1. Join Readup to read with sjwoo.

    sjwoo
    Scribe
    4 followers
    • The New York Times Company | Kashmir Hill | 7/31/20 | 6 min
      28 reads15 comments
      9.5
      The New York Times Company
      28 reads
      9.5
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 days ago

      You could block Microsoft from your life, if you did not work. But if you work for a corporation? Good luck with that.

      As an Android person, Apple is pretty much self-blocked already with almost no consequence. Facebook could go as well, except I would absolutely lose touch with many people. I could live without Amazon, too, but it would be hugely inconvenient.

      For me, Google is the only really indispensable entity. But of course, this is all because we do want convenience.

      You could almost make an argument that the greatest threat to humanity is convenience.

    • blog.codinghorror.com | 4 min
      45 reads18 comments
      9.2
      blog.codinghorror.com
      45 reads
      9.2
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 week ago

      Go to: https://trycf.com/

      Copy and paste: <cfloop index="i" from="1" to="100"> <cfoutput>#i#</cfoutput> <cfif i mod 3 eq 0 and i mod 5 eq 0>FizzBuzz <cfelseif i mod 3 eq 0>Fizz <cfelseif i mod 5 eq 0>Buzz </cfif> <br> </cfloop>

      :)

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 10/6/16 | 26 min
      7 reads6 comments
      9.9
      The Verge
      7 reads
      9.9
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 week ago

      I guess it was just a matter of time until an episode of Black Mirror became reality. If you haven't seen the episode mentioned in the article, you absolutely should -- it's one of the best.

      No doubt there will be money in this -- I used a "shoebox scan" service many years back to have my shoebox full of photographs scanned into files by a machine. It's not hard to fathom a similar service in the future where you can feed someone's texts, emails, and photos to a server and have it crank them out. You could even have a party-type of chat with all of your dead friends together. Then after you're dead, you can join the neverending conversation, the machine talking to itself.

      As far as the writer wanting to talk to a younger, more optimistic version of Mazurenko, that can be easily done since just about all communication is timestamped. So you should be able to ask for Joe Schmoe at 21.

      I can't say I'm for it or against it; doesn't matter, as it's bound to happen. Too much money for it not to.

    • fs.blog | 8/11/15 | 10 min
      15 reads11 comments
      8.7
      fs.blog
      15 reads
      8.7
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 week ago

      I never knew of Schopenhauer until I read Jonathan Franzen's The Corrections, which references him quite a bit.

      Lately I'm getting a bad feeling that podcasts are really hindering my thought processes. I used to think about all sorts of things while doing the mundane (folding laundry, taking a shower), but now podcasts have invaded my brain. They're like fast food for the mind...

    • The New Yorker | Masha Gessen | 7/21/20 | 6 min
      28 reads6 comments
      9.3
      The New Yorker
      28 reads
      9.3
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 weeks ago

      If Trump loses and leaves, 99.9% likelihood he'll leave a steaming pile of poop on the Oval Desk.

    • bellingcat | 7/20/20 | 25 min
      11 reads4 comments
      9.6
      bellingcat
      11 reads
      9.6
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 weeks ago
    • Lithub | Sung J. Woo | 7/14/20 | 9 min
      0 reads1 comment
      10
      Lithub
      0 reads
      10
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 weeks ago

      I wrote this a while back, and it was published a week ago, but I just found out about it today. It's an essay on how woefully prepared I was in writing a mystery novel.

      Which comes out today, my third novel. Hooray! Nothing like publishing a book during a pandemic...

    • taibbi.substack.com | Matt Taibbi | 7/20/20 | 17 min
      18 reads6 comments
      8.2
      taibbi.substack.com
      18 reads
      8.2
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 weeks ago

      Honestly, at this point, I've never been more envious of Henry David Thoreau. No wonder he just got the hell out of dodge.

      Does the term "political correctness" even exist anymore? I never hear it. It seems like it's been superseded by many of its uglier and sneakier spawns...

    • bariweiss.com | 8 min
      35 reads21 comments
      8.3
      bariweiss.com
      35 reads
      8.3
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      4 weeks ago

      But the truth is that intellectual curiosity—let alone risk-taking—is now a liability at The Times.

      If a newspaper is a reflection of the world, then the Times is accurately reflecting the times. This is the state we live in now, and it'll most likely take some sort of a revolution to stop it. Sorry, Bari. But I'm not too worried for your future, and I'm sure you aren't, either. I have no doubt you'll land quite nicely on your feet.

