassioned essay and yet it's so completely controlled. Crying while reading a political essay is something I never thought would happen to me, but this one...

      "Russia, Taiwan, and the United Nations sent humanitarian aid to the world’s richest power—a beggar nation in utter chaos."

      Truth hurts -- it hurts so much that it kills.

    • billloundy.substack.com | Bill Loundy | 4/19/20 | 12 min
      24 reads16 comments
      10
      billloundy.substack.com
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      sjwoo1 month ago
    • The New York Times Company | JASMINE JAKSIC | 5/27/16 | 9 min
      27 reads16 comments
      9.2
      The New York Times Company
      27 reads
      9.2
      sjwoo1 month ago

      Thank you for suggesting this. What a lovely, pleasant read, just what we need! And it really hit the geek spot in my heart, too. :)

    • WIRED | Sandra Upson | 4/15/20 | 39 min
      14 reads9 comments
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      WIRED
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      sjwoo1 month ago

      No doubt this is a dumb theory, but sometimes I think there are people who are so super smart that they kind of wear themselves out. Burning both ends of the candle, if you will.

      But that's neither here nor there. He's lived the only way he knows how. It's a shame his life has ended up this way, but he certainly contributed amazing things to the world.

    • The New York Times Company | Cathy Park Hong | 4/12/20 | 15 min
      21 reads8 comments
      8.7
      The New York Times Company
      21 reads
      8.7
      sjwoo1 month ago

      You know, I came to this country from South Korea almost forty years ago. I wasn't yet technically a teenager, as I was a few months shy of turning ten. In all that time, one thought has never occurred to me until, well, 2016 (can you guess the timing?): that USA may not be my final destination. That like my parents before me, I may be going somewhere else to live out the rest of my days.

      It's a very sad thought. I hope I'm wrong.

      For nonwhites, these last four years have been more than just unpleasant -- they've been unsafe.

    • The Atlantic | Nadia Schadlow | 4/5/20 | 7 min
      30 reads12 comments
      8.8
      The Atlantic
      30 reads
      8.8
      sjwoo1 month ago

      Yes, China is bad. They've been bad for a long while.

      The problem is, Trump is just as bad. And now, because the two superpowers of this planet are both pretty terrible, even worse things are happening.

      I certainly have no panacea for this. So somebody a lot smarter than Trump needs to take this on.

    • The Guardian | John Naughton | 1/20/19 | 23 min
      11 reads10 comments
      9.1
      The Guardian
      11 reads
      9.1
      sjwoo1 month ago

      Like they say about substance abuse problems, admitting it is the first step. Perhaps now something can be done about this, but I have to tell you, I don't have much faith that anything will be done. The tech giants are too good at what they do, and they are very much our lifeblood at this point, especially during this pandemic. Collection of location data will become even more paramount going forward.

      My favorite part of Zuboff's theory here is equating us as the natives and the tech giants as colonialists. The parallel is apt, scarily so. We all know what happened to the natives. I fear the same fate awaits us all.

    • Organizer Sandbox | Dr. Eugene K. Choi | 3/19/20 | 10 min
      28 reads12 comments
      9.5
      Organizer Sandbox
      28 reads
      9.5
      sjwoo1 month ago
    • The New York Times Company | NELLIE BOWLES | 3/31/20 | 7 min
      19 reads15 comments
      9.4
      The New York Times Company
      19 reads
      9.4
      sjwoo1 month ago

      "All your base are belong to us," as the popular meme goes. It's a losing battle -- instead of limiting screentime, parents would be better served by having different kind of screentime (constructive, humorous, gaming, etc.).

      Worth reading for the sad chuckles: Report: 90% Of Waking Hours Spent Staring At Glowing Rectangles https://www.theonion.com/report-90-of-waking-hours-spent-staring-at-glowing-re-1819570829

    • The New York Times Company | Brit Marling | 2/7/20 | 11 min
      21 reads19 comments
      9.0
      The New York Times Company
      21 reads
      9.0
      sjwoo3 months ago

      To bring this back to Marling's chosen profession -- the best way to break out of this box is to have more female directors and writers. I just re-watched The Savages last night, starring Laura Linney, written and directed by Tamara Jenkins. Linney wasn't the strong female lead. She was the lead, period, and she was more than enough; in fact, she was perfect in all of her imperfections.

