1. Join Readup to read with bartadamley.

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    • The Bold Italic | Sunil Rajaraman | 8/15/16 | 14 min
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      1 day ago

      This piece is way too good just to be seeing now.

      However, it is entirely relatable even if you aren’t living in the Valley... as the products/services discussed are ones we now seem to encounter everyday now, not just in the Valley but everywhere.

      It makes me feel bad for those who incessantly scroll on various platforms of all kinds, rather than just sticking to a set few. If Readup isn’t in that set few apps to have at your disposal, well it’s time to change!

    • TechCrunch | Natasha Mascarenhas | 11/12/20 | 3 min
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      More & more players are jumping into the Ed-tech game 👀

      I love the idea of a live cohort-based course platform... whoever can execute in this space will surely do well.

      It leaves one curious to see what the future of credentialism will be? To me, college degrees are vastly overrated. And effectively learning how to learn, being a self-starter as well as learning discipline is far more important.

    • The Atlantic | John McWhorter | 9/1/20 | 9 min
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      Ostracism is a form of social death. It is a very potent threat.

    • DetroitNews | Adam Graham | 6 min
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      1 day ago

      Crazy. I would’ve never thought my trading cards I used to collect as a kid could be worth so much.

      It is interesting too considering the time in which I started to collect my various sports cards... early 2000s into perhaps 2008-2009 (Baseball & Hockey) were my specialty.

      After reading this I have determined I have the desire to dip back into nostalgia, and check out my cards, to see what the value of these bad boys are... perhaps selling some & holding onto my rare ones.

      For any card collectors I highly recommend this read!

    • aaronzlewis.com | Aaron Z. Lewis | 18 min
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      1 day ago

      Really great article, detailing the psychology behind anonymous accounts online and how it is helping shape and experiment with individuals identities.. Identity R&D.

      As usual, Gen Z is leading the way. They run fake Instagram accounts that don’t optimize for reach, scale, or brand recognition. Kids cycle through digital identities like they cycle through clothes. And their experiments are trickling up to the rest of us.

    • The New York Times Company | LISA FELDMAN BARRETT | 11/23/20 | 4 min
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      2 days ago

      What should be the first thing I do getting out of bed this morning?

      Meditating, or Drinking a Glass of Water?

      Anyway, this is a really helpful article to have as the Article of the Day, to remind us that we are not as helpless as it may seem. We actually have the ability to alter our brain chemistry, by making one simple decision for example... to drink that glass of water when we get out of bed first thing!

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 11/23/20 | 7 min
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      2 days ago

      Readers > Users.

      Plain & Simple!

    • roambrain.com | 11/10/20 | 10 min
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      3 days ago
    • Stanford Undergraduate Program in Product Design | 10 min
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      3 days ago

      Imagine living back in the 60s and reading this?

      A fundamental hypothesis of the proposed approach is that the ability of a given human to control the real-time external manipulation of symbols, in response to the minute-by-minute needs of his thought processes, has a profound effect upon the whole structure of concepts and methods utilized in his intellectual activity.

      How have we lived up to such tech idealism way back in the day? It is a shame, that tech's brightest minds are investing the energy in creating more efficient Machine Learning techniques in order to trick us to go through more ads.

      I really appreciate articles such as this, because we can realize how far off course we have gone with technology. And that the simple aspect of information retrieval, and symbol manipulation is transformative for our intellect. Giving us the ability to recombine thoughts never imagined before!

      The areas should involve a limited domain of information, and limited external-world interaction, to keep the system we are studying within a manageable scope.

      Notice- that this quote didn't say unlimited information, but instead limited information.. because the information we interact with on a daily basis, is highly more than a human being is capable of withstanding.

      I almost wish there was a setting for us on our phones to set an information retrieval capacity.. just as there as a set time limit for days.

    • NFX | 7/25/19 | 37 min
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      4 days ago
    • NFX | 7/25/19 | 37 min
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      4 days ago

      WOW! Crazy in-depth read detailing anything and everything about Network Effects.

      Anyone that is interested in creating a startup, fascinated by the way the internet transforms business... this is a really helpful piece.

      Wish I read this in undergrad. Definitely, one I will have to revisit!

    • The Economist | 10/24/20 | 5 min
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      5 days ago

      Really useful article to grasp where we are in this current political moment. This is a read I typically wouldn’t pick up & read, but come onto the horizon thanks to @Billsfriendjake! Thanks for the find!

