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    • The New York Times Company | Margaret Renkl | 8/31/20 | 6 min
      23 reads13 comments
      9.8
      The New York Times Company
      23 reads
      9.8
      readup4 months ago

      At first the hawk remained in its resting position, but I wish you could have seen what happened to its eyes when it saw that squirrel. Its head turned; I swear I could see its pupils dilate.

    • CNBC | Sam Shead | 7/23/20 | 4 min
      1 read1 comment
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      CNBC
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      readup5 months ago

      OpenAI first described GPT-3 in a research paper published in May. It follows GPT-2, which OpenAI chose not to release widely last year because it thought it was too dangerous. It was concerned that people would use it in malicious ways, including generating fake news and spam in vast quantities.

      ** interesting how they described how the AI GPT-2 was classified as dangerous, and yet GPT-3 at 100X computing capacity, supposedly isn't?

    • The New York Times Company | Maureen Dowd | 11/8/17 | 15 min
      7 reads2 comments
      9.7
      The New York Times Company
      7 reads
      9.7
      readup5 months ago

      we’re living in this time of total opacity where you don’t know why you see the news you see. You don’t know if it’s the same news that someone else sees. You don’t know who made it be that way. You don’t know who’s paid to change what you see. Everything is totally obscure in a profound way that it never was before.

    • The Verge | Casey Newton | 10/6/16 | 26 min
      7 reads6 comments
      9.9
      The Verge
      7 reads
      9.9
      readup5 months ago

      Someday you will die, leaving behind a lifetime of text messages, posts, and other digital ephemera. For a while, your friends and family may put these digital traces out of their minds. But new services will arrive offering to transform them — possibly into something resembling Roman Mazurenko’s bot.

    • Medium | Natali Morad | 9/28/17 | 14 min
      10 reads4 comments
      9.7
      Medium
      10 reads
      9.7
      readup5 months ago

      This happens to us all the time. Think, for example, of a book you reread from high school. While the information is the same (same words, same book), the way you experience and understand the book (and the world!) is fundamentally different. This is transformation.

      To Kill a Mockingbird anyone???

    • Vox | Sean Illing | 5/2/19 | 14 min
      16 reads7 comments
      10
      Vox
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      readup5 months ago

      We don’t merely develop new devices for expressing our emotions — our devices actually alter what emotions we express.

      So important to recognize, that we are at a truly unprecedented time when it comes to our handling of our latest technological devices. Examine the reasons you believe your technology usage alters the way you feel and in what way!

    • Ness Labs | 9/20/19 | 7 min
      10 reads5 comments
      8.4
      Ness Labs
      10 reads
      8.4
      readup5 months ago

      The brain and the mind feel extremely familiar. We do spend lots of our time inside our heads. That’s why it’s easy to disseminate false—but great sounding—information about the brain. This is what a neuromyth is: an erroneous belief about how the brain works that is held by a large number of people.