      It's all rather tiring, if I can be honest. To quote Danny Glover from Lethal Weapon, "I'm too old for this shit."

    • sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      It wouldn't surprise me in the least if this was many people's favorite story of Murakami's. It certainly is one of mine. I read everything he wrote up to Kafka on the Shore. After that I've found him a bit repetitive, but lord, if you've never read Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, are you in for a treat.

      My favorite story of his is "Barn Burning," which I read in The New Yorker back in the fall of 1992, at my college library. I not only remember that story, but I remember reading it, where I sat, the light in that vast reading room, my utter absorption as I got to the last page, the last sentence, the last word -- and then feeling the shiver down my spine as realization set in.

      It was made into a movie a couple of years ago, but that story -- it's the real goods. And only that version in the magazine, translated by Philip Gabriel. The one that's in the collection The Elephant Vanishes is translated by Alfred Birnbaum and not nearly as good. In fact, the endings are different enough that I wonder if the source material changed...

    • zero hedge | 12 min
      16 reads10 comments
      9.0
      zero hedge
      16 reads
      9.0
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Zero Hedge! This website used to actually be somewhat decent, but it has unfortunately devolved into a repository of right-wing nutjobs.

      Two links worth mentioning:

      1. https://www.theonion.com/recession-plagued-nation-demands-new-bubble-to-invest-i-1819569940

      2. If you really want to understand what money is and how it functions, check out Philosophical Economics:

      http://www.philosophicaleconomics.com/2013/05/the-meaning-of-money/

      PE actually wrote a very good piece on the gold standard (and the lack of need for it): http://www.philosophicaleconomics.com/2014/07/goldstandard/

      I personally have never understood the reason for gold's value. It actually has very little intrinsic value -- I think it's used in some electronics, and I guess there's some value in being flaked into the bottom of Goldschlager; it's just something humans have agreed that it has value. Bitcoin is a better imaginary store of value, but not enough people believe in it. Not yet, at least, which is why it's so volatile.

      The idea that a return to the gold standard would suddenly solve all of our economic problems is ridiculous. It would cause a worldwide depression. The fiat genie has been let out of the bottle; there is no turning back.

      1. Update (7/11/2020):

        Worth mentioning -- when I suggest the return to the gold standard would cause mass chaos, what I really mean is gold standard = actual monetary limitation/containment. If you do end up reading the PE gold standard article, you'll see this:

        The second misconception pertains to the idea that US financial system was somehow on a gold standard after 1933. It was not. The gold standard ended in the Spring of 1933, when FDR issued executive order 6102. This order made it illegal for individuals within the continental United States to own gold. If gold can’t be legally owned, then it can’t be legally redeemed. If it can’t be legally redeemed, then it can’t constrain the central bank.

    • Telegraph | Ken Liu | 7/10/20 | 5 min
      4 reads3 comments
      9.3
      Telegraph
      4 reads
      9.3
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      I copied and pasted this very short story from the original site because it uses javascript and makes it funky to read (and I couldn't get it to read to completion on ReadUp). So I watched this movie last night called The Truth, and it's about an aging movie star and her daughter. It's a French film (with some English, thanks to the ever delightful Ethan Hawke), and the movie within the movie is this short story. It's a gem. (Both the movie and this story!)

    • Locus Online | 7/6/20 | 8 min
      21 reads14 comments
      8.5
      Locus Online
      21 reads
      8.5
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      I look forward to the days ahead when we again have people as smart as Doctorow help run the government.

      He's 100% right. If you think about all the gains we've made through all the tech innovations (IC engine, computers, smartphones), we're still just as busy as ever, if not more so. The blue-collared class have been decimated, but that's a phase and they'll die out (sorry to be so blunt, but it's true). Even the dumb kids nowadays can use tech to a decent degree, and for those who still would rather have a physical-labor-intensive job, like Doctorow says, there will be plenty of that through the natural catastrophes we've created.

      That hole digging and filling metaphor is quite apt. You could make an argument that this is all human beings have been doing since the dawn of time.

    • Vox | Aja Romano | 12/30/19 | 16 min
      13 reads8 comments
      8.2
      Vox
      13 reads
      8.2
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Social media birthed cancel culture, of course. No way it could've ever happened without it. You simply couldn't gather a large enough mob in the old days to move the needle of famous people.