    • personalmba.com | Josh Kaufman | 12 min
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      1 week ago

      So cool!

      If you build a portfolio of notes to capture what you learn through The Personal MBA, you’ll have a tangible asset to prove your hard work and dedication during the interview process.

      This is what I meant by publicizing your learnings.. as it is easy to claim you have learned a ton, if you haven't written anything down and/or released anything to the public.

      Since, I opted to not go to graduate school due to incredibly high-tuition.. I have found myself wanting to establish a framework for those interested in self-education.

      Gathering more resources on this topic, is proving fruitful.. and if anyone else has any recommendations for reading. please let me know!

    • LinkedIn Pulse | 4 min
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      1 week ago

      Really cool scaffolding for the idea of a self-educational program. I think the only way this sort of thing would work, is by Learning in Public.. sharing what you have found along the way, for anyone truly interested.

      Definitely will keep this read starred, as I ponder all ideas self-education.

      The future of education is self-taught!

      Perhaps it always was... the more I study into it.

    • Check your Pulse | Sari | 11/10/20 | 10 min
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      1 week ago

      “Come for the Content, Stay for the Community”

      Readup - in a nutshell.

    • zettelkasten.de | sascha | 7 min
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      1 week ago

      A Zettelkasten doesn’t make you a productivity maniac but only leverages your efforts.

      Thank goodness. As I further embrace the Zettelkasten as my note-taking method, it has me curious what will come from this long-game with my notes. Just as with anything, it becomes what you put into it.

      However, Luhmann stated that working with the Zettelkasten consumed most of his time, not the actual book writing. That gives us a hint, that it is the manic work with the Zettelkasten that results in such a high productivity.

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 11/16/20 | 10 min
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      1 week ago

      Many important questions to ask about Readup!

      I am all for this idea of being radically transparent moving forward.. with the high-level discussions for Readup taking place in a public format, so that our lovely community knows where we stand on this or that.

      Cheers to progress one week, one day, one hour at a time!

    • jmulholland.com | 8 min
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      1 week ago

      So many useful sources and a really wonderful way of piecing together the concepts of forming a small group.

      Together, we are so much better!

      Curious about the ideal group size?

      Around a dozen members is the sweet spot of social motivation: small enough to know everyone, yet large enough that the group won’t collapse if one or two members’ enthusiasm wanes; small enough that you are not daunted by competing with the whole world, yet large enough that you still need to be on your toes to keep up.

      The assistance members can give one another isn’t purely motivational, however. In-person communication is high-bandwidth and offers feedback that is difficult to replicate elsewhere. An ongoing relationship provides more effective advice, allowing the use of shorthand for concepts and a two-way conversation that autodidactic education lacks.

      Having a space to discuss latest ideas, research you have come across, highlighting tips for inquiry... can be such a useful thing for all of us.

      Someday, down the line... there will be a connector app of some sort that will successfully allocate each and everyone of us to a group.. giving us the opportunity to discuss our passions. sharing novel ideas about our interests and so on... sparking the curiosity of others.

      As I said at the top... together we are so much better.

    • benjamin-franklin-history.org | 4 min
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      1 week ago

      One of the books I have set to the side to read is the "Great, Good Place" about hangouts within a community.. and this article very much reminds me of this.

      One of my worries, yet opportunities for innovation in a post-covid world is the opportunity to start activity within the community. there will only be an ever-increasing need for in-person interaction, as more of our work is able to be done remotely.. hence a growing need for stronger community.

      We should take inspiration from Benjamin Franklin's "Junto Club" as they stuck to helping out their community while also benefitting themselves.. in a true win-win fashion.

      Members of the Junto club were avid readers and intellectuals involved in their individual improvement and that of society. The Junto was a launching pad for many public projects. Out of the meetings came proposals for the creation of the first lending library, the Union Fire Company, the [University of Pennsylvania, volunteer militia, Pennsylvania Hospital.

      Who's trying to join a modern-day Junto Club?

    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 12 min
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      1 week ago

      Hoarding ideas or code tends to be counterproductive due to the likelihood that another contestant will stumble on the same idea, improve upon it in unexpected ways, or detect a flaw that allows it to “fail fast.”

    • zettelkasten.de | sascha | 5 min
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      1 week ago

      I really enjoyed this article as the author dives into his outlook on his knowledge work 'days'. He prefaces this article with the framing of a "Deep Work" outlook, which I still need to read this book!

