1. Join Readup to read with bartadamley.

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    • The New York Times Company | ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS | 11/27/20 | 7 min
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      1 day ago

      It’s like the only thing we have educated high schoolers for: standardized testing & college prep... is fundamentally failing.

      Makes one wonder about all the others.. you know the kids who didn’t apply to college this time around.

      I think the goal from a K-12 education should be to spread the love of learning. And preparing kids how to effectively use the latest technologies for exploration, in terms of the things that interest them.

    • Meatspace Algorithms | Jonathan Hillis | 3/7/21 | 6 min
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      2 days ago

      Really interesting take on establishing a place for online creators to gather... tons of additional articles/reads to parse through as well. Creating an initial getaway for online creators is an interesting concept, especially as it relates to what truly does foster great innovation in an area.

      I have undoubtedly met a lot more friends online in the past year than I have offline. And increasingly in the same fields that I find inspiring. In a post-COVID world I do wonder if this will lead me to living in a different area, because of this... or if I’ll be an entirely remote worker.

      Regardless, a getaway like the one that author posits could be a short-term solution.. to meet & build momentum versus a long-term fix. Interesting stuff to say the least.

    • WIRED | Jason Kehe | 3/17/21 | 3 min
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      2 days ago

      I need to figure out a way to watch We Are As Gods! Stewart Brand is definitely up there in terms of my heroes.

      Here’s a little preface to what the documentary entails.

    • Daniel H. Pink | 3/9/09 | 1 min
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      2 days ago

      Short & sweet. Don’t know who needs this, but here is a little productivity jolt.

    • forbes.com | Charles Silver | 1/6/20 | 4 min
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      2 days ago

      Onwards from the days of Web 2.0 where the dominant players sell their users as the product. Instead we are slowly, but surely embarking to an internet in which users become the major stakeholders rather than a company's shareholders.

      Web 3.0’s decentralized blockchain protocol will enable individuals to connect to an internet where they can own and be properly compensated for their time and data, eclipsing an exploitative and unjust web, where giant, centralized repositories are the only ones that own and profit from it.

      Drop any platforms in the comments that you believe will lead us in the new wave of Web 3.0!

      Readup as our number one source for all things reading articles of course ;)

    • bartadamley
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      6 days ago

      For those interested.. here is a beginner's guide to the seminal Bitcoin Whitepaper by Satoshi Nakamoto.

      Since a maximum of 21 million Bitcoins will ever be mined, the system can be free of inflation. Therefore, Bitcoin can serve as a sustainable store of value, similar to gold. Compare that to fiat currency, such as the U.S. dollar. Due to inflation, the dollar has devalued nearly 97 percent since 1913.

      This was surely, the quote that stuck out to me the most. Considering Bitcoin as the digital equivalent of "Gold" . . whereas explaining how the dollar can be continued to be devalued due to it being a fiat currency.

      Well, what the heck is fiat currency? I ended up looking this up.

      Fiat money is government-issued currency that is not backed by a physical commodity, such as gold or silver, but rather by the government that issued it.

      So much to untangle, but progress is being made.

    • NAKAMOTO | Vitalik Buterin | 1/4/20 | 15 min
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      6 days ago

      help! I am going down a cryptocurrency rabbit hole and cannot stop.

      here is the latest article from my adventure. "Credible Neutrality as a guiding principle"

      But in credibly neutral mechanism design, the goal is that these desired outcomes are not written into the mechanism; instead, they are emergently discovered from the participants’ actions.

    • vitalik.ca | 21 min
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      1 week ago

      This article does a brilliant job capturing what it means to be legitimate.

      Legitimacy is a pattern of higher-order acceptance. An outcome in some social context is legitimate if the people in that social context broadly accept and play their part in enacting that outcome, and each individual person does so because they expect everyone else to do the same.

      So much of the way society operates is based on a shared acceptance of legitimacy. Especially as we think about the "value" of some financial instrument, good, product and/or service.

      Hearing more from the Ethereum founder himself: Vitalik Buterin, as to why legitimacy is the basis of pretty much any societal function... was a refreshing take. Especially as it relates to the buzz of NFTs and cryptocurrencies.

      Cannot recommend this read enough. So many further questions to explore!

    • The New York Times Company | SARAH LYALL | 4/3/21 | 8 min
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      2 weeks ago

      The reassuring part about this past year... is that collectively we have all gone through it together.

      Now, what to make of the in-between time?

    • mindapi | Mind Apivessa | 6 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Like diners, through the quality of the course materials and activities, students can tell if the experience is prepared with passion or just as a thing on their educator’s to-do list.

      Love this idea for framing education from a hospitality inspired point of view.