    • The New York Times Company | Dan Brooks | 1/29/20 | 6 min
      31 reads16 comments
      8.9
      The New York Times Company
      31 reads
      8.9
      sjwoo3 months ago

      I feel old.

    • The Hustle | 1/25/20 | 9 min
      30 reads19 comments
      7.8
      The Hustle
      30 reads
      7.8
      sjwoo3 months ago

      “There are people who go to a buffet and eat for 3 or 4 hours straight”

      Goodness...I think I'm gonna be sick...!

    • Outside Online | Rowan Jacobsen | 1/10/19 | 17 min
      20 reads8 comments
      9.4
      Outside Online
      20 reads
      9.4
      sjwoo5 months ago

      Reminds me of Sleeper...

      Dr. Melik: This morning for breakfast he requested something called "wheat germ, organic honey and tiger's milk." Dr. Aragon: [chuckling] Oh, yes. Those are the charmed substances that some years ago were thought to contain life-preserving properties. Dr. Melik: You mean there was no deep fat? No steak or cream pies or... hot fudge? Dr. Aragon: Those were thought to be unhealthy... precisely the opposite of what we now know to be true.

    • theringer.com | Alan Siegel | 12/11/19 | 43 min
      4 reads2 comments
      9.7
      theringer.com
      4 reads
      9.7
      sjwoo5 months ago

      Who knew that there was an actual Marvel-ous Mr. Maisel?

    • The New Yorker | Michael Chabon | 11/11/19 | 21 min
      6 reads6 comments
      10
      The New Yorker
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      sjwoo6 months ago

      As someone who has seen every mentioned episode probably a dozen times, this was especially meaningful.

    • The Outline | Robert Silverman | 11/13/19 | 7 min
      9 reads10 comments
      9.5
      The Outline
      9 reads
      9.5
      sjwoo6 months ago

      No doubt that the streaming wars have just commenced and will end up with some form of massive consolidation. My guess is that it'll take about a decade. Disney+ will become Disney^3 and gobble up a bunch of them.

      I also think that we'll see a reverse -- kind of like what happened with BoJack Horseman, that it's a Netflix show that ended up showing on Comedy Central. Wouldn't it be a hoot if Netflix showed up as a channel at some point in the future? And it'll be a "curated continuous stream" -- which, if you think about it, is what cable is.

      I agree with this writer 100% -- as TV got smarter, it got to be a job to watch. That really is what it feels like now, when somebody tells you to watch The Americans. I mean not only do you have to go through years of shows, but the mental and psychological effort required to watch the show (like you absolutely have to watch it, you can't be folding laundry or cooking up pasta with it in the background) is a significant barrier. Better to just watch a rerun of Friends or Frasier. No wonder at all why those shows are so sought after, multitask TV at its finest.

    • Vice | Allie Conti | 10/31/19 | 31 min
      14 reads6 comments
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      Vice
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      sjwoo6 months ago

      With the Halloween murders that happened in a California Airbnb a week ago, this company really has its work cut out for them.

      We're really seeing the darker side of tech now, aren't we? Facebook, Airbnb, Uber...they're all teenagers that require supervision, except there just isn't any. :(

    • The New York Times Company | Brian Morton | 1/8/19 | 7 min
      13 reads6 comments
      9.6
      The New York Times Company
      13 reads
      9.6
      sjwoo9 months ago

      If you've never read Brian Morton's novels, I'd recommend them highly. Starting Out in the Evening was made into a fine movie, too, starring Frank Langella. You can't go wrong with that one, A Window Across the River, or Florence Gordon, or any of them, really. They're all gems. (Full disclosure: I know Brian to some degree! He taught at NYU when I was there, though I never took any workshops with him. He was kind enough to blurb my book, though.)

    • sjwoo1 year ago

      How fantastic! Just gotta get the word out...always easier said than done, unfortunately. Keep up the great work, guys.

    • blog.reallyread.it | 1/4/18 | 1 min
      35 reads16 comments
      8.0
      blog.reallyread.it
      35 reads
      8.0
      sjwoo2 years ago

      Late to the party but I'd like to add my "hooray!" to this great bit of news -- I use the reddit app more than the website, so this is wonderful news. :)

    • The New York Times Company | Sung J. Woo | 1/5/18 | 6 min
      11 reads9 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      sjwoo2 years ago

      Well, this is one of those very rare times where I, a user of reallyread.it, is sharing a story that I wrote! Yes, I am the writer of this essay. Hope you all enjoy it.