      It makes me envy his dedication to these particular days, and yet also, has me curious on how much of a helpful exercise going through the intricate details of our routine can be by writing it out... we can see if there is any room for iteration and improvement. Future blog post... perhaps?

      It is not enough to casually read a piece of work if you really want to understand it. After all, it is called [[knowledge work]] and not [[knowledge chill-out]].

    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 8 min
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      This is a world (software) I am unfamiliar with, as I increasingly read more into Venkatesh Rao's "Breaking Smart", however, I think it is vital to understand this.

      In the digital age, engineering labs are experimental sections inside impressive, enduring products. Those who bemoan the gradual decline of famous engineering labs like AT&T Bell Labs and Xerox PARC often miss the rise of even more impressive labs inside major modern products and their developer ecosystems.

      I am often fascinated by the history of Bell Labs, XEROX Parc and the RAND corporation.. and how so much innovation took place in such a short amount of time. It is often thought, that universities are on-par with instituitons like this, but ideas seemingly move so much slower.. .rather than implementing a line of code.

      So my fascination right now lies with, how can we create better tools for collective intelligence, creating a darwinist-like "survival of the fittest" for innovative ideas. One could say Venture Capital in part works like this, but just as with most things it comes down to "who you know" in the VC world.

      So I am curious on how ideas can be rapidly be implemented.. whether it is establishing a business based off of someone's tweet for a new innovative service and then allocating the appropriate human capital to work on that project.

      Does this make any sense? Lol, this is why I love the comments section on here as it gives me a chance to spitball my ideas.

    • Robin Sloan | 3 min
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      1 week ago

      Really unique way of framing social media in this piece. This is my first introduction to the concept of orthographic projection... and it really is that one size fits all presentation of any message on social media that makes it so enticing. Now where the real question rests: does this piece of information projected over my screen truly impact me? Is there anything I can do about this?

      We really need to examine our intuition while using these ‘social’ products.

    • Ryan Kulp | 2/18/14 | 1 min
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      1 week ago

      structure your environments... so you are able to enjoy the mundane of it. also: you are what you spend your time on!

    • HuffPost Highline | Kate Morgan | 11/9/20 | 5 min
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      1 week ago

      RIP to a legend. This one really deserves Article of the Day!

    • zettelkasten.de | sascha | 38 min
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      holy smokes. creating a zettelkasten for my system of notetaking is going to be an immense undertaking, but reading very thorough pieces such as this... which is somehow listed as an 'introduction' yet extremely specific.. is incredibly helpful.

      The idea of implementing a Zettelkasten (which means 'slipbox') in German, is to develop a notetaking system.. that develops not a collection of notes.. but instead a web of interconnected notes.

      Ensuring that your notetaking system, has a way to repackage/repurpose thoughts is a way to ensure that none of your knowledge work goes to waste.

      The real challenge lies within the organizational structure of your Zettelkasten. Hence, my reading of this today. Tons of work to do on this!

    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 13 min
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      2 weeks ago

      This was probably the hardest time I had going through one of the essays from "Breaking Smart" - However, I still found some value in it.

      Constraints in software tend to be relatively few and obvious. Possibilities, however, tend to be intimidatingly vast. Resisting limiting visions, finding the most fertile direction, and allying with the right people become the primary challenges.

    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 7 min
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      Still takes a second to grasp the opportunities and consequences of a change like this! How will we look back on 2020 ... 60 years out in technological terms? As far as accessibility goes?

      In 1943, only a small handful of people working on classified military projects had access to the earliest computers. Even in 1974, the year of Peak Centralization, only a small and privileged group had access to the early hacker-friendly minicomputers like the DEC PDP series. But by 1993, the PC revolution had nearly delivered on Bill Gates’ vision of a computer at every desk, at least in the developed world. And by 2000, laptops and Blackberries were already foreshadowing the world of today, with near-universal access to smartphones, and an exploding number of computers per person.

    • mcluhansnewsciences.com | 6 min
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      2 weeks ago

      City as Classroom is a really neat concept. I enjoy the idea about class should be used to come up with really good questions to approach the outside world with.

      It makes one toy with what exactly should a class look and feel like nowadays. It also has me curious how K-12 & higher ed will adjust in a post-pandemic world. My belief is less in-person lectures as this will migrate entirely to the online space... whereas facilitating course exercises/workshops will be further emphasized in-person.

      Awesome to find insight from the ‘70s however.

    • blog.readup.com | Bill Loundy | 11/9/20 | 7 min
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      2 weeks ago

      I have such high hopes and belief in Readup to pull this thing off.