      One thing I learned from this article is that we should design our environments for learning with more intent, just as a restaurant creates an intimate setting for those dining. Thus, creating a memorable experience and building excitement for the next meal/lesson.

    • ribbonfarm | 12/2/20 | 6 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Bravo. Recommend all three pieces of this very brief essay series from Mike Elias who runs ideamarket.io. An idea for a marketplace ran by trust/reputation in terms of valuation.

      An epistemic currency market would establish a direct relationship between prominence and scrutiny, illuminating the best ROI on your trust.

    • ribbonfarm | 9/23/20 | 7 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Orwell’s warning that “journalism is what somebody doesn’t want you to hear, everything else is public relations” speaks to risk as the prerequisite for journalistic trust. Trust — like money — must be earned.

      Thinking of trust as the fundamental backbone of an economy sounds like a much better route to go right?

      Stay tuned for part #3.

    • ribbonfarm | 9/3/20 | 9 min
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      2 weeks ago

      To establish a fact, someone must decide what context is relevant to include, and what to exclude.

      This is the first part of a three-part essay series on Ribbonfarm by Mike Elias, the founder of a "marketplace of ideas". I plan on reading the rest of the series, so I will be sure to drop the rest on here :)

      https://ideamarket.io/

      ^Interesting to dive deeper into the origins of why something like Ideamarket is needed for establishing better methodologies for sensemaking. As clearly, the current form is not working on a societal level.

    • The Baffler | 9/4/17 | 33 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Interesting read. Team Telegram all the way.

      Good introductory read detailing the dramatic beginnings of Telegram, the type of article for anyone interested in encrypted communication.

      Do not use Signal, plain and simple.

    • ribbonfarm | 6/9/11 | 42 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Surprise-surprise, another brilliant Venkatesh Rao Article. This time he does a deep dive on the history of the corporation. Throw away your business textbooks, and start reading Rao for insights on the business world as you have never seen them.

      The corporate form is a codified bundle of quasi-religious beliefs externalized into an animate form that seeks to preserve itself like any other living creature.

    • BBC News | Christine Ro | 10 min
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      2 weeks ago

      This was a useful article touching on Dunbar's Number.. Which is theoretically agreed to be about 150 relationships people are able to maintain.

      One of my experiments with putting my music online, is reaching out to my Dunbar number equivalent group of listeners by text to share my new music. I would be curious to see how this would shape out overtime.. seeing what sorts of "network effects" it may have.

      I think an interesting experiment to try for the next year is: reaching out to 150 people individually for each release of new music I do. This sounds incredibly challenging, and yet I am curious to see if this theory is legitimate or not.

      Perhaps diving into more details for what I hope to accomplish is necessary.. but this is just the inception of the idea :)

    • O'Reilly Media | Tim O’Reilly | 3/11/21 | 33 min
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      3 weeks ago

      What bubble?

      What can you call it but a bubble when the median valuation of this past year’s tech IPOs was 24 times trailing revenue.

      Would really like to read more of Tim O'Reilly as his writing/podcasts/etc.. keeps popping back up on my radar. Interesting read pondering on what the future of technology needs to/will end up looking like in the future.

      Make a real difference in people’s lives. You will know you have done that when operating profits fairly earned, not stock market gains, are your measure of investment success.

    • Forte Labs | 3/15/21 | 17 min
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      3 weeks ago

      That is what really changes your life – when you change your own social environment. We are the sum of the 5 people we spend the most time with. The Internet makes it possible to pick who those people are for the first time.

      What software do you use? what programming languages do you use? what social media do you use?

      Recognize that every action we take online has an influence. Do your online activities bring you further to your goals? Or does it drive you further away into a spiral of consumption rather than creation?

    • The New Yorker | Cal Newport | 2/26/21 | 12 min
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      4 weeks ago

      Cal Newport wrote this piece excellently. I am convinced there is no such thing as "catching up" on email.

      "E-mail creates for example, a tortuous cycle that increases the amount of work on our plate while simultaneously thwarting, through constant distraction, our ability to accomplish it effectively."

      What would a workplace without email even look like?

    • Medium | Quinn Norton | 8/8/14 | 14 min
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      1 month ago

      Really excellent article that positions us in the present state of the networked age we now live in.. and how we are only getting started!

      How many kings and philosophers of old would have given their lives for 10 minutes with your smart phone? And that’s all yours, for a monthly contract with a shitty telco.

    • WIRED | Joshua Davis | 3/28/13 | 17 min
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      1 month ago

      “Instead of getting me flowers, she was trying to buy me,” Merrill says. “It bodes well.”

      Wow. Highly recommend this piece, to activate some dystopic/utopic ideas regarding if we had a "personal stock market". Personal IPO's and so on.

