1. Join Readup to read with bartadamley.

    bartadamley
    ScoutScribe
    11 followers
    • bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      6 hours ago

      Love it, always a practical thing to further evaluate how one can take smarter notes.

      I have embarked on a personal goal, where it is my goal to read 1,000 books before 2032... https://www.bartadamley.com/post/journey-to-1-000

      However, one of my worries is that I may have lost some of these very important ideas I have picked up along the way... as this is a vast amount of information I have ingested.

      So one of my self-assignments is now how to categorize all of these notes I have taken in the past, 'quotes' for the most part and finding a way to categorize within a more a generalized knowledge base. I have quotes for 100+ books that I have left untouched, and now I am going to return back to these.

      Hopefully, I will be able to find some insight along the way! Cheers to better note-taking and preserving our once-lost knowledge.

    • David Perell | 4/11/19 | 37 min
      2 reads1 comment
      10
      David Perell
      2 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      6 hours ago

      So many helpful tips for those considering having a more 'active' writing voice online. It truly has never been easier to find those who are interested in the things that we are... it really just comes down to having that 'creative confidence' and giving it a shot!

      "Your ideas are the most valuable currency in a knowledge-driven economy. Just as an investment account allows your money to grow day and night without your involvement, content does the same with your ideas."

    • Ness Labs | 10/22/19 | 4 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Ness Labs
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      4 days ago

      Goals set far in the future do not provide the daily rush of excitement necessary to keep one’s habits on the long term. There are also usually so many ways to achieve them that people end up changing strategies over and over again without ever racking the benefits of doing one thing well and repeatedly.

      Start small with your goals and build momentum over time.

    • bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      4 days ago

      The challenge is knowing which knowledge is worth acquiring. And then building a system to forward bits of it through time, to the future situation or problem or challenge where it is most applicable, and most needed.

      Yes... so it's like while I am reading this... what do I do with these quotes that stick out to me the most. If I have read something like this before, how do I nudge future me into seeing this again, if I read something like this in the future. How do I spend a little extra time organizing these notes, so I don't have to spend the time later researching from scratch.

      It is a method for opportunistic compression summarizing and condensing a piece of information in small spurts, spread across time, in the course of other work, and only doing as much or as little as the information deserves.

      Building my 'second brain' is an immense undertaking, but as I toe along this line of understanding just how little organization I had previously... frightens me/yet excites me. Utilizing the technologies we have available now, to ensure I can use it as a superpower. Never losing a train of thought/idea that I have had previously, because I do my best to ensure that I #tag my notes for easily searchable terms.

      “How do I make what I’m consuming right now easily discoverable for my future self?”

      For those interested: I definitely recommend using Roam Research for notetaking.

      https://roamresearch.com/

    • superorganizers.substack.com | Nat Eliason | 9/2/20 | 8 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      superorganizers.substack.com
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      4 days ago

      I aspire to have a better way of note-taking for when I read books. The thing that is a struggle, yet also something I greatly cherish is that I handwrite notes after I read a book. This is by utilizing the quotes that struck a chord within, as I attach a sticky note in the front page of the book I am reading.. writing down the page number of where the quotes I found that I enjoyed. Once I turn to that page, I can easily find the quote I enjoyed by looking for quotation marks around a quote, handwritten in pencil.

      Once I find my quote, I export it to my individual notebook... copying it word-for-word. Then I do a response to why I chose that quote.

      And yet I wonder, since this isn't necessarily searchable... if I should double down on my notetaking 'tools' and type these quotes out. hmmmmmm

    • Medium | Jesse Hercules | 9/18/20 | 11 min
      19 reads18 comments
      9.5
      Medium
      19 reads
      9.5
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      5 days ago

      Awesome read. SO important to understand this. It is great to see this as the AOTD. I have been reading over content like this the past 2-3 years, about the inherent unethical nature of free services that repackage our attention and sell it to the highest bidder. It is exciting to see this go more mainstream.

      Additional note: the original sin, although not 'enitrely free' was the inception of the 'penny press' as Newspapers were then sold at a penny a paper. Publications realized that a tremendous amount of money could still be made, just in a new fashion due to ad-space being sold on newspapers.

      I highly recommend Tim Wu's "The Attention Merchants" if you want a more in-depth history on this very important topic!

      https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28503628-the-attention-merchants

    • roambrain.com | 8/5/20 | 14 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      roambrain.com
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      5 days ago

      Roam Research and note-taking are two rabbit holes, I am thankful I am going down.

