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    • TranquilHazescouted11 months ago
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    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Elemental by MediumEmma Pattee4/5/219 min
      Elemental by Medium
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      Some researchers call this bedtime procrastination or while-in-bed procrastination, while the Chinese word for it translates to “revenge bedtime procrastination.”

      “When it comes to the evening, they categorically refuse to go to bed early, at a time they know will suit them best and enable them to get adequate restorative sleep and feel better,” explains Edwards. “Nevertheless there is a sense of retaliation against life, so there is an idea of revenge to stay awake and do whatever fills their bucket.”

      “An interesting difference may be that people typically procrastinate on tasks they find aversive—housework, homework, boring tasks—while sleeping for most people is not aversive at all,” says Kroese. “It might be the bedtime routines that precede going to bed that people dislike or just that they do not like quitting whatever they were doing.”

      "By breaking up the last hour before you want to be asleep, you are not only enacting a clear plan but also addressing any tasks you may have missed or pushed. You’re taking charge of your health with a routine and managing any potentially suppressed emotions from the day. And all of this is to get ample rest and tackle the next day head-on (no revenge needed)."

    • TranquilHazeread1 year ago
      The Baffler9/4/1733 min
      The Baffler
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      The AtlanticDerek Thompson3/29/2114 min
      The Atlantic
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      The AtlanticDavid A. Graham3/27/216 min
      The Atlantic

      The success of the aviation industry in improving standards and reducing accidents suggests it would be straightforward (if not easy) and valuable to do the same in shipping. “We know how to do this,” Konrad said. But without improved bridge resource management, the maritime industry will remain just as stuck as the Ever Given—and probably for much longer.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      Yet, TV isn’t all bad, says Braverman. “There are tons of programs that challenge brain, such as shows about history,” he says. “Life is not about learning every second. TV is a tremendous potential source if properly handled. The problem is that it’s a difficult instrument to control. Some things have more destructive qualities, and TV is one of them. Just like sugar is a deceitful food, TV is a deceitful presentation of life.”

      Braverman has a formula for how much is okay: “Everybody needs an hour of aerobic exercise every day,” he says. “If you work out for an hour, you can watch TV for an hour. Work out for two hours, and you can watch for two hours. Never watch more television than the amount of time you exercise.”

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
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      ideas.ted.com3/23/218 min
      ideas.ted.com

      When you think about how to praise employees, it helps to realize there are two distinct kinds.

      The first is the praise about a strength that moves the entire team forward, or what I call a “we-strength.” A we-strength is a strength that elevates the team or organization.

      The second kind of praise is about a strength that makes the employee stronger, or what I call a “me-strength.” What work energizes someone? What makes them feel excited to keep plugging away at a problem? A me-strength puts a person in what’s known as a flow state, where they’re fully immersed in the work, losing track of time because the work is so intrinsically satisfying.

      Sometimes we-strengths and me-strengths are one and the same, but I’ve found that often someone’s we-strengths are quite different from their me-strengths. What lights up an individual can be very different from what lights up the team.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Outside OnlineMark Sundeen3/23/2141 min
      Outside Online
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      Since 1985, according to Deltares, a Dutch research group, humans have added 5,237 square miles (13,564 sq km) of artificial land to the world’s coasts. China is a major—and growing—contributor to that total.

      Island building, as China has shown, is one of the most important projects there is. Today, geopolitical power goes not only to those who control territory but to those who can manufacture it.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      When you take a photo, your smartphone or digital camera stores "metadata" within the image file. This automatically and parasitically burrows itself into every photo you take. It is data about data, providing identifying information such as when and where an image was captured, and what type of camera was used.

      This lack of awareness has proven useful for police investigators, to help them place unwitting criminals at a scene. But it also poses a privacy problem for law-abiding citizens if the authorities can track their activities through images on their camera and social media. And unfortunately, savvy criminals can use the same tricks as the police: if they can discover where and when a photo was taken, it can leave you vulnerable to crimes such as burglary or stalking.

      But metadata is not the only thing hidden in your photos. There is also a unique personal identifier linking every image you capture to the specific camera used, but it's one you'd probably never suspect. Even professional photographers might not realise or remember that it's there.

      When considering these privacy issues, we might draw parallels with another technology. Many colour printers add secret tracking dots to documents: virtually invisible yellow dots that reveal a printer's serial number, as well as the date and time a document was printed.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Experience Magazine3/24/219 min
      Experience Magazine

      “Location technologies offer new options for safety and security, but they allow you to track your children in ways that simply were not possible for all of human history up until this point.”