    • blog.theboringtech.io | 21 min
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      1 month ago

      For someone not too familiar with a lot of the programming lingo, it may be kind of hard to read this article as it was myself.

      There were tons of tough acronyms, I have yet to learn, however, the piece did provide some interesting insight.

      Basically, If you’re married to your application and love it, then the datastore is like extended family. You must spend time learning more about it.

      Basically, this is the nudge I need when it comes to my approach for how I can use both Roam Research as a notetaking tool as well as using Logic Pro for making some new dirty beats!

      Happily married to both software applications, and now need to spend the time refining my craft.

    • Ness Labs | 3/3/21 | 8 min
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      1 month ago

      Whether you want to expand your career options or cultivate your curiosity, investing in personal knowledge is never a bad choice.

      Lifelong learning is the way of the future. Start taking advantage of the digital tools we have at our disposal now!

    • The Freelance Graduate Student | Adam Bartley | 3/11/21 | 6 min
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      1 month ago

      Shameless plug for my latest newsletter.

      I dare you to plan the next ten books you want to read, and stick to it!

      I am super curious to see who would like to get involved in challenging themselves to plan on reading 10 specific books... as well as detailing what you hope to learn from this challenge!

    • CNN | Oscar Holland, CNN | 3/10/21 | 8 min
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      1 month ago

      This is really my first exposure to NFT’s, and it is quite fascinating to reflect on what this means for the ‘digital art’ world. Alas, a way for artists to monetize their digital works.

      There are tons of terms to parse over and entirely a new vocabulary to learn in this realm.

      I am curious to learn of how NFT’s applies to writers online.

    • themargins.substack.com | Can Duruk | 1/24/21 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      Every once in a while when I go do an intermittent Twitter fast, I am reminded how fast the memes and narratives come and go. Stay away from it, for example, a week or so, and half the conversation becomes indecipherable. Such is the way of content on the pulse of the world.

      This really is the truth, I think this is why the "digital gardening" craze, as well as the surge of hype around PKM tools has skyrocketed. The amount of content we seem to consume, as well as create only increases by the wayside... it is interesting to hear this take.

      Content is everything now. And yet, we must consider what strategies we can use when having this nonsense yet also knowledge hydrant continually flowing. Really - it is okay to turn it off every once in a while.

      Those moments when you pay meaningful attention, are the moments when you can create your own work (developing authenticity), rather than continually consuming.

    • ribbonfarm | 8/8/17 | 23 min
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      1 month ago

      Really fascinating article depicting who, what and why "Lonely Atoms" are the way they are.

      Lonely Atoms are men who live as boys would, if they could, for as long as they can.

      The part that intrigued me the most was talking about how the cost of working is losing the opportunity to have more "leisure" time. As we also have way more enticing technologies dedicated to leisure making "work" less attractive.

      However, I have been intrigued to read more into the "passion economy" and learn more about this. It is essentially a way for those who "consume" to become "creators" /participants in the passion economy making money off of what was once deemed a dead end.

      https://readup.com/comments/andreessen-horowitz/the-passion-economy-and-the-future-of-work---andreessen-horowitz/VXwJ75

      Just to think if I had gotten into streaming video games, before a whole industry has been started via Twitch..

      All else being equal, they would like to be happy on their own, hermetically-sealed terms. For them, preferring not to is not an ethic. It is a means of maximizing happiness- not as a future goal, but as a presently achievable and consumable goal.

      So perhaps my question to this is what is the opposite of a lonely atom?

      My hypothesis is a self-educated creator.

      Those who find meaning by setting long-term creative goals, rather than getting sucked into short-term consumptive goals.

      Typically, algorithmically driven goals. (but we can save this for an entirely different conversation).

    • Li's Newsletter | Li Jin | 7/29/20 | 15 min
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      1 month ago

      Employment at a company is itself a bundle of various services and infrastructure, and micro-entrepreneurs piece these together on their own.

      Wow-wee. So many great resources, and/or startups that were mentioned in this article, that I am thrilled to check out. We are clearly entering an entirely different age of work, and Li Jin does a wonderful job depicting all of these changes.

      The internet is empowering an entirely new age of work away from our previous way of industrialization era life-long jobs.

      However, we need a better way to educate individuals for the realities of the work that is available upon graduation from K-12, as well as college. As clearly we are behind the ball in this regard.

      Flexible learning, and continually iterating on your share of skills is essential to dare I say "survive" in the 21st century workforce.

    • cdixon.org | 11 min
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      1 month ago

      Decent piece on why decentralization matters.

      There is still a ton on this topic that I am only beginning to understand. This is me stating that I will now try and read more intently when it comes to understanding crypto networks and what this means for the future.

