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    • Abarletcommented8 months ago

      Heartbreaking and tragic indeed. Not only am I sad for the family of Halyna Hutchins but my heart breaks for Alec Baldwin who must live with this tragedy for the rest of his days. Right after this occurred I was stunned to see some really unkind comments on social media towards Alec Baldwin. That blew me away that someone could be so hurtful that they would kick a man when he is down. So shameful. I hope everyone somehow finds peace after this.

    • Abarletscouted8 months ago

      I never really had any strong opinions about Katie Couric until recently I started reading excerpts from her new book. Blurbs published that seemed very un-Katie Couric -ish. Women referenced in her book trying to hold back the pain and hurt that her words had inflicted on them. That has caused some rethinking of having an opiniong about Katie Couric. The thing that bothers me most is lack of embracing other female colleagues. Females= the competition. Rather than partner, or mentor or heap praise on other women, Couric seems siloed in her own female, one-person show. It is shameful. And while I appreciate her honesty in exposing warts and all, her racist family ties, and editing of an RBG interview, I cannot get past her competitive nature with other women in the business. I'm glad I read this article about Katie Couric because I have no intent in putting money into her book.

    • Abarletcommented1 year ago

      Many gyms have found legitimate ways to move workouts outside. So many gyms are small, boutique, mom and pop businesses and they are struggling to pay bills. If they don’t open soon they will likely be forced to close permanently.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      I only joined FB a little more than a year ago. At 55 I’m late to the game but really was in no hurry to play in the game. 16 months later and I admit FB is a daily read for me. And what is most intriguing is the algorithm they use that decides what is put in front of me. I watch dog videos. Animal pictures. Mostly warm and fuzzy stuff that hopefully doesn’t divide anyone. So the more I watch these things the more FB sends my way. I get it. But sometimes I am just thinking about something and a relevant ad pops up on FB? How did it anticipate my need before I ever expressed it? That’s magical and creepy and the same time. At the end of the day it is all about revenue and revenue is tied to the algorithm of understanding user behavior. Just a bunch of metrics.

    • Abarletscouted2 years ago
      steve lockeSteve Locke12/4/158 min
      steve locke

      Wow. For a moment you are in his shoes, and it is very frightening. If you were a police officer, how would you have handled this?

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      EsquireA.J. Jacobs7/24/0724 min
      Esquire

      Very funny. Reality? Let's hope not. I am pretty sure I could not be in the same room with someone who practiced this type of radical honesty. There is radical honesty that comes from a 5-year-old (Your hair looks funny.) And then there is radical honesty that comes from a full-grown adult, which is just rude and insulting, and didn't your Mom teach you any manners? I guess I must fall into the radical Dishonesty camp. Still a funny read.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      My takeaway is that truth is better than fiction.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      Reading some of the comments here it seems there is a belief that doctors are somehow compensated by Pharma companies and that is the reason they prescribe pills over exercise. There may have been a day when doctors received compensation or kickbacks but that day is long gone. Drug reps know they are not permitted to leave or give any “gifts” to a medical professional.
      I went to a primary care doctor one time who actually did a literature search and looked up something while I was sitting right there. I was so impressed, and he was not of the Google generation either. He was a few decades older than me and yet he was perfectly comfortable with the perception that he didn’t know everything off the top of his head and needed to look up something. That’s the kind of doctor I want — one that prescribes a solution based on the evidence.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      James Clear10/1/187 min
      James Clear

      "Every Monday, my assistant would reset the passwords on all my social media accounts, which logged me out on each device. All week I worked without distraction." Brilliant idea.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      Mark Manson4/2/1517 min
      Mark Manson

      Sorry. Not for me. I can't pick out a single book here that I would actually read voluntarily. And it's hard to believe the author is actually recommending these books after the slamming comments made at the end of each review. Nietzsche. Really? The author is just a little too flip for my liking. Sorry.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      The New York Times CompanyGabrielle Hamilton4/23/2031 min
      The New York Times Company

      Loves this article. So well written. I lived for a few years in Chelsea. You could try a different restaurant every day in the city. It felt like each establishment became part its own little neighborhood community. I hope Prune returns one day and flourishes. Without a brunch.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      n 14/7/209 min
      n 1

      Anxiety exists in all of us. And the selfish part is when we don’t share with others when we are immersed in it.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      I am exhausted reading about all your social media accounts. To be honest, I have never heard of some of those platforms. Maybe it's my age? (I'm not that old.) I completely understand that at some point it is therapeutic to pull the plug and stop the madness. Why go back? Seems to me like social media is an excellent forum for you to promote ReadUp. To me, that seems like a pretty good reason to start again.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      “I have found over and over that the proximity of death in shared calamity makes many people more urgently alive, less attached to the small things in life and more committed to the big ones, often including civil society or the common good.”

    • Abarletscouted2 years ago
      The New York Times CompanyTaylor Lorenz4/14/207 min
      The New York Times Company

      There is a reason why I always click on stories, pictures, videos of dogs. They make me happy. They are such a good distraction from all the unhappy news. Dogs are my silent therapy. Keep bringing me more dog videos!