      Readup is fixing social media and saving the journalism industry. It costs five, fifteen, or twenty-five dollars per month. You choose how much you want to contribute. Readup keeps half. The other half will be evenly distributed amongst the writers whose articles you read fully. It’s the easiest way to support writers directly. And Readup will show you EXACTLY where all of your money is going, down to the penny.

      And remember: anybody who creates an account before the paid version goes live will be able to remain free for life. This is our gift to the people who made Readup possible. And, if everything goes according to plan, it will be a pretty cool thing to brag about when half the planet is on Readup.

      Over the weekend, I had stayed at a hotel and found myself unable to sleep due to the pure silence in our room in which we were staying in and random creaks out in the hall..

      So - I did as just about all of us do nowadays. I took out my phone, to take my mind off the silence and because I was frankly getting frustrated by my inability to fall asleep.

      Previously, the first app I would have opened up.. would have been Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snap you know the powerful four... of consumption, attention-extracting, FOMO-inducing.. platforms.

      However, thankfully being a Readup user the past year or so, I launched my Readup app. Now I have zero of the dominant social media platforms downloaded on my iPhone. Matter of fact, the only way I can access social media is by Safari on my phone, and this is a very porous user experience. (I highly recommend this if you are trying to quit social media).

      Nevertheless, I found myself diving deep into article after article that I have starred over the course of this last year. And as a matter of fact, I found a way to really enjoy my late night/early morning.. It went from a poor night of sleep, to a night of really great reading over a span of about an hour, of sustained focus and attention.. which is how reading is therapeutic in a sense.

      Readup served as a comfort for me. That comfort that Readup provides, on a night of broken sleep, is something I am very grateful for!

      For all of us 'early adopters' who are able to have an application free for life such as Readup is powerful and meditative.. so damnit let's do our best to find three friends and get them to download Readup!

    • Cool Tools | Kevin Kelly | 4 min
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      2 weeks ago

      I will always love Kevin Kelly’s tech optimism. It is vital to recognize the abundance of opportunities technology presents us with... it just comes down to the execution of our ideas

    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 10 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Every field eaten by software experiences a migration of the creative part from visioning activities to hands-on activities, disrupting the social structure of all professions.

      So in essence there comes a point in which the envisioning work is done and it then becomes time to build! Super interesting read.

    • Medium | RPP Editorial Team | 5/1/17 | 8 min
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      2 weeks ago

      We shape our tools and thereafter, they shape us.

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      2 weeks ago

      Practical advice for our increasingly information-saturated age.

    • roambrain.com | 11/3/20 | 2 min
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      2 weeks ago

      From E-books to R-books?

    • roambrain.com | 3/31/20 | 7 min
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      2 weeks ago

      using a note-taking tool like Roam, is in essence a minimalist move. From less clutter on your desk... to making this clutter searchable on your computer. Turning your clutter into something that then becomes reusable. Like a knowledge building Lego block!

    • Ness Labs | 8/13/19 | 4 min
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      2 weeks ago

      Quantity over quality. As with creativity, quantity is more important than quality when it comes to note-taking. Evidence shows that the more notes you take, the more information you tend to remember later. So don’t try to keep it short—be generous in the way you take notes.

    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 6 min
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      software is perhaps the most imagination-expanding technology humans have invented since writing and money, and possibly more powerful than either.

      A mass flourishing is what Rao predicts... due to software. I have to admit the argument is quite compelling. I am going to continue reading these posts within this series. Stay tuned, and join the fun!

    • roambrain.com | 3/31/20 | 14 min
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      2 weeks ago
    • breaking smart | 2/7/15 | 11 min
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      Perhaps, it is a result of where my thinking has been the past 8 months or so.. but wow it is hard not to think of this statement in terms of the future of higher education for me.

      As a result of a Promethean technology being unleashed, younger and older face a similar dilemma: should I abandon some of my investments in the industrial social order and join the dynamic new social order, or hold on to the status quo as long as possible?

      do PhD's through universities still make sense? or is this just apart of the previous paradigm and we are holding onto something that no longer makes sense? is software eating the PhD too?

      It makes me wonder, as I have been spending more and more time seeking a meaningful education online, and/or to even figure out what that means..

      I would say the answer to the PhD problem.. is that we have to reimagine the PhD. and to create one ourselves. the real challenge comes where to find the accountability, as well as the recognition of the work you've done. Perhaps "Learning in Public" or detailing what you've learned along the way is the right move.