      I recommend this for anyone looking to get their 'knowledge work' more organized and more cohesive.

      Tools for thought are not only for academics. They are also for those of us whose calling in life is to bring ideas to reality.

      In our day and age of informational glut; it can be incredibly challenging to stay on top of what it is we are seeking to accomplish/research/etc... and tools for thought can act as our 'second brain' to help us get there. Consider this your superpower!

      treat ideas as beings from another realm whose purpose is to manifest themselves in this world. They need a human partner to do this.

      If an idea is top of mind pursue it. Let loose and pour all energy into this thought, especially if it continually comes back. You never know where an idea can lead you, unless you give it the time of day!

    • bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      5 days ago

      Goals without systems are a disaster. Systems without goals is average.

      Combine both- and you will be a superhero.

      Goals are about the results you want to achieve. Systems are about the processes that lead to those results… Goals are good for setting a direction, but systems are best for making progress.”

    • Medium | Jordan Hall | 3/23/18 | 17 min
      5 reads4 comments
      10
      Medium
      5 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      5 days ago
      • perhaps this is the kind of essay where you grab a fresh cup of coffee and settle in...

      Agreed! Definitely recommend a cup of joe for this one.

      Weak affinity environments reward and punish behaviours very differently from strong community environments.

      Important classification was made in this article in describing how social media is creating an environment that cultivates relationships with weak affinities... Whereas compared to our traditional way of conducting our social lives with a basis of strong communities. It is no wonder there is such a strong polarity with our politics, as we can so easily hide/block those with opposite views. There is no chance to understand the context of why that person holds those particular beliefs, and all there is leftover is just an 'ugly' idea because it is one counter from yours.. especially as a good amount of us are working from home, there is that lack of community that was once found as a subpar replacement for a community in a traditional sense. Back to our Filter bubbles we go!

      We need to get our heads around the fact that this kind of relationship,a relationship between humans and AI, is simply novel in our experience and that we cannot rely on any of our instincts, habits, traditions or laws to effectively navigate this new kind of relationship.

      Such a critical quote to understand, with their being a vast asymmetry between users of social media and the AI which operates their news feed. Every little trace of data we leave on social media makes their AI bigger, better, faster and stronger... as they are continually recombining novel data points to maximize your screen time. How do we ever stand a chance against these platforms?

      It is simple. Stop using them!

    • Donald E. Bullers | Donald E. Bullers | 9/9/20 | 3 min
      4 reads4 comments
      9.3
      Donald E. Bullers
      4 reads
      9.3
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      5 days ago

      Who would've thought that paying for social media would be a way better alternative?

      What this means is if a website, or application, is spending its resources to deliver content without asking for anything in return then they are selling information about you to others in order to profit.

    • Om Weekly by Kelly Barrett | 6 min
      5 reads1 comment
      10
      Om Weekly by Kelly Barrett
      5 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      5 days ago
    • NPR.org | Damon Krukowski | 8/19/20 | 14 min
      2 reads1 comment
      9.5
      NPR.org
      2 reads
      9.5
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      6 days ago

      Great introductory piece on Bandcamp highlighting the differences between Spotify and their platform.

      As a listener, I absolutely love Spotify, as there is an abundance of new music/podcasts/etc...

      However, as a musician I have had a tremendously difficult time getting put onto Spotify. It is far less artist-friendly when it comes to getting your music released to a wide-scale audience. So thus far, I have stuck with Soundcloud.

      https://soundcloud.com/bartadamley

      "But what can it mean, when Spotify's royalty rates are so low that to earn a living wage of $15 an hour, a musician needs 657,895 streams per month*?"

      So when Spotify claims that artist can make a living off of their streams.. it is very similar to the way in which Amazon and other various big tech players approach individuals economic value.

      It saddens me that it is that way, and as Spotify increasingly pivots themselves to no longer being a 'music' company but instead an 'audio' company... it'll be interesting to see how a platform dedicated to just 'music' pans out.

      Perhaps giving Bandcamp a shot isn't a bad idea!

    • MIT Technology Review | Tanya Basu | 9/3/20 | 5 min
      2 reads2 comments
      10
      MIT Technology Review
      2 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      6 days ago

      “With blogging, you’re talking to a large audience,” he says. “With digital gardening, you’re talking to yourself. You focus on what you want to cultivate over time.”