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      The New York Times CompanySung J. Woo5/9/138 min
      The New York Times Company

      Sweet. No denying a Mother’s love. There are certainly worse things to complain about than a Mother cooking out of love. Perhaps he could have donated a few dishes to the homeless.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      The Paris ReviewCJ Hauser7/16/1920 min
      The Paris Review

      Wonderful story. Lessons are never too late to learn. I love when she breaks out of being the "author" stating "Reader, I almost married him."
      "If you want to save a species, you don't spend your time starting at the bird you want to save. You look at the things it relies on to live instead."

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      nautil.us12/29/1644 min
      nautil.us

      Yeah this article felt so familiar to me. I need time to process this but absolutely wonderful writing.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      Thought provoking. It sounds like a good solution for the homeless and for the health of the overall city. And it should bring some minimal revenue to those hotels— I assume via taxes. So it could be a win win Why not provide cleaning supplies to each room and require the occupants maintain cleanliness rather than rely on a cleaning staff. I think there are ways to make this work and let it be an example for other cities.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      The New York Times CompanyCathy Park Hong4/12/2015 min
      The New York Times Company

      Racism is awful.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      billloundy.com4/7/202 min
      billloundy.com

      Brought me some peace at the end of a hectic day.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      Thank you for acknowledging the fear factor.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      The New YorkerRachel Aviv3/30/2045 min
      The New Yorker

      Fascinating read on so many levels. Losing “self” can happen in so many ways. I was not anticipating the suicide followed by the legal battle. Complex story. Curious to find a video of this dance.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      Carve Magazine26 min
      Carve Magazine

      Incredible that this is a true story. Extraordinary measures to perpetuate the lie. Can you explain the meaning of the title?

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      The New YorkerKate Folk3/16/2040 min
      The New Yorker

      Yes, I agree there is a depressing, sadness to this read. I have never heard the term BLOT before, but I get it. I suppose it is the result of the electronic dating world.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      Believer Magazine2/1/1925 min
      Believer Magazine

      Hmm. I’m not such a fan of this article. Tame or be tamed? I see horses as beautiful animals. Not sexual. Sorry I’m probably the outcast on this one.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      It doesn't get any more relevant than this. Yes, I need an information diet. I have always had a home office, so not a huge adjustment for me, AND yet, I find myself more immersed than ever in the 24x7 corona-palooza streaming news. I have never spent more time on social media. It's exhausting. When I walk away from my office the thing I want to do is go lie down. I didn't step foot outside yesterday until 6pm. So, yes, I need to take a chill pill on the news and information, and I need to figure out a way to find some peace.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      I need time to process this but I am glad I read it.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      gizmodo.comVictoria Song3/24/2017 min
      gizmodo.com

      Yes! I completely remember my parents having a washer and dryer that lasted for 20 years. Now I feel lucky if I get 3 years out of these appliances. I have no interest in smart anything if it requires I have to subscribe to make my dishwasher work. No thanks. I understand that technology moves on and companies always have a roadmap. If you want to invest in technology you better be prepared to stick with all the updates over the long haul.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      nautil.us3/12/2016 min
      nautil.us

      At the end of this I was hoping I was reading a piece of science fiction — like a Michael Crichton piece. Knowing this is our new reality is scary. I take away a couple things from this. First, we have incredible scientists and capabilities to figure this out. Find medicines and vaccines. But second there is no coordinated, global effort to share and communicate and strategize as one human population. Each country takes its own path for handling its own health crisis, but what about a global strategy to handle the science behind it all?

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      This was a medical worker with flu symptoms. Even if they didn’t think it was coronavirus, where is the common sense to just stay home?

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      Cell phones are a new reality of this century, but being late is a timeless issue. (I didn’t intend that to be a pun). I had a meeting with an old friend yesterday at noon and I joked with him that he is like clockwork with his punctuality. And that was meant to be a compliment and he took it as one. Indeed it is just being respectful of the other person’s time.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      capwatkins.comCap Watkins3 min
      capwatkins.com

      Good point. You have to pick your battles. Are you prepared to die on that mountain for what ever you are debating or does it really not matter?

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      This company was unraveling from day one. Managed by ego rather than sound business strategies of quality and service, Homepolish is a classic business school study in What Not To Do. P.S. I never even heard of this company so all that spend on marketing was not very effective.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      washingtonpostCarl Goldman2/28/206 min
      washingtonpost

      Thank you for this dose of reality. A thermometer and some ibuprofen. Doesn’t sound like the zombie apocalypse.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      billloundy.substack.comBill Loundy2 min
      billloundy.substack.com

      I love the pictures and thank you for including a link to Pet Milk. I haven’t read it but I’m intrigued. Be safe out there and don’t forget to call home and check in. Haha. That’s just the Mom in me talking.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      Highline - HuffPostMichael Hobbes54 min
      Highline - HuffPost

      Yes the title was intriguing and pulled me in. The more I kept reading the more I thought there was a build up and I was expecting to read the clear and final solution of how to lose weight. Not an enlightening read but rather a summary of things I have always known.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago
      Longreads1/14/2027 min
      Longreads

      Burning Man is very foreign to me so I enjoyed reading about this experience.

    • Abarletcommented2 years ago

      I definitely fall into the phonics camp. I learned to sound out words and we own those Dick and Jane books. My Dad had me read those to him often. However watching a loved one struggle with reading because of dyslexia I can completely agree that phonics is not for everyone. It’s a balance. I had never heard of the term “cueing” as a program for reading until this article.