      The more I think about it, the more I believe social networks aren't the future. Tech is all about fixing problems of existing infrastructure, and someone will come along with something better. At least that's my hope, anyway.

    • The New Yorker | Ferris Jabr | 9/3/14 | 7 min
      20 reads13 comments
      9.7
      The New Yorker
      20 reads
      9.7
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Stephen King's novel (under the pseudonym Richard Bachman) The Long Walk is one of my favorites. :)

    • The New York Times Company | NELLIE BOWLES | 4/24/20 | 11 min
      14 reads8 comments
      8.8
      The New York Times Company
      14 reads
      8.8
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      For some reason I thought this article would be about preppies...! For a good minute or so, I was wondering why there weren't any photos of people in Polo shirts with their collars popped.

      If the world requires survivalists for survival, then no thanks, I'll just head for the exit. Life is hard enough as it is.

    • The Atlantic | Megan McArdle | 12/2/11 | 7 min
      32 reads6 comments
      8.1
      The Atlantic
      32 reads
      8.1
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Reminds me of a headline in one of the NY tabloids many years ago when a baseball manager for one of the teams did nothing special but the team won anyway:

      "FROM BOZO TO EINSTEIN"

    • SAPIENS | Karen L. Kramer | 6/9/20 | 9 min
      19 reads8 comments
      9.3
      SAPIENS
      19 reads
      9.3
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Really interesting -- I love the caloric breakdown that leads to these conclusions. No doubt we rule the planet. When the new Tappan Zee Bridge was being built, I remember driving through and seeing these massive structures and thinking, "Humans are making this." We're amazing. Amazingly clever. Let's just hope our collective cleverness keeps it all going for a good while longer.

    • Alexa Rohn | Alexa Rohn | 11/4/19 | 9 min
      24 reads10 comments
      9.8
      Alexa Rohn
      24 reads
      9.8
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Deep reading for the win.

    • washingtonpost | 10/16/19 | 21 min
      9 reads6 comments
      9.6
      washingtonpost
      9 reads
      9.6
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      I can actually say that I have felt this very heat -- I visited Doha almost ten years ago. No doubt it was slightly cooler then, but it still felt like I was walking in an oven. It is a strange place -- never have I felt more like a foreigner than in that city.

      The future: https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/gadgets/a22927/diy-air-conditioned-suit/

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 6/15/20 | 8 min
      22 reads9 comments
      8.1
      The Verge
      22 reads
      8.1
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      With a $99-a-year price tag

      Nope.

      second labeled “reply later.”

      I see a future where vast swaths of emails receive this label and are never seen again.

    • jsomers.net | James Somers | 5 min
      39 reads11 comments
      9.5
      jsomers.net
      39 reads
      9.5
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      It's a muscle like anything else, though I have to say, as I get older, it is absolutely more difficult to get anything done faster. Now it's entirely possible that my brain and my body are indeed slowing down -- in fact, I'm sure they are both happening. But more than that, it's motivation -- I just don't have what I used to. That, more than anything, I believe is the reason why we slow down as we age.

    • jezebel.com | Brandy Jensen | 5/7/20 | 4 min
      45 reads18 comments
      8.6
      jezebel.com
      45 reads
      8.6
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Why are we here? What are we doing? Does anything really matter?

      All we can ever do is create meaning in our lives, because the bigger meaning will forever elude us (highly, highly likely that it doesn't exist). One of my favorite quotes of all time is by Douglas Adams:

      “There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There is another theory which states that this has already happened.”

    • City Journal | 4/17/20 | 19 min
      13 reads4 comments
      10
      City Journal
      13 reads
      10
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      1 month ago

      Quite the primer on Thiel. I'm still not sure whether this guy is good or bad for the world. I'm reminded of the Seinfeld episode where the gang talks about Woody Woodpecker -- "What is he, an instigator?" "That's right, he's a troublemaker."

    • The Atlantic | Rebecca Carroll | 6/3/20 | 5 min
      46 reads7 comments
      9.6
      The Atlantic
      46 reads
      9.6
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago

      The year 2020, before it got here, seemed so futuristic, so full of promise.

      Boy, was I ever wrong. 2020 has shaped into a year nobody will ever want to remember. And yet remember we must, because, as the saying goes, those who don't remember history are doomed to repeat it. Let's never forget any of this, ever.

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 6/5/20 | 4 min
      17 reads7 comments
      10
      blog.readup.com
      17 reads
      10
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago
    • Medium | Barack Obama | 6/1/20 | 5 min
      37 reads7 comments
      9.8
      Medium
      37 reads
      9.8
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago

      Please come back, Barack...please...