    • Medium | Jack Luna | 9/9/20 | 10 min
      22 reads8 comments
      8.7
      Medium
      22 reads
      8.7
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago
    • Forte Labs | 2/25/17 | 17 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Forte Labs
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      The key is to realize that you are not a thing, which can be deformed and broken, but an environment.

      "Ecology of you" - I can already see it as a cliche titled self-help book, but it is an interesting insight. Viewing ourselves as an environment.

      The interesting thing about constraints is that they are never on you. They are constraints on your context ,shaping the space of possibilities you allow yourself to consider.

      Constraints on our context.... is a very interesting way to look into this. One of the most relevant constraints simply being is time. We can only do so much in a certain day, which isn't on us.. it is due to the nature of time. So it is all about how we spend that time, deep-focus preferred, entering those flow-like states versus, incessantly scrolling and not really processing what it is we are spending our time on.

    • Forte Labs | 3/12/17 | 6 min
      1 read1 comment
      9.0
      Forte Labs
      1 read
      9.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      “If you don’t have a good system for storing bad ideas, you probably don’t have one for filing good ones, either.”

      Shoot! Creating a system with more actionable items, to turn our 'hobbies' into the way in which we make a living, in this increasingly turn of the tide age towards freelancers is essential.

      Cheers to Monday Organization!

    • Nat Eliason | 4 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Nat Eliason
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      you definitely shouldn’t plan out week-by-week what you’ll be doing in 2-3 months. Rather, you should have a target (whatever you’re tempted to call a “year goal”), and focus on making the next most important piece of progress on it.

      Productivity.. such a challenging thing to measure for. I think developing 3 areas one wants to focus on, and measuring how those areas are being worked on/improved upon is what I have found to be most effective in my life.

      1. beats
      2. startups
      3. higher-ed

      I always try to frame it in my mind as did I get better than how I was the day before?

      Did I feel I spent some time learning something I didn't know? Did I relax after a stressful week? Questions all along this sort.

    • Forte Labs | 2/20/19 | 19 min
      1 read1 comment
      -
      Forte Labs
      1 read
      -
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      By constantly saving packets of knowledge in a format that our future self can easily consume, we follow a “pay it forward” strategy that we get to benefit from in the future!

      Setting information that we find interesting, or could be helpful later on is a helpful insight. I cannot tell you the amount of times that I have ended up reading something longer-formed, or mindlessly scrolled because at the time it seemed like a more interesting thing. This idea of even if something provoked the slightest amount of curiosity and to pay it forward later.. is brilliant.

      But as you continually curate and save pieces of content, review and summarize them, create a series of intermediate packets, and then recycle them back into your second brain, you’ll start to realize that there is no such thing as a finished product.

      Proposing half-hatched ideas; is better than not proposing ideas at all. Right?

      • Your second brain becomes like a mirror, reflecting back to you who you think you are, who you want to be, and who you could become.

      We have to externalize the amount of information that we engage with in this day-and-age of information saturation. Just to have a breeding ground of re-conceptualized/ cross-pollinated idea... this mirror (our second brain) has infinite potential. It just comes down to our methodologies of expanding on these thoughts/concepts that we would like to further explore.

    • Forte Labs | 6/23/17 | 12 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Forte Labs
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      I believe this is actually the most profound benefit of a portfolio approach to work: it is fundamentally unbounded when it comes to personal growth, creativity, and learning. Changing direction is just a matter of adding or removing an item from your portfolio, not making a dramatic, wrenching career change.

      When we approach freelance work or really just any work in general, we should view it within a frame of a portfolio. As portfolio thinking ensures that we do not specialize in just one field, due to increasing automation and career fragility. So when it comes to our approach to our work, diversify our fields and don't commit to just one project. ALWAYS PROGRESS!

    • David Perell | 5 min
      5 reads1 comment
      8.7
      David Perell
      5 reads
      8.7
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Sharing your work is like inviting friends to your home. It forces you to be clean and double check everything, which accelerates the learning process.

      Sharing. The hardest and yet easiest thing to do creatively.

      When I think personally about the things in which I am passionate about: music, education and tech startups.. I absolutely could be better at sharing. In a way though, that is what we can use the comments for on Readup.

      Speaking of sharing. I will share a link to my first-ever mix I have released on SoundCloud just this Friday. Take a listen and share what it is that you are working on!

      https://soundcloud.com/bartadamley/bartydarty

    • Forte Labs | 11/16/15 | 18 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Forte Labs
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      our daily intake of information is equivalent to 100,000 words, or [174 newspapers] depending on who you ask.

      holy smokes.. this is such a fascinating statistic, it has me curious on how much of this information we engage with that we truly comprehend.

      If you think you can permanently seal off your life from the celebrity news, content marketing, and spammy friends that dominate the web, the NSA has a job for you.

      Comical, but true. Makes you think of the true vitality of a "Save it Later" or "starred" list in Readup's case ;)

      If no paradigm is right, you can choose whatever one will help to achieve your purpose.

      Distinguishing the signal from the noise...Yes. It doesn't matter where the information you are consuming is, regardless it as a continually challenging task to focus on what it is, that you would like to learn. Categorizing your interests, research areas and etc.. and developing a skillful approach to attacking this. Rather than jumping on the first bit of click-bait we may come across.

      Taking a unique approach to the information you choose to spend your time with (with an app like Readup) ; rather than approaching them in byte-size nuggets via social media is critical to ensuring you spend time learning the ideas that you are curious about.

    • Slate | Alison Green | 5/12/19 | 5 min
      11 reads4 comments
      9.0
      Slate
      11 reads
      9.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      The myth of the “dream job” can also make people stay in bad situations far longer than they should. It’s supposed to be their dream, after all, and it’s hard to reconcile that with walking away

      I feel that this can apply to other realms of our lives... such as the 'dream city' 'dream partner' and so on. Really helpful framing though from the author and highly reccomend reading this refreshing piece on why Dream jobs are a myth.

    • Union Square Ventures | Dani Grant | 11/19/18 | 5 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Union Square Ventures
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      People should be able to learn for the sake of learning for free, and if their goal is to learn in order to change their career or level up professionally, they could have the option to pay to expedite and certify their learning.

      Realistically we should all be able to learn whatever field or area of intellectual interest we may have. The question is now how to structure a system such as this; if we seemingly have more students than ever?

      Life-long learning is an area that really provokes my interest. If anyone has any additional links and/or reading in this area please share

    • Figma | 14 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Figma
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Incredibly encouraging. I have really enjoyed uncovering the way in which students are feeling about this present situation with a zoom-filled education and an increasingly overwhelming tuition price.

      There are many things great about an experience within a university system and yet there is clearly a ton that they need to address. I am optimistic about Ed-Tech, however it'll be an incredible challenge to recreate the collegiate social experience.

    • Nat Eliason | 1/10/19 | 5 min
      2 reads2 comments
      10
      Nat Eliason
      2 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Incredibly useful blog.

      Especially for those working as a freelancer, which can admittedly be isolating at times. However, we can adopt a system which helps us stay in-touch with others; and not miss out on some really valuable friendships.

      This involves way more effort than simply 'liking' someones post on Social media; it actually entails true human connection. So I will absolutely apply what I learned from this article.

    • Nat Eliason | 1/18/20 | 19 min
      1 read1 comment
      10
      Nat Eliason
      1 read
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Organizing one's thoughts can be incredibly challenging, let alone delineating the relationships between information you interact with to your present thought. I have been using the last 3 weeks now, and don't plan on stopping anytime soon.

      However, you really have to become a student of this. As in a sense: it helps one become a better note-taker, and honing on a more concrete focus. It is a powerful force already in my life!

      "Almost everything you type naturally lends itself to be linked to other topics in your database, and you constantly discover new opportunities to interlink your information. You don’t even need a reason to do it, you just add more links and if it’s useful later, great, if not, it doesn’t matter since it took no effort to add it."

    • latimes.com | Kevin Crust | 9/9/20 | 5 min
      7 reads5 comments
      8.3
      latimes.com
      7 reads
      8.3
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Cannot recommend enough watching the "Social Dilemma". Whether you are familiar with these topics or not, it is incredibly important to understand the present state our information environments are in.

      Nevertheless, there are solutions and we need to work together to come up with them. Being a Readup user is a great start, but this is just the very beginning of what is looking like to be an entirely new era of social media!

    • The Verge | Adi Robertson | 9/16/20 | 5 min
      2 reads1 comment
      9.0
      The Verge
      2 reads
      9.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      The Quest 2 is the first headset that will controversially require a Facebook sign-in, rather than allowing users to keep totally separate Oculus accounts. Quest 2 product manager Prabhu Parthasarathy says the motivation for this is “fundamentally social,” especially during the pandemic lockdown. “Every single social experience available on the platform has seen particular engagement in the past few months. We’ve always been thinking: what is the right moment to make our VR headsets more social? And we feel this is the right moment.”

      For those who have followed the history of Occulus, it deeply saddens me that Facebook has taken the reign over. But naturally, as what happens with a company that has far too much overwielding power, you have to use their core product, to 'unlock' access to another product that isn't necessarily related.

      I posted another article annotating Facebook's 'smart glasses', so it is incredibly important to watch this development unfold. It has me curious of what Facebook will do in the future of intrusive social media, as their business model is inherently based upon collecting as much data as it can on us (Surveillance Capitalism).

      It will not even surprise me if they will eventually start to give this shit away; based upon their money-making scheme... more accurate ads, more ad clicks as they look to compile as much data about our personal lives and now our homes.

      (Blake Harris's "The History of The Future" is a great book highlighting Occulus's brief history before FB)

      link to FB's 'smart' glasses announcement: https://readup.com/read/the-verge/facebooks-first-smart-glasses-will-be-ray-bans-coming-next-year

      1. Update (9/17/2020):

        *Whoops spelled Oculus wrong. forgive me lol

    • fs.blog | 7/2/14 | 2 min
      4 reads2 comments
      10
      fs.blog
      4 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      “Make sure,” he writes, “that anything that’s been on your list for three days gets a slot somewhere in your calendar or move it off the list."

      Always room for improvement when it comes to organization! This read was nice; and I have found myself repeating what it is that I put on my to-do list. This expiration idea is something I will surely apply.

    • The Verge | Nick Statt | 9/16/20 | 3 min
      2 reads1 comment
      -
      The Verge
      2 reads
      -
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Big Tech seemingly jumping onto every opportunity to initiate a new market. I am very curious with how this will turn out: I really do not feel like Facebook has the trust from consumers to get in this realm.

      Facebook also detailed a project at last year’s Oculus Connect conference it calls Live Maps, which the company says will be integral to help people use AR glasses in the real world by helping blend the virtual and real. That way, AR glasses can “download the most recent data from the 3D map, and then only have to detect changes — like new street names or the appearance of a new parking garage, and update the 3D map with those changes.”

      I am sure everyone will feel very comfortable knowing Facebook will now be able to witness our realities from a first-person perspective lol. Time shall tell.

    • Slate | Joe Morgan | 12/6/18 | 6 min
      42 reads18 comments
      8.0
      Slate
      42 reads
      8.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Try something. See how it works. Try again.

    • The New Yorker | Tim Wu | 8/21/15 | 5 min
      44 reads15 comments
      9.0
      The New Yorker
      44 reads
      9.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Insightful article; especially given the work-from-home movement.. As the office perpetually follows us everywhere.

      How do workplaces create a separation for their employees for the sake of their personal life? This will be the challenge for employers moving forward; or else I would be shocked to not see a growth in freelancers/contract work which is a whole different beast in itself.

      The fact that employees are now always reachable eliminates what was once a natural barrier of sorts, the idea that work was something that happened during office hours or at the physical office. With no limits, work becomes like a football game where the whistle is never blown.

    • cognitivemedium.com | 24 min
      1 read1 comment
      8.0
      cognitivemedium.com
      1 read
      8.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      If you love physics this is for you, personally I struggled grappling the examples, but the idea of thought as a technology fascinates me.

      what makes an interface transformational is when it introduces new elements of cognition that enable new modes of thought.

      When examining our utilization of different ways of attacking problems.. or even evaluating the types of technology it is critical to analyze the ways in which it impacts our thinking. Like for example, typing my comments out on my labtop versus doing it on a typewriter. What way of thinking is lost versus what way of thinking is enhanced?

      We cannot say a priori what new elements of cognition will look like, or what they will bring. But what we can do is ask good questions, and explore boldly.

      Asking good questions and having the confidence to explore boldly when it comes to approaching thought as a technology is a piece of advice I will gladly take.

    • bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Reading stuff like this is incredibly tough, yet so important to understand. Here is my attempt to delineate what happens by using some quotes from the text.