    • WIRED | WIRED Staff | 8/24/17 | 15 min
      27 reads12 comments
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      WIRED
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      sjwoo2 years ago

      This is one of these stories that I wish I could remember when things are not going well. No matter how much I think my life might suck, I need to remember there are people who are in far, far worse circumstances (like anybody in Houston right now, for example).

      5% two-year survival rate for 4th stage pancreatic cancer are really terrible odds, but that still means 5 out of 100 people do make it. I dearly hope Matt Bencke is one of them.

    • National Archives | 11/4/15 | 25 min
      5 reads13 comments
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      National Archives
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      sjwoo2 years ago

      My goodness, I feel like I'm back in high school...or maybe even junior high? I do remember having to read this thing from start to finish, but it's been many, many decades.

      I'd completely forgotten how little is written for executive and judicial. Judicial is so tiny...no mention of the # of Supreme Court justices or anything really specific about the Supreme Court. I guess it could be just one justice...

      The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one third may be chosen every second Year

      Didn't know this. So in every midterm election, 1/3 of the senators are up for re-election. That makes good sense.

      The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.

      Why is the place of choosing U.S. Senators not governed by the states? I guess that means we could have senatorial elections in one place and everything else in another? Strange.

      To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years

      I didn't know about this, either. So money for armed services can only be used for two years? So I guess Congress has to re-appropriate funds for wars that last more than two years.

      This was a highly interesting reading, Bill! As far as Article VII is concerned, check this out: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110831174022AAVJ47D

    • The Guardian | Carey Dunne | 5/22/17 | 20 min
      15 reads11 comments
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      The Guardian
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      sjwoo2 years ago

      I think we can distill this article with these statements:

      || Tammi isn’t a caricature of a tinfoil hat-wearing conspiracist, and she’s not an idiot.

      “How does someone like me know what’s true and what’s not?”

      “This is something I truly believe: the news only broadcasts what they want the public to know,” Rob says. “They’re not gonna broadcast the full truth about anything, ever.” ||

      Maybe Tammi is not an idiot, but somebody who is unable (and unwilling, from what it seems) to distinguish between truth and fiction is pretty close to being one. And Rob is a classic conspiracy theorist.

      I hadn't even heard of chemtrails until reading this. Sounds like a variant of anti-vaxxers. Lots of them out there. This is the world we live in, folks...better get used to it.

    • The New York Times Company | Jay Caspian Kang | 8/9/17 | 42 min
      3 reads2 comments
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      The New York Times Company
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      sjwoo2 years ago

      If this story sounds a lot like one that was recently in the news, that's because it basically is...a bunch of fraternity brothers placed a pledge in physical distress and brought him medical help way too late to save his life. How sad is it that the same tragedy happens over and over again...

      I'm a Korean American who joined a fraternity back in my undergrad days at Cornell, though not an Asian one. I never saw a reason to do that, because I'd always felt that the point of college was to meet as many different people as possible. This is not to disparage anyone who does want to take a deep dive into their culture during college -- it is nothing more than a highly subjective and personal decision on my part.

      As someone who did partake in the Greek system and found a lot of joy in it, I would never dissuade anyone from joining themselves, though reading stories like this should give any Greek-interested students pause. Hazing is one of those things that just doesn't work in any capacity, and perhaps worst in group/crowd situations.

    • The American Scholar | William Deresiewicz | 6/1/08 | 30 min
      21 reads25 comments
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      The American Scholar
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      sjwoo2 years ago

      True that elite universities produced John Kerry and W...but they also produced Gates, Brin/Page, Zuckerberg...Windows, Google, Facebook. [I'd put Jobs/Reed College/Apple in the mix, too.] Certainly these "elites" knew something about the "unwashed masses" -- otherwise, how could they have created entities with such broad-based appeal/application?

      This essay is the very definition of cherry-picking. And one that speaks not so much about the narrowness of elite education but the narrowness of the life led by writer himself. There are students who attend Ivy League schools from families that barely scrape by...I should know, because I was one of those students.

      In my current job, I work with a guy who never went to college and is one of the brightest associates in my department. It took me about a week to figure that out, and another week to leverage his knowledge to get our project done in record time. Contrary to what Deresiewicz writes here, it is very possible for elites and non-elites to work together.