      To Reynolds, the most worrisome aspect of the technology is the effect it may have on the relationship between a parent and a child. If a teenager interprets a parent’s desire to track them as a lack of trust, Reynolds says, it can fundamentally undermine the relationship. What’s more, he says, location tracking does not necessarily equate to better parenting.

      “These new tools are marketed to parents as a way to increase their capacity to care for their child,” Reynolds says. “But what they really mean is increasing their capacity to monitor and to surveil their child. To automatically assume that extra surveillance will lead to greater care is something I think we need to really stop and think about.”

      “If this technology is going to be used, I would hope that there is honest communication between the child and the parents, and that there’s an explicit acknowledgment of the trust factors at play,” he says. “That seems to me to be the most optimal scenario.”

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Pocket1 min
      Pocket
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      offspring.lifehacker.comMeghan Moravcik Walbert1/29/217 min
      offspring.lifehacker.com
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      offspring.lifehacker.comMeghan Moravcik Walbert3/25/2110 min
      offspring.lifehacker.com
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Pocket7 min
      Pocket

      If you are looking for ways to relax, unwind, and improve your sleep—or if you simply like the idea of a warm, tasty beverage adding a little cozy to your evening—this Soothing Bedtime Golden Milk recipe has been a wonderful addition to my nighttime routine, and I can see it having a welcome spot in yours too!

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      In many of those cases, the court summarily overturned lower court rulings using an obscure legal procedure known as the “shadow docket.” But the short-circuit approach, intended only for emergencies, isn’t reserved for death penalty cases.

      Increasingly, the court relies on the shadow docket to make decisions in a wide range of consequential cases, often in a dramatically accelerated fashion and without providing signed opinions or detailed explanations. Sometimes, as in death penalty cases, the decisions are irreversible.

      Cases on the docket can be effectively resolved even as lower courts are continuing to assess them – sometimes even before all the evidence is known. Decisions can come in the middle of the night, with no public discussion and no guidance to lower-court judges on how to analyze similar cases.

      The speed and secretiveness has drawn criticism from legal experts both on the right and left, who call it an improper use of the court’s tremendous power.

      “It’s hard for the public to know what is going on, and it’s hard for the public to trust that the court is doing its best work”

      Although the shadow docket has long been part of the Supreme Court’s operations, The Trump Justice Department broke norms by repeatedly resorting to these emergency applications to undo the actions of lower courts it disliked – sometimes leapfrogging appeals courts along the way.

      “It felt like really casting aside the normal judicial process in a very, very heavy-handed way,” Minter said.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Pocket5 min
      Pocket

      Are you working on a lot of things? Is your attention not on one thing? There’s a big chance that you will not achieve the best possible results. Or worse: You might fail if you try to achieve many things at the same time

      The reason is simple: Most of us believe that success happens all at once. Real life is different. Keller and Papasan put it well:

      “Success is sequential, not simultaneous.”

      Things add up. You learn one skill. Then another. You finish one project. Then another. Over time, your accomplishments add up to form an impressive feat.

      If you want to see the impact of compounding in your own life, it requires you to focus on one thing at a time (for every aspect of your life) and always look at the bigger picture.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      The New York Times CompanyDorie Chevlen3/24/214 min
      The New York Times Company
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      One study found that social rejection provoked a response in its victims similar to that of victims of physical abuse; the anterior cingulate cortex area of the brain—the area thought to interpret emotion and pain—was active in both instances. “Exclusion and rejection literally hurt,” John Bargh, a psychology professor at Yale, told me.

      But the silent treatment ultimately harms the person causing it, too. Humans are predisposed to reciprocate social cues, so ignoring someone goes against our nature, Williams said. The perpetrator is therefore forced to justify the behavior in order to keep doing it; they keep in mind all the reasons they’re choosing to ignore someone. “You end up living in a constant state of anger and negativity,” Williams said.

      when someone is using the silent treatment to exclude, punish, or control, the victim should tell the perpetrator that they wish to resolve the issue. To “voice the pain of being ignored” is a constructive way of expressing one’s feelings, and may elicit a change if the relationship is truly founded on care

      In the end, whether it lasts four hours or four decades, the silent treatment says more about the person doing it than it does about the person receiving it.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      Regardless of how the decision was justified, many took issue with it. In an anonymous editorial for the Delta Democrat-Times, a critic wrote:

      “But Mississippi’s ETV commission won’t be showing it for the time being because of one fatal defect, as measured by Mississippi’s political leadership. Sesame Street is integrated. Some of its leading cast members are black, including the man who does much of the overt ‘teaching.’ The neighborhood of the ‘street’ is a mixed one. And all that, of course, goes against the Mississippi grain.”