    • protocol | David Pierce | 5/27/20 | 14 min
      22 reads4 comments
      7.8
      protocol
      22 reads
      7.8
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago

      Yes, reddit being reddit...a reflection of the internet, where things can be as wonderful as they are terrible.

    • The New Yorker | Brooke Jarvis | 5/18/20 | 14 min
      12 reads6 comments
      9.8
      The New Yorker
      12 reads
      9.8
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago

      Definitely slot this in the "what the hell?" files -- really, really interesting.

    • The New York Times Company | Jonathan Safran Foer | 5/21/20 | 8 min
      36 reads39 comments
      7.7
      The New York Times Company
      36 reads
      7.7
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago

      I was a die-hard meat eater until I read Yuval Noah Harari's Sapiens. Since reading that book a couple of years ago, I've eaten very little meat. I eat plenty of fish and if I'm stuck with horrible choices, I'll eat the very occasional chicken or turkey (haven't had beef in a couple of years).

      If you haven't had an Impossible Burger, you're missing out! Very meaty, but without the grease. That's what I miss the least when I come into contact with meat nowadays -- it all tastes super fatty and greasy.

    • Medium | Jack Shepherd | 5/18/20 | 2 min
      2 reads2 comments
      10
      Medium
      2 reads
      10
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago

      I hope this brings a little joy to all Readuppers. It certainly brought me some.

    • The Paris Review | Sabrina Orah Mark | 5/7/20 | 9 min
      73 reads17 comments
      9.2
      The Paris Review
      73 reads
      9.2
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago

      I haven't smiled this much in a long time. Thank you.

    • The New Yorker | George Saunders | 4/3/20 | 5 min
      6 reads3 comments
      10
      The New Yorker
      6 reads
      10
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      2 months ago
    • WIRED UK | Sirin Kale | 20 min
      54 reads13 comments
      8.1
      WIRED UK
      54 reads
      8.1
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 months ago

      I know I shouldn't be surprised that people still find new ways to make money, but I am...always.

    • film.avclub.com | Ignatiy Vishnevetsky | 5/7/20 | 17 min
      4 reads5 comments
      9.8
      film.avclub.com
      4 reads
      9.8
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 months ago

      From one of my favorite movie critics -- one who doesn't suffer fools gladly and has never met a bad movie he didn't relish in destroying -- comes an essay about an old video store that's so imbued with nostalgia that I dearly wish I could visit it. It may be gone, but it certainly isn't forgotten.

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 6/19/19 | 34 min
      16 reads7 comments
      9.1
      The Verge
      16 reads
      9.1
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 months ago

      After reading just the descriptions of these videos, I'm shellshocked. I can't even imagine having to watch them. These poor workers -- there's so much suffering in this world...

    • Longreads | 12/31/19 | 26 min
      9 reads3 comments
      10
      Longreads
      9 reads
      10
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 months ago
    • The New York Times Company | Gabrielle Hamilton | 4/23/20 | 31 min
      22 reads17 comments
      9.9
      The New York Times Company
      22 reads
      9.9
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 months ago

      Holy cow, is this ever just the most moving thing. You can just feel all of it -- her frustration, her disdain, her fury, her desperation -- and most of all, her love.

      What breaks my heart the most is that what she's pining for, she lost a long time ago. The city will return to life, but her city will never come back. For her sake, I hope she gets the hell out of there and starts fresh somewhere else, somewhere far away from NYC where she'll have more space, less rent, where she can once again recapture the very reason why she started cooking at a restaurant for diners. Not guests. Diners.

    • Medium | Bill Loundy | 4/21/20 | 6 min
      46 reads28 comments
      8.4
      Medium
      46 reads
      8.4
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 months ago

      I hate those little red dots. I can’t resist clearing them. (And, frankly, I find it utterly impossible to relate to people who don’t mind having little red dots all over the place.)

      You and me both, brother, you and me both. I guess the right response is to say...welcome back. Though I don't know, now I feel like I should take your place or something.

    • The Guardian | Rebecca Solnit | 4/7/20 | 20 min
      14 reads9 comments
      9.7
      The Guardian
      14 reads
      9.7
      sjwoo
      Scribe
      3 months ago

      After reading the devastating George Packer article yesterday, it felt very good to read something a bit more positive! :)