      "Cooped up inside her home and losing work due to the pandemic in the weeks before her outburst, Rein Lively filled the time she would've spent hanging out with friends and emailing clients by diving down conspiracy-fueled rabbit holes on Facebook and Instagram, worsening her feelings of isolation and fear."

      There is this inherent need in all of us to feel connected with others... however, the rage-fueled machines that social media platforms are... we are driven to see humanity at its worst; not its best. Due to the engagement metrics, that social media derives its worth from. The idea is the longer you are on the platform, the more ads they can cater to you, ensuring a good payday from advertisers directly to these platforms.

      Hence, the unfortunate growth of the statement 'doomscroll' as unfortunately we don't have the experience of 'joyscrolling' on these platforms. The reason being, is that when we are fearful, we are more than likely to act compulsively and grab our smartphones sharing this rather messed up news with someone else.. asking them can you believe this?!?

      "The algorithm leads you to some weird groups, and I would say I'm in some weird groups that are really just looking for something hopeful."

      With the decline in civic participation, religion, work in-person, school... people are in a desperate state for connection. So anyone, that shows an ounce of interest in the things we care about we are bound to try and engage them... especially when mediated by screens, which makes connecting much easier. .Versus meeting and joining an in-person group that has 10,000+ members, not that we can anyway due to the pandemic. But even before the pandemic, there were these trends.

      I highly suggest reading Robert Putnam's work on "Bowling Alone" a phenomenal read from 2000 describing the decline in American Community.

      DiResta said that the point of these outbursts can be for attention, money, or both, but ultimately "they're performing for the audience at home," not the people at the supermarket or the town meeting.

      As we continue to have more of an influence in our offline lives predicated by our online information ecologies; stranger and stranger things seem to be occurring. We are at a new stage of hunter-gatherering, and that if we aren't food deprived we are information-deprived. And we want to be the first to uncover something, to share it with others. To the point that it no longer matters for the person in reality that you are berating about having to wear a mask; instead it is for the feedback loop online: a like, a retweet, a supportive comment.

      Online communities are great but they are also having real-world implications. How do we re-create a new wave of offline communities? Or are we too far past this point?

    • Mark Manson | 7/4/14 | 10 min
      25 reads4 comments
      8.7
      Mark Manson
      25 reads
      8.7
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago
    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 6/5/20 | 4 min
      18 reads8 comments
      10
      blog.readup.com
      18 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      1 week ago

      Ten years from now, we’ll look back on these days and we’ll wonder how we survived such dark, confusing times. Bouncing, scrolling, clicking, always moving, moving, moving. The sum of the parts is a distraction machine, which is why we’re building an attention engine. As a bonus, we’ll never again have to wonder whether or not a particular commenter actually read an article they commented on. And not just on Readup, but everywhere.

      Love this! I am all for it. Readup has been a joy introducing to others, as well as whenever I spend time on the platform I feel as if it is continually an enriching experience overtime.

    • paulgraham.com | 3 min
      4 reads3 comments
      10
      paulgraham.com
      4 reads
      10
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      You can't directly control where your thoughts drift. If you're controlling them, they're not drifting. But you can control them indirectly, by controlling what situations you let yourself get into. That has been the lesson for me: be careful what you let become critical to you. Try to get yourself into situations where the most urgent problems are ones you want to think about.

      Creating an environment in which you are able to focus on the problems that matter to you the most is critical to success, and it can be challenging to maintain this balance. However, the only way we can address this is by acting one step, one decision ans one action at a time!

    • superorganizers.substack.com | Dan Shipper | 6/26/20 | 12 min
      3 reads3 comments
      9.0
      superorganizers.substack.com
      3 reads
      9.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      The more precisely we know what to use a piece of information for, the more precisely we can organize it.

    • roambrain.com | 5/20/20 | 6 min
      1 read0 comments
      9.0
      roambrain.com
      1 read
      9.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago
    • roambrain.com | 7/22/20 | 6 min
      1 read1 comment
      8.0
      roambrain.com
      1 read
      8.0
      bartadamley
      ScoutScribe
      2 weeks ago

      Algorithms of thought, are an interesting concept to grapple with. However, it makes sense for those who approach things with a more methodical mindset.

      This is an article that I have read that feels useful, just I am unsure if it'll be useful in the coming future. But by all means it is good to have the framework established for algorithms of thought.