      Joan Ganz Cooney called the decision a “tragedy” for young people.

      Fortunately, it was a tragedy with a short shelf life. The following month, the board reconvened and reversed its own informal poll result, approving of Sesame Street and agreeing that ETV could air it as soon as they received tapes of the program. Thanks to feeds from Memphis, New Orleans, and Alabama, Sesame Street could already be seen in parts of Mississippi. And thanks to the deluge of negative responses, it seemed pointless to try to placate politicians who still favored segregation.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Squeaks and NibblesShannon Cutts6/6/185 min
      Squeaks and Nibbles
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Squeaks and NibblesSarah Holloway5/9/1914 min
      Squeaks and Nibbles
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      It had come to him in his dreams — this amazing, almost atonal soundscape. But whenever Singh awoke and rushed to his saxophone or keyboard, the sound was just beyond his grasp. Nothing felt quite right. Unable to recreate what he had experienced in his sleep, Singh realized this music existed outside of the rigid 12-note structure of Western music, in which he had been trained as a jazz musician. He needed an instrument that could access the subtle tones between those notes — so he spent two years and his life savings creating one.

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      The sun radiates far more high-frequency light than expected, raising questions about unknown features of the sun’s magnetic field and the possibility of even more exotic physics.

      “The worst that can happen here is that we find out that the sun is stranger and more beautiful than we ever imagined,” Beacom said. “And the best that could happen is we discover some kind of new physics.”

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
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      Squeaks and NibblesEmma Stenhouse3/4/1911 min
      Squeaks and Nibbles
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago
      Little Furry Pets10/7/2011 min
      Little Furry Pets
    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      The world seems ordered, going from past to present, linking cause and effect, because of our perspective. We superimpose order upon it, fixing events into a particular, linear series. We link events to outcomes, and this give us a sense of time.

      But the universe is much more complex and chaotic than we can allow for, according to Rovelli. Humans rely on approximate descriptions that actually ignore most of the other events, relations, and possibilities. Our limitations create a false, or incomplete, sense of order that doesn’t tell the whole story.

      The physicist argues that, in fact, we “blur” the world to focus on it, blind ourselves to see. For that reason, Rovelli writes, “Time is ignorance.”

      Basically, he believes, time is a story we’re always telling ourselves in the present tense, individually and together. It’s a collective act of introspection and narrative, record-keeping and expectation, that’s based on our relationship to prior events and the sense that happenings are impending. It is this tale that gives us our sense of self as well, a feeling that many neuroscientists, mystics, and the physicist argue is a mass delusion.

      Without a record—or memory—and expectations of continuation, we would not experience time’s passage or even know who we are, Rovelli contends. Time, then, is an emotional and psychological experience. “It’s loosely connected with external reality,” he says, “but it is mostly something that happens now in our head.”

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      Turns out a letter had been drafted to notify Dad that they were concerned with his behavior and use of the pass. But they decided not to send it. They didn’t want the bad press — what it might mean to terminate a lifetime AAirpass from a frequent flyer. So they terminated it without warning, at the airport — a gut-punch, right into Dad’s proverbial heart.

    • TranquilHazecommented1 year ago

      The cloth was thoroughly endorsed by Mughal emperors and their wives, who were rarely painted wearing anything else. They went so far as to bring the best weavers under their patronage, employing them directly and banning them from selling the very finest cloth to others. According to popular legend, its transparency led to yet more trouble when the emperor Aurangzeb scolded his daughter for appearing in public naked, when she was, in fact, ensconced in seven layers of it.

      ^ That sounds like the conceptual beginnings for The Emperor's New Clothes

    • TranquilHazescouted1 year ago

      Nobody knows for certain why the horse was made. “It’s a beautiful shape, very elegant,” says Miles. “It looks like it’s bounding across the hillside. If you look at it from below, the sun rises from behind it and crosses over it. In Celtic art, horses are often shown pulling the chariot of the sun, so that may be what they were thinking of here.”

      From the start the horse would have required regular upkeep to stay visible. It might seem strange that the horse’s creators chose such an unstable form for their monument, but archaeologists believe this could have been intentional. A chalk hill figure requires a social group to maintain it, and it could be that today’s cleaning is an echo of an early ritual gathering that was part of the horse’s original function.

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