    • Livemint | Manu Joseph | 9/20/20 | 5 min
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    • Naval | 3/25/19 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      Very often specific knowledge is at the edge of knowledge. It’s also stuff that’s just being figured out or is really hard to figure out.

      When pursuing specific knowledge it's as if you are walking along the coastline of what's happening currently, what has happened in the past, as well as imagining what's possible in the coming future for a particular way of life. It's continually pursuing your curiosity, knowing that you will forge your way. There is a certain amount of belief you have to hold yourself to in the pursuit of specific knowledge.

    • Hyperallergic | Edward M. Gómez | 5/14/16 | 10 min
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      1 month ago

      We could use more Counter Education in the world, especially when it applies to coming up with alternatives for higher-ed.

      “The 1960s was a time of extensive experimentation with alternative pedagogies. Before Blueprint was published, Stein and Miller actually went out and field-tested their ideas at various colleges. Ultimately, what they created was a library; a library is the very core of their project.”

      I love how the very core of this project was just to simply build out a library. Which really when you think about it, the material in which we spend time learning while in academia is based entirely off of the books we are required to read and/or learn from.

      I am so curious to see the way that Alt-EDU shapes out over time.

    • alexdanco.com | 1/23/20 | 20 min
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      1 month ago

      Social capital is interesting when it opens doors for people who don’t have power yet. It’s actually much more interesting than conventional power, because one is typically a leading indicator of success whereas the other is a lagging indicator. Potential value is far more interesting than value fully realized.

    • Variety | Jem Aswad | 3/2/21 | 5 min
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      1 month ago

      First SoundCloud for music.

      Next Readup for writing.

      Exciting times!

    • er.educause.edu | 21 min
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      Online, you have to decide which people you are going to allow into your attention sphere. Who is going to take up your mind, your space? Is the person trustworthy? Entertaining? Useful? An expert?

      The main takeaway I got from this article was that viewing our social networks as personal learning networks is the best way forward.

      Instead of haphazardly following particular individuals and/or pages, it is best if we go about this with more intent.

      Definitely recommend this piece!

    • ribbonfarm | 1/6/11 | 23 min
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      A consumer is a human being reduced to the sum total of the behaviors that define his various customer-roles in relation to the products and services s/he consumes.

      Thinking further on this line and how it reflects in the software that we use daily in our time online.. starting with the rather easy comparison with a social platform like Facebook. As they build up better ability to predict future behaviors based upon the "psychographics" they have accumulated from our activity on their site.

      When will we have online services that actually free us, instead of trap us?

      Readup is in that direction.

      What does the future of "social media" look like? To get away from this disturbing trend?

      Is it a switch of market incentives that drives us there?

    • ribbonfarm | 5/4/12 | 23 min
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      1 month ago

      The cost of words is not the cost of storing them or distributing, but the cost of producing them. Words are cheap today because we put little effort into their production, not because we can store and transmit as much as we like.

    • Collaborative Fund | Morgan Housel | 2/11/21 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      Really rich article detailing the wonders of a great story.. and how a particularly worded message can resonate much better when built off other brilliant minds previous work.

      Charles Darwin didn’t discover evolution, he just wrote the first and most compelling book about it.

      How many great ideas have already been discovered but could grow 100x or more if someone just explained them better?

      This is why reading is such a beneficial activity. It is a discovery process as you search for previous wisdom, ideas that weren't fully executed... and that intriguing process of re-imagining them in the present.

      Re-imagining these previously discarded ideas into our age today, and potentially creating a movement, business, life change as a result of this. This is an incredibly powerful thing!

    • HISTORY.com | Dave Roos | 8/28/19 | 9 min
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      1 month ago

      Palmer says that one hand-copied book in the 14th century cost as much as a house and libraries cost a small fortune. The largest European library in 1300 was the university library of Paris, which had 300 total manuscripts.

      Remember this next time you are upset about spending more than $10 for a new book!

      Since literacy rates were still very low in the 1490s, locals would gather at the pub to hear a paid reader recite the latest news, which was everything from bawdy scandals to war reports.

      What's the modern day equivalent of a paid reader?

      I have been shifting my research of the internet and all the radical change it is causing, by studying the vast technological changes such as the printing press and how it restructured society.

      This is not our first rodeo!

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 2/22/21 | 7 min
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      1 month ago

      Goodness. That Pie Chart Graphic for paying writers really does look wonderful. Reminds me of a Color Wheel. Do we have a name for this yet?

      Regardless, this hypothesis is something that gets me pumped up. I fundamentally believe in Readup's mission, to create a better experience online... where you know individuals are giving their undivided attention on a given topic for a particular read.

      I want an internet where conversations are context-dependent. Readup is helping move the needle on